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Full text of "Hardware merchandising (January-June 1903)"

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Howell's Babble Montreal. 



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£A MADff Aj^ 




s*e B i^ 



Arrow WingedShoe I&S.Works 






TRADE MARKS REG'D 



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^ 



Sfe SKATES oQ* 8 



For Sal* by Leading Wholasaia Hardwar* Housas. 



IMII I I 111 NETTING. 



LYSAGtlT'S make Is always reliable— well made, 
well galvanized, true to length, width, and weight. 
Galvanized after woven, the safest and most 
durable. 



JOHN LYSAGHT Limited, Makert, A. C. LE8LIE A CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, END. Managers Canadian Braneb. 



' 




'SafM" Radiators 



Manufactured for Heating all 
classes of Buildings by Hot 
Water or Steam. Made in 
different heights, beautiful de- 
signs. Plain or Ornamental. 



I THE DOMINION RADIATO R CO., Limited 

I Head Office an<| Works: DUFFERIN ST. ^ ™~" TORONTO, CAN. 



s 


KATE 


S 


K 
A 


Hockey Sullies 


A 


T 


PADS, III f L SUPPORTS, 


T 


■ 

E 


81 ICKS, PUCKS, ETC. 


1 

E 


S 


KATE 


3. 


ocnu run i^mimluijuc. 

RICE LEWI5 & SON, , 

LIMITED | 

Cor. King and Victoria Streets, TORONTOJ 











METALS 



ANTIMONY LEAD 

COPPER TIN 

PIG IRON ZINC 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CC. 

27 Wellington St. West, ^TORONTO, ON'. 

English Houm : SAMUEL, RONS * BENJAMIN. 164 renchnroh St., LONDON, EC 



,U8 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

HEYRE ALL ALIKE 



THAT'S THE BEAUTY OF THE 




BOOKLET 

COMING 

if you'll ask for 
a copy with 
trade discount. 



Jobbers. 

A. L. SILBERSTEIN 



GARDEN 
HOSE 

We solicit your enquiries for 
samples and prices for next season. 

Our line is complete, embracing 
the old lines with some new ones. 



All brands made with our Patent 
SeamleSS Tube to stand city pres- 
sures. 



Mfrs. of J0t* 



CUTLERY 



453-461 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 

Hanufacturers of Rubber Goods, 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



Other Tools are very 
guiH) lools. but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




"YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
— * 1 N9I5 



In." I • ■-.iTI 



No,. 15. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade 



-V.NKtC- jr 

I I L 3. B. L-H»TC W|T MMtg 

M » » ,' l .< l'11 W l* 



acia 




Oar "YA NKEE " Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




No. 50. ' Yank«e " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Stool. Brass Wood, etc. 



Manufacturers also ot 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BUZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



■ 



No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Sorew Driver. 



Philadelphia, Pa„ U.S. A 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






See! You Don't Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 




No34 



No 15 



I — „.„„,,_, , P „1 rwAlKtI5u:ilUE«SAl~l I er.ow"ii,\ S r« 1 fw/UKcn I UMivcdsai. I 

|tW-M»S SClf MLlCgJ |__££LFPULLEB_J 1. MPMir «JL "n J | si l» PUULIWO J 



No 39. 



Ma. 14 



No.17 



NO. 16 



Walker's Self=Pulling Cork Screws i 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Wood Handles. f 

EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several Imitations on the market, but none as goo>j 
Mfrd. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



Lockerby & McGomb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



WIRE ROPE 



Wire Rope. 



OF. 




All Kinds and Sizes 



AND FOR 

All Purposes. 

PRICES RIGHT. PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 

The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 



Screen Door Hardware. 



(NON-HOLDBACK 



Made of 
High-Grade 

Steel 
Spring 
Wife 
and in 
Various 
Finishes, 




Spring 
Hinges 

Strortji 

and 

Handsomely 

Finished. 




STOCK 
Prompt 

SHIPMENTS. 



8TAR COIL 
DOOE 8PRING, 
Also the OEM. 



COLUMBIA 

Single and Doable Acting. 



ACORN. 



TORBEY ROD 
DOOR SPRING 



FOR PRICES WRITE: 



The Columbian Hardware Co., Makers, Cleveland, Ohio 

Lamplough & McNaughton 



v*~> 



GEM WIRE DOOR PULL. 



CANADIAN SALES AGENTS, 

9 De Bresoles Street, MONTREAL 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



DISSTON DISSTON DISSTON DISSTON DISSTON DISSTON DISSTON DISSTON DlSSTON 



DlSSTON'S SAWS 

KNOWN THE WORLD OVER AS THE BEST. 







uw»« 



vwtvwvt VV\ WtlWU 



>w v vv\ \ vw v ii \ \ i \ i v v v v-wv 



i 



UL 



NO. D8, HAND, RIP AND PANEL SAWS. 



&&^ 

** 








NO 12, HAND, RIP AND PANEL SAWS. 



rv 



+m 



DISSTON NARROW TREE SAW 






^ BY C„STO„ 4So/yj 
CA.TRA THIN SACK 




NO. I, CHAMPION CROSS CUT SAW. 



- 










■£m 






\ 



Hill'' 






ST. LAWRENCE CROSS CUT SAW. 



QUOTE LOH 



Mill' QLICK 



Lewi* Bros. & Co. 

WHOLESALE AGENTS 

Address all communications to MONTREAL. 

TOCONTO: 87 >ork St. OIHM: 5» Qcicen St. 



Noissia NOissia noxssiq — NO±ssia Noxssia Noxssia- noxisiq Noxssia noj.ssiq 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RE-ACTING WASHER 



The quickest acting, readiest 
selling, Mid most renermUa 
w uhiofl 
Machine on the market 

The «»ni> regret your ous- 
tomen will Inn. after buy- 
ing one of these excellent 
maohinee is that tiny « 1 i « I 
do! knon about it sooner 

rii. > require them you 
should stiM-k them «< can 
supply them. Order early. 




The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., 

HAMILTON. 



Limited 



W. L HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal, Eastern Agents. 



A Silent Salesman that Talks Goods 



YOURS TREE 




The 

"NEW GEM' 

Safety 

Razor. 



Send your order 
for our following 
"sure sellers" and 
this silent sales- 
man is yours. 

We have made 
these selections 
/rom our knowl- 
edge of the goods 
most demanded 
by your trade. 
Hu have the 
l>rivilege at any 
time of sending 
back for exchange 
any "New Gem" 
sets that are not 
found ready sell- 
ers 



The accompanying illustration conveys Inn a poor idea of the 
beauty of this show-case attractive in size, unique in roast ruel ion 
- all in all a tivture that any merchant may well be proud to place 
where the customer's eye can best be caught. 



Who'esale. 
6 "New Gem" Razors $6.00 

1 Strop Machine 92 

2 Cases No. 1 3.00 

1 Case No. 2 2.25 

1 Case No. 3 2.96 

1 Case No. 4 3.67 

1 Case No. 18 1.25 

$20.05 



Retail. 
$12.00 
1.50 
5.00 
3.50 
4.50 
5.50 
2.26 



$31.25 



For sale by Cutlery Jobbers all over the world. 

GErt CUTLERY CO., 31 Readc St., New York. 




ESTABLISHED 1750 



TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS 
"" R0PERIE 



LEITH 



UFACTUR 



Cordage 



MANILA ROPE 

SISAL ROPE 

NEW ZEALAND ROPE 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHING LINES 

NETTING TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS& PACKINCS 

BAILING ROPES 8. CORDS 




& Canvas 



1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINGS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAULINCS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPING TWINES 



BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



3*MK 



1 

EOINBURCH 

WATERPROOF] 



SAIL CLOTH =o 
tJCOMPANVff 
*$> LEITH g 




ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CAN ADIAN]OFFICE AND STORES, 

(THE EDINBURGH R0PERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




A. G. SPALDING 
& BROS'. 

TRADE-MARKED 

Line of Athletic Goods 




THE DEALER thai is clever enough to look out tor his own interests will be the one thai will order Spalding's 
trade-marked line of implements ahd nothing else. For over a quarter of a century the Spalding trade mark haa 
been the standard in the athletic goods industry, and the track- mark on the implement is a guarantee thai the 
article is official and correct and in use by the champions throughoul the world where athletii sports are indulged in. 

BOXING GLOVES. 

The largest and most complete line o\ Boxing Gloves in the world to select from. The Spalding Championship 
Gloves, endorsed by all the champions apd used bj them. Three styles at $0 each. Tin- Spalding Special, al Si each. 
The Spalding Gloves with the new patent palm lacing and patent palm t^rip is an improvement thai has made the Spalding 
Gloves the sellers this season. Fourteen different styles and no dealer can be up to date with this line unless he has a 
catalogue before him. Prices are fixed and final. 

STRIKING BAG. 

The Spalding Championship Hat;, originally designed by " Kid " McCoy, is the one that is used by the experts and 
the professional men. Price, ST. Nine other Swinging Bags for the dealer to select from. Spalding's Double-end Bag, 
the Fitzsimmons 1 Special, is the best in this line at $6. Seven other-, a- low as $1. 



ICI 



SKATI 



Complete line of Peck & Snyder's American Crab Skates, for over thirt) years the leading Skate in America. It is 
copied by man) , but never equalled. 

Spalding's line o( Hockev goods is admitted by the players to be the most perfect line on the market. This not onlv 

applies to the stick and puck, but also to sundries that are required by hockey players. The Spalding "Shamrock" Hockey 

Stick requires no introduction to Canadians. Endorsed and used by the Shamrocks oi Montreal, and the champion-, oi l he 
world, the Victoria team. 

The Spalding official trade-marked Puck is the official Puck of the Canadian Amateur Hockej League. 

Now is the time (or the dealer to think o( next season's business. The wise dealer will be the onv that carries the 
Spalding complete line <*f baseball j^oods. Spalding in baseball is synonym for perfection, and wherever baseball is pla\ed, 
in order to have the game officially played, Spalding's goods must be used. For a quarter of a century Spalding has held 
the field in the baseball line. 

Lawn Tennis last year was the best in man) years in the tennis line ; 1903 promises to be better. Spalding's line o( 

Lawn Tennis goods is unequalled. 

Then there is Spalding's official Basketball, the one that must be used in all games, as well as the official goal posts 
and goals. 

The Spalding Intercollegiate Football, No. J55. This is the ball that is used by Vale, Princeton, Harvard, Pennsyl- 
vania, Cornell, Chicago, University o( California. Ever) team that plays football in America uses this. ball. 

GOLF" GOODS. 

The largest and most complete line in the world, and made by the most expert golfers in the world. Everything in the 

golf line is up-to-date. 

The dealer that wants to have his store up to date will be the one th.it carries a complete line o( Spalding's Athletic 
Library the American aul hoi itv on all matters athletic. Each book complete in itself, and wherever displayed find read\ 
buyers. If \oj have not a cops of Spalding's Athletic Catalogue before you, send lis a postal card and we will send you one. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROTHERS, 

The Largest Makers of Athletic Supplies In the World. 

767 Craig Street, - MONTREAL, CANADA. 

53-55 Fetter Lane, - - LONDON, ENGLAND. 

New York, Chicago, Denver, Buffalo, Baltimore, Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco, 
/Minneapolis, St. Louis, Kansas City. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 



SHEFFIELD, 
ENGLAND. 




TINPLATES : 

"Rogers" Cokes. 

" H. R. S. & Co." Charcoals. 

CANADA PLATES: 

"H. R. S. & Co." 

Canadian Office : 
6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TINWARE AND UN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
J .. ckutcd Oil Caos 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Palls, Etc. 

JAS. A. McGOLPIN 

156-162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN ? 
Bend for Polder No. 1 1. 

Pullman Sash Bal. Co. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 



WILLIAM ABBOTT 

Representing Jonas A Colver's Celebrated "Novo" 
Air Hardening Steel. Especially adapted for high 
speed and for all classes of fools and work. Easily 
annealed, for shaping into Milling cutters, Dies 
and other tools. Stock on hand for immediate 
orders. 

Office and Sample Room, 13 St. John Street, 

MONTREAL. 



1.100 PRINTED EkVELOPES ±&m 



For $1.00. 

We do good printing ch'ap— 500 
Noteheads, 500 Envelopes and fc(0 
Statements for 12.50. 

Snaps In Stationery of all kinds. 

WEESE & CO.. Jobbers, 
54 Vonge Street, - Toronto. 




THE MOST COMPLETE STOCK 



Brass a nrj Copper 



in Sheets, Tubes, Wire and Rod. 

Service Right, 
I Quality Right. Prices Right j 

WATERBURY BRASS GO. 



122 to 130 Centre St., 



New York City. 



Always have our classified .Stock 
List liefore you. 

YOURS FOR THE ASKING. 



' ^ 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited. 



TORONTO. 




Highest Award Pan - American Exposition. 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

rVftfui ROPE, !£V?!WM!. BINDER TWINE 

"■"""-" » Cord, p u |p Cord, Clothes Lines ^^___^___^^^__ 



Transmission Rope a Specialty. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 

Sisal Rope 

Jute Rope 

Russian Rope 

Marline 

Houseline 

Hambroline 

Clotheslines 

Tarred Hemp Rope 

White Hemp Rope 

Bolt Rope 

Hide Rope 

Halyards 

Deep Sealine 

Ratline 

Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Martin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" T/ansmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

»a Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

wm b stewart. MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel. 94 27 Front St., West, Toronto. 




<£ Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 



PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Mel bourne 
Sydney, 
BRITISH OFFICES: 
London, 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 



42 Cannon St., E.C. 
CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will receive prompt 

attention If addressed to the LONDON OFFICE, *2 cannon 

STREET, E.C. 

Specimen Copies Free on Application. 



Jt 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RD D\X A CC 9 f*C\ p OR T talbot, south wales, 
. D. Dl MOO Ot OU., GREAT BRITAIN. 

Largest MAKERS OF 

BEST SIEMENS STAMPING ENAMELLING 

BLACK PLATES, 

CIRCLES. RECTANGLES, Etc. 

MAKERS of all descriptions of STEEL SHEETS. 
Brands "SKER," and SKER BEST." 

Sole Canadian Export Agents, 

ROBERT CROOKS & CO., Botolph House, 10, Eastcheap, LONDON, E.C. 



Cable address : "CROLLO." LONDON. 




Square and 
Hexagon. 



Finished and 
Semi-Finished. 



A REMINDER 

THAT WE ARE THE ONLY 
CANADIAN MAKERS OF 



COLD PRESSED NUTS 



CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY, Limited, 

Head Office: TORONTO, ONT. 



DISTRICT OFFICE* : 
Montreal. Winnipeg. Halifax Ottawa. Vancouver. Victoria. Rossland. 



The Fairbanks Company 




Recognizing a demand for 
a cheaper grade of Scales 
than "The Standard" 

for domestic and farm use 
we offer 

IDE ■'CROW EVEN BALANCE. 
"THE RICHELIEU" UNION SCALE. 
"THE DOMINION" PLATFORM SCALE. 

These styles are well 
finished and are excellent 
Scales. 

Write for Catalogues 
and Prices. 



TI1C FAIRBANKS COMPANY, MON v T A R N E c A Q L UVER . 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



vDE 



Ou*. 



AUER LIGHT MANTLES 

\LQNGESTLJFE$ BRIGHTEST I 



Our. 
Mark 



I* Mark 

Our Chief Business 




is making mantles that 

last the longest and give 

_ the most light. 

/] is indelibly brand- 
/l_ed on the best man- 
tles made. 

Our factory is equipped 
with up-to-date applian- 
ces; our output is the lar- 
gest ; our goods the most 
reliable — We use nickel 
steel wire supports. 

We handle other goods, 
in such quantities that we 
can quote you lower pri- 
ces than you can import 
them for. No charge for 
cases or packing. 

Write for our quotations oni 




HIGH GALLERIES I Best 
LOW " f Quality 

HIGH GALLERIES) 2nd 
LOW ■' I Quality 

STRAIGHT CHIMNEYS 
BARREL 
MICA 

MICA CANOPIES 
OPAL SHADES PEAR GLOBES 

APPLE GLOBES SUNDRIES 




AUER LIGHT CO., 



MONTREAL. 



_r*>- 




GLOBE-POLISH 

3m 




INSIST ON HAYING IT 

Write for a supply of show cards and advertising novelties. 

RAIMES & CO., 164 Duane St., NEW YORK. 



Toronto, January ist, iooj. 

We thank our Customers for the very large share 
of business with which we have been favored during 
the past year. 

We are making preparations to do a larger trade 
than ever this year, and prompt shipment oj orders 
may be relied upon. 

We wish one and all a Happy and Prosperous 
New Year. 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO. 

TORONTO, CANADA. 



% 




VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 3, 1903 



NO. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNS MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

rhe Had ran Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories. Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal - 
Toronto 

London, Eng. 
Manchester, Eno 
Winnipeg 
Vancouver, B.C. 
St. John, N.B. - 
New York 



offices, 

232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

100 Fleet Street, E.C. 

W. H, Miln. 

- 18 St. Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

- Western Canada Block. 

J.J. Roberts. 

Flack Block. 

J. A. Macdonald. 

No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

Room 802 New York Life Bldg. 



Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - l'2s. 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address J ^cript, London 



A BUSINESS MAN FOR MAYOR. 

IT is to be hoped the business men of 
Toronto will do all in their power to 
secure the election of Aid. Daniel Lamb as 
Ma) 01 . 

Out of the lour men in the field who 
can be seriousl) taken as candidates, Mi 
Lamb is the onlj business man. The 
others are lawyers. 

\s a business man Mi. Lamb was .1 
success. The fact thai he amassed a sub- 
stantial fortune and years ago retired from 
active commercial life is prool ol 1 li i — . 

But Aid. Lamb's business experience is 
not his onl) qualification. . He has also 
had many years of municipal experience ; 
and there is probablv no one in the "CHiecn 



t ii\ " to-day who is better informed on 
municipal affairs than he is. His honesty 
and integrity no one has ever called in 
question, while the office tor which he is 
nowacandidate is seeking him, and nol he 
the office. 

(.''ne of the crying needs of Toronto is 
the quality of business in the administra- 
tion of its civic affairs. It natural!) fol- 
lows that if a man with large experience 
in both commercial and municipal life is 
placed in the civic chair an important step 
has been taken toward strengthening the 
city in that in which it is now so lament- 
ably weak. 



All experiments are not successful ; but 
had there been no experiments there would 
have been no great commercial enterprises. 



ADVANCE IN GLASSWARE. 

The prices of hollow table glassware were 
advanced, on January I, l."> per cent., and 
of lamp chimneys, l»» per cent, at the same 
dale. 

The manufacturers of glassware in the 
United States have been putting up prices 
and the Canadian manufacturers are fol- 
lowing in their steps. 

Il is claimed tliat the cost of production 
is greater now than six months ago- The 
scarcity and high price of soft coal has 
increased the cost of manufacturing the 
article, and also, in some instances, higher 
\\.i_;> -s have to be paid the workmen. 

As long as the coal market continues 
high, these advances will be sustained, and 
it should decline, the price ol" glassware 
will likelv follow. 



WHO SHOULD SELL BICYCLE 
ACCESSORIES? 

MANUFACTURERS of bicycle sun- 
dries in the United States are 
reporting the great and steady 
improvement in the bicycle and sundry 
business, and the oullook for the season ol' 

1003 is \er\ encouraging. 
I 
Jud^mj^ from the number of inquiries 

lor catalogues and price lists they ate daily 

receiving from hardwaremen, it really 

looks as if the business was now iU\ a 
tfood staple basis and the merchant is 
beginning lo realize tile fact. 

The dav is past w hen wheeling as a fad 
placed the handling of bicycles in the 
hands of irresponsible men ; and, further, 
the few changes that have been made in 

the construction of the bicycle the pa*i 

few years render it easy for the merchant 
lo carry an assorted line of sundries and 
parts that will prove nol only good 
sellers, but return tjood profits, and this 
fact I he hardwaremen should not lose 
sight of. 

In an interview with the largest bicycle 
manufacturing firm of Canada, the above 
tacts were fully substantiated, and the] 
are more than pleased with the number 
of inquiries the) are receiving from hard- 
waremen both in Ontario and the Eastern 
l'ro\ in< es. 

In England their business is now almost 
exclusively handled b\ hardwaremen, or 
ironmongers, as the) are called there. 
This all goes 10 prove thai in looking 
a staple article like bicycle accessories, 
people will look in .1 staple place for them 
and that place is the hardware si 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



DECLINE IN SPADES AND SHOVELS. 



THERE 1ms been made a reduction in the 
prices of spades and shovels in Canada, 
to meet competition from the United 
States and Great Britain. The new discount 
is L5 per cent, instead of 4-0 and 5 per cent, as 
before, and the list has been reduced $3 per 
doz. on Old's goods, $2 on Gray's, and $1 
on Burns'. With the above big reduction 
in the list, as well as the increased discount, 
a large reduction is made in the net prices. 
For example, Old's, which netted the trade 
last year about $8.30 per dozen, under the 
present prices will net $6.35, a difference of 
nearly $2 per dozen. This change being 
made only to meet competition from small 
makers in the United States and England 
the home manufacturers of course claim 
they have to satisfy the retail merchants as 
well as the consumers. Should conditions 
change in England and the United States, 
where cut-throat competition at present 
exists, the Canadian manufacturers claim 
they will have sufficient reason in fair play 
to take advantage of it. 

The cost of handles and of steel is to-day 
higher than it was last year and labor is 
better paid. It therefore looks as if the 
manufacturers' lot in spades and shovels is 
not a happy one at the present prices. We 
quote below the new list : 

JONES'. 

PATENT PLAIN BACK, SOLID CAST STEEL 
SHOVELS AM) SPADES. 
Polished. 
No. 20, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 2, $18.50 

21, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 4 19.50 

22, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 6 20.50 

23, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 8 21.50 

24, L or D Handle, Spades No. 2 18.50 

25, D Handle, Round Point Shovels, 

No. 3 19.00 

26, L Handle, Round Point Shovels, 

No. 2 1850 

27, L Handle, Round Point Shovels 

(narrow ) No. 2 18.50 

28, D Handle, Toy Spades 1450 

Black, 25c. net per doz. less. 

29, D Handle, Square Point Railway 

Shovel, black No. 2 18.50 

LID ( wi si EEL SOI Kl I SHOVELS. 
Half- Polished. 

30, L or D Handle. Square Point, 

13^ x 11 x io'A No. 4 15.80 

32, L or D Handle. Square Point, 

13M x n'A x 11 No. 5 16.30 

33. L or D Handle, Square Point, 

13% x 12 x n'A No. 6 16.80 

Black, 15c. net per doz. less. 

BURNS'. 

.1 PLAIN BACK, SOLID I \ - HOVELS 

AND SPADES. 

Polished. 
No. 40, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 2 $16.00 

41, I. or D Handle. Square Point 

Shovels No. 4 17.00 



or I) Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 6 18.00 

4.}. L or D Handle, Spades No. 2 16.00 

44, D Handle, Round Point Shovels, 

No. 3 16.50 

45, L Handle, Round Point Shovels, 

No 2 16.00 

46, I. Handle, Round Point Shovels, 

(narrow) No. 2 16.00 

47, D Handle, Toy Spades 1300 

Black, 25c. net per doz. less. 

GRAYS. 
PATENT PLAIN BACK, SOLID STEEL SHOVELS 

AND SPADES. 

Polished. 
No. 50, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 2, $1350 

51, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 4, 1450 

52, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 6, 1550 

53, L or D Handle, Spades. .. .No. a, i_'-5o 

54, D Handle Round Point Shovels, 

No. 3 14.00 

55, L Handle Round Point Shovels, 

No. 2 1350 

5*, L Handle Round Point Shovels 

(narrow) No. 2, 13 50 

Black, 25c. net per doz. less. 

OLDS 

PATENT PLAIN BACK, SOLID STEEL SHOVELS 

AND SPADES. 

Polished. 
No. 60, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 2, $11.50 

61, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No, 4, 12.50 

62, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovels No. 6, 13. 50 

63, L or D Handle, Spades. ...No. 2, 11.50 

64, L or D Handle, Round Point 

Shovels No. 2, 11.50 

65, L Handle, Round Point Shovels 

(narrow) No. 2 11.50 

Black 25c. net per doz. less. 

RIGOLLE DITCHING SHOVELS. 
PATENT PLAIN liLACK, SOLID CAST STEEL. 
Polished. 
No. 85, Jones' Lor D Handle, Square or 

Round Point $18.50 

86, Burns' L or D Handle, Square or 

Round Point 16.00 

87, Old's L or D Handle, Square or 

Round Point 11.50 

MOULDERS' SHOVELS. 

PATENT PLAIN HACK, SOLID 'AM STEEL. 

Polished, 

No. 90, Jones' D Handle $18 50 

91, Burns' ifi.oo 

92, Jones' Split D Handle 18.50 

93, Burns' 16.00 

AMERICAN PATENT SOCKET. 

snow SHOVELS. 

Black. 

No. ioo, Best Cast Steel, L Handle $5-5° 

101, T Handle 5.80 

ELY'S. 
CAST STEEL RIVETED BACK STRAP SHOVELS 
AND SPAD1 
Polished. 
No. no, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Shovel No. 2 $14.50 



in, L or D Handle, Square Point 

Spade No. 2 1450 

112, D Handle Round Point Shovel, 

No 3 15.00 

113, L Handle Round Point Shovel, 

No. 2 1450 

Black, 25c. net per doz. less. 

MINERS' SHOVELS— JONES'. 

CRUCIBL1 1 IS 1 5 I 1 .1- 1 1: MJK si k \p slim Kl S 

Polished. 

No. 120, L Handle, Round lull Spring 

I'oint No 2 $16.50 

121, L Handle, Round Half Spring 

Point No. 2 16.50 

ELY'S 

I Kl < [BLE CAS1 STEEL HACK s'lKAP SHOVELS. 

Polished. 
No. 122, L Handle, Round Full Spring 

Point No. 2 $14.50 

No 123, L Handle, Round Half Spring 

Point No. 2 14 50 

JONES'. 
sol 111 CAS1 STEEL SOCKET SHOVEL, BLACK. 
No. 124, D Handle, Square Point Coal 

Miner's Shovel $1700 

Sizes 13 in. by 15 in. 

HANDLKS. Per Do/.. 

No. 127, Long Shovel, Spade or Scoop, 

Bent, extra quality $325 

128, D. Shovel, Spade or Scoop, Bent 

and Riveted, extra quality 4.00 

129. Long Handle, for drain cleaners. 3.25 

SCOOPS— JONES'. 
PATENT SOLID CAST STEEL SOCKET. 

Half- Polished. 
No. 130, D Handle Scoops No. 2, $16.00 

131. 4. I7.O0 

131 'A, Narrow 

Mouth 4, 17.00 

132, D Handle Scoops 5, 1750 

133, " 6, 18.00 

134. D Handle Scoops, Locomotive, 

bla k No. 6 17.50 

134H, D Handle House Furnace 

Scoops, black No. o 12.00 

Black, ioc. net per doz. less. 
JONES' 

BACK STRAP CAST STEEL, RIVETED. 

Polished. 

No. 135, D Handle Scoops No. 2, $17.00 

136, " 4, 18.00 

137, " 6, 19.00 

138, " Round 

Point, Black 6, 18.50 

Black, 25c. net per doz, less. 
Half-Polished. 

No. 139, D Handle Scoops No. 8, $19 .70 

140, 10, 20.70 

Black, ioc. net per doz. less. 

WARD'S. 

BACK STRAP CAST STEEL, RIVETED. 

Polished. 
No. 143, D Handle Scoops ^No. 2, $16.00 

144, " 4, 1700 

145, " 6, 18.00 

Black, 25c. net per doz, less, 

LEEDS'. 

BACK STRAP STEEL, RIVETED. 

Half-Polished. 
No. 146, D Handle No. 2, $14 70 

147. " 4. IS 7° 

Black, ioc. net per doz. less. 



Mis. 1'. M. Cauchon, general merchant, 
St. Romuald, Que., is offering to com- 
promise at 40c. on the dollar. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




"l "l ' \ I'SON >v TOUD, Liverpool, 
^ \ lui\ e contracted fi ir all lumber 

cul bj Mel lachlin I '• [ M n 

|.M.. i. Out., during 1903, an a\ 
fully 10,000,000 feet. 

Skilled mechanics and laborers are in 
great demand in the Saull Ste Marie, 
Ont . di li 

Wilbei Gordon, hardware merchant, ol 
Tweed, Out . has purchased 1 1 1 * - foundrj 
owned and operated bj A. II. Leal >^ Son, 
and will in future manage it under the 
nan i' Leal Manufacturing Companj 

nu>\ i\i. ro orillia, on r. 

Tin- Dominion Wrought rron Wheel Co., 
Brock avenue, Toronto, have been offered 
inducements to remove t" Orillia, Ont., 
and will do -<> about March I. Orillia 
people have taken interest in the com 
pany, the capital stock of which has been 
ased to 150,000. Mr. -I- B. Tudhope, 
Ml'.. Mayor of Orillia, has been made 
president of the company, and Mr. la- 
I Knox, of Toronto, is vice-president. 
Mi. T, II Knox, who has been conneoted 
with R. G. Dun & Co. for the past 23 

has I n appointed general man 

ager, and the other directors are Mr. 
Win. Tudhope, Orillia. and Mr. W. \l>\ 
Mi Kay, of Montreal. The company 
manufacture wagons with a new patent 
wide tiro. 

Will HE COME U< l ANAPA? 

Mi \\ Sandford, of Lithgow, has been 
practically invited to transfer his iron 
working schemes to Canada, where he is 
assured of a better opportunity than the 
Commonwealth seems able to give him. 
Prom the secretary of the Voters' League 
at Victoria, British Columbia, he lias re 
eeived a letter sympathizing with him for 
the " damper which has been put upon 
lii- great enterprise in Australia." and 
assuring him that British Columbia is a 
finer field for carrying it t,. practical 
ka« materials of the finest qual 
n> are abundant and accessible. The op 

unties for Oriental tradi 
there as in Australia, and, in addition. 
there is the Dominion bonus, which the 
writer feels sure would be augumented by 
the Province if this was warranted \ 
companying the letter i- a report on the 
iron and steel resources of the Province. 

Australasian Hardware Machii 

THEIR PLANS livv I CH \M.i P. 

Vn echo of Mr. Clergue's statement 
garding the condition of the steel rail 
manufacturing business in Canada comes 
from the decision of The Dominion Iron 
and Steel Companj not to continue the 
on of their steel rail mills at 



nej . t ' It.. for 1 he lire en I . bul U 
them for manufai 1 111 ing jtrui tural 
for which the demand 1 verj good in 
< lauada. 

Had this been doi ae time ago the 

company would likelj have done a verj 

good iei i| tin- demand for -true 

tural materials lias been verj good foi 
some mont li Not beii ich unfaii 

competition with German manufacturer* 
as would be the case if rails were manu 
factured, there would also be much more 
profit to the companj in Btructutal steel 
It i- curious thai the machinery to be 
employed in the manufacture of structural 

steel will lie brought by The Dominion 

Iron and Steel Companj from Germany. 
It i- t hi >ug li 1 1 ha t manufact urii 
tious will com tice about May I. 



v IK-WHEEL WORKS I i>k MONTREAL. 

Montreal i- certainly going ahead with 
great rapidity in regard to manuiactur 
ing industries, the latest being the re 

building of the car wheel works at I. a 

chine, which, it will l>e remembered, were 
burned out some 5 eai ago. 

'The fire put a stop to the manufacture 
of wheels l>\ The Montreal Car-Wheel 
Company, but bj oexl spring the factorj 
will once more be in operation. 

'The c pany will operate on the old 

premises, near 'The Dominion Bridge Com 
pany's works. They will employ about 
100 men. and their capacity will be in the 
! hborhood of '■'" tons per day. 

All indications point to a most pro- 
sperous period during the next five years 
for the iron and - 1 .-< I manufacturers of 
Canada. It is expected that, aside from 
the Grand Trunk's trans-continental line, 
the railway building in Canada will ex- 
c I anything in the p 

The fact that there is not a railway 
operating in Canada today that has 
sufficient rolling stock to meet the in- 
creasing traffic, i- another point in favor 
of the rebuilding of these works. 

ORDERS FOR FRBIGH1 CARS. 

Hon \ G. Blaii ha- given an order f 01 
box and freight cars. iiu $400, 

111111 in amount, to lie divided between 
Rhodes. Currie a Co., of Amherst, \ S , 
and The Rathbun Co., of Deseronto, Ont. 
Nearh 500 of these cars an require 
the Intercolonial, and they mu-t be com 
plated early in the Bpring. The Minister 
of Railways will consult his colleagues 
with respect to the pui addition- 

al Pullmans and dining cat- for the I 
eminent line So heavv was the tourist 
traffic last year that the company could 
have put into use main- more of the-, 
ilas-,- of ' ars than it 1 ■■ 'The 

earning power of the Intercolonial hn- 
greatlj increased since Mr. Blair commen 
e.-d t,, improve and equip it on a modern 
1 Taking the period from July, 

1898 No mber, 1902, each successive 

month has -how n an increase over the 

ponding period of the pre\ ions 

Taking 
the section of railwaj from Halifax. N 

1M1 >n< ton, N.B ovei ■■ Inch both 
the C.P.R. and Intercolonial run. there 



1 time when s.-, |„ 

point 

went t,, i|„ I I' l: 

onlj 15 pei cent i" t he In'. 

Now the condition of thin 

and the 1 pie's lii the lion'i 

thai e 

ANNUAL BALL OF WESTERN 
TRAVELLERS. 
Prom our own lent 

r I^i 11 commercial travellers' ball at the 
L Alhambra Hall, Winnipeg, on Mon- 
day night was tin best yet given In tint 
Association. Everyone went in lot .1 i;.k>j 

lime, and had il. Tin- room looked 

inviting, with decorations, flags and burn- 
ing and a profusion of colored ek 
globes, The stage was fitted up a- h 
sitting-room, and with a screen ol palms 
made a delightful spot from which to 

view the dancers. The sit-in- was an ex- 

1 1 . dingh prcii\ one. 

Men were in llie majority, and although 

there were no doubt a sufficient numbei of 
chaperones, there were no wall Rowers in 

sierht. 

The Hour was in splendid condition, and 
the mush all that could he desired 

There were anj number ofpretrj gowns 
and prettj faces to go with them. Among 

so many frocks il was pretty hard lo indi- 
vidualize. Those noted were : Mrs, Fred 
Cox, cream satin with chiffon frills and 
berthe of rare lace ; Mr-. J Lamb, black 

silk with point lace revels ; Mrs. K. |„ 

Thomas, black grenadine with scarlet 

rosettes ; Mrs C. C". Macdonald, black 
chiffon with spraj poppies on corsage ; 
Mis- Callahan, gown of blue China silk 

and yolk and sleeves of chiffon embroidered 

with silver sequins ; Mrs. Arthur Congdon, 
silk organdie in Persian effect with sash 

and corsage knots and cerise satin ribbon; 
Miss Young, gown of cream louisine with 
yolk of embroidered chiffon and pearl 
ornaments ; Miss Wine. iris, pink chiffon 
Over pink taffeta ; Mis-, Landers, cream 

China silk with trimmings, silk applique ; 
Mrs. A. Dyke, handsome gown of black 
taffeta with sequin trimmings; Mis.. Mo- 
Sweeney, sea green crepoline over green 
taffeta ; Miss Martin, point desprii over 
bluette slip ; Mrs. Harrj Cox, sage green 
silk with panels of cream applique and 
berthe of green chiffon ; Mrs. J. \\\ Lord. 
black silk relieved b) a berthe of Brussels 
lace and touches of burnt orange, 

There was a preponderance i^t light- 
colored gowns, and. .is the majority of 
them were long, the effect of them when 
dancing was that of floating draperv, and 
was certainly very pretty. 

Slipper was served after the ninth daiHe. 

Numerous small gail) decorated tables 

wm set in the dining-hall on the second 
(loot, 1 he repast being served in 
Hamill's best style. As only half tin 
dancers went down al one time there was 
ample room. 

The committee, lo w hose untiring la 
the splendid success of the hall was due, 
was composed of R. M McGoWBfl 
(the newlv elected President of the 

N W v T \ II s. Rolston I s 
I- W. I. owe. J. M Lamb. F. M Morg 
.1. Heasley, W C. McLean, I. I.. 
Thomas, N Musgi W L. Lawler, 

.1- A. McTagi c 1 Macdonald, I-'. 

W. Drew rv . and J. Haffncr. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BANQUET OF THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., 

LIMITED. 



THE sixth annual banquet and reunion 
of the travellers and heads of depart- 
ments of the above firm was held 
Tuesday evening, December s.i. at La 
Corona Hotel, Montreal. The president, 
las. Davidson, acted ;i> chairman, and in 
a few well-chosen words proposed the 
health of " The King," which was received 
with musicaj honors. The health of "The 
Queen and Royal Family " was also duly 
honored. 

The toast of "The Head- of Depart- 
ments " was proposed by T. C. Davidson, 
vice-president, in a humorous speech, and 
was replied to by Owen Gee, whose re- 
marks were of a reminiscent character 
he having been with the firm since 1869. 

Edward Goodwill, managerof the sales 
department, proposed the toast of "Our 
Travellers." and, as he had toured Canada 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific, he spoke 
with a full knowledge of his suhject, and 
his interesting remarks received the closest 
attention, which they so well merited. 

H. B. Chadburn was the first to reply to 
this toast, and dwelt upon the loyalty of 
the travelling stall" to the interests of the 
firm. 

W. H. Morgan followed, and his re- 
marks had the ring of true patriotism. He 
hoped that the label "Made in Canada" 
would always be insisted upon by buyers 
in Canada, and prophesied that 1903 
would be the greatest year in the history 
of his firm. 

K. B. Cray, J. A. Crevier, L. B. Latour 
and J. X. Young also spoke along similar 
lines. 

The toast of "Canada " was eloquently 
P oposed bv Mr. Lachapelle, dwelling on 
the prosperity of Canada in general and 
the Thos. Davidson Manufacturing Co. in 
particular. 

James Chalmers, the artist who so suc- 

Cessfully designed the invitation cards and 

menus (which were lithographed on tin in 

many colors), referred to the Maple Leaf 

as the emblem of Canada, and recited the 

following original poem in connection 

therewith : 

" THE MAPLE LEAF." 

While sitting at this festive board 

And scanning all your faces, 

A pleasant thought occured to me 

Regarding different races. 

| ust fancy that we are the crew 

Of the good ship " Maple Leaf" 

That each one of us to-night's a jolly tar. 

more year we've been afloat 
On our staunch and sturdy boat 
And to-night she safely crossed the harbor liar. 

And John Bull is Captain. 

Batisii- sin is de mate — 

Pat, from Krin's Isle, is engineer, 

dj frae the land o' cakes, 
Chief Purser is. the cash he takes. 
While Davy J -nes.from Wales, the ship does steer. 



Though of different creeds and races, 
Bom in various climes and places, 

and, Ireland. Scotland, Prance and Wales, 
While lohnny Hull is chief 

( if the good ship " Maple Leaf " 

The world will find that harmony prevails 

But, while to-night in harbor 
Of the " Maple Leaf" we sing, 
There are other noble emblems 
Which to our hearts do cling, — 
Let us ne'er forget them 
When sailing o'er the foam. 
I mean the little emblem 
Of " Home Sweet Home." 

So here's to the Shamrock, the Thistle, the Rose, 

The Leek and the Fleur de Lis — 

Dear little emblems of our native lands 

Far away over the sea. 

We're sailing together 

In all kinds of weather, 

Still, our voyage through life is but brief 

So we'll pray — God bless them — 

To our hearts we will press them 

Along with the Maple Leaf. 

Jay. See. 

At the conclusion of the recitation all 
joined heartily in singing "The Maple 
Leaf for Ever. " 

Frank J. Barratt, in a neat speech, pro- 
posed the health of "The Ladies," which 
was replied to by E. Huot. 

P. Dechene moved a hearty vote of 
thanks to Jas. Williams, the superintendent 
of the factory, to whose indefatigable 
energy the success of the banquet was due. 
This vote was carried with great applause. 

J. N. Warminton then made a few- 
remarks relative to the wonderful growth 
of the lithographing department, and pro- 
posed the health of Mr. Bodfish and his 
staff. 

Mr. Bodfish, who has charge of this 
department, made a brief reply, stating 
that his old quarters having become too 
small for the volume of trade done in that 
line, he had been provided with new and 
improved facilities, being now located on 
the top floor of a building recently erected. 
The artists will now have the advantage of 
a well-lighted studio — the light being ad- 
mitted through a sky-light as well as by 
an abundance of windows. The litho- 
graphing department have the use of the 
whole flat, which will double their former 
floor space, and will enable them to 
materially increase their output during the 
coming year. 

J. N. Young, K. W. Leith, R. B. Cray, 
VVm. Jones and others, also spoke on 
matters of interest to (hose present. 

During theevening songs and recitations 
were contributed by Dr. A. W. Haldi- 
mand, W. Falconbridge, W. E. Barrat, C. 
I'. Clarke, C. Cartledge, J. A. Crevier, A. 
Owen Gee, J. Stump and Mr. Lachapelle. 
Dr. Haldimand's rich tenor voice was 
heard to good advantage, and he was 

repeatedly encored. C. P. Clarke's recita- 
tions were masterpieces of elocution, his 



rendering of Drummond's poems leaving 
nothing to be desired. The enjoyment of 
the evening was also enhanced by the 
presence of an efficient orchestra. 



DUTIES ON IRON AND STEEL. 

A meeting of the sub-committee of the 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association, ap- 
pointed to report on the proposed revision 
of iron and steel duties, was held in the 
Board of Trade Building, Toronto, a few- 
days ago. Frederic Nichols occupied the 
chair. There was an attendance of about 
30 manufacturers from Ontario and 
Quebec. It is understood that this will be 
the final meeting of the sub-committee to 
deal with the question of raw material, 
that subject having been disposed of, and 
the various views of the manufacturers 
reconciled. 

The sub-committee will now take up 
the question of the manufactured product, 
and when an agreement is reached on that 
a report will be made to the general 
committee. It is not expected that the 
latter body will be in a position to report 
upon the general question of the tariff till 
some time in Februarv. 



NEW MANUFACTURERS' AGENCY. 

Archie MacFarlane, who for the past 15 
years has occupied a position of trust with 
Caverhill, Learmont & Co., commenced in 
business for himself at the first of the year 
as a manufacturers' agent. He has se- 
cured several first-class agencies, particu- 
lars of which will be published later. 

In common with a great many others, 
who had met him in a business way in his 
former place, we bespeak for Mr. Mac- 
Farlane the good will of all connected with 
the trade, and with him a prosperous 
career. He is a young man of energy 
and ability, and he hopes, by confining his 
business entirely to the wholesale trade, to 
build up a large and valuable connection. 

His long association with Caverhill, 
Learmont & Co. will prove of the greatest 
value to him in his new venture, and he is 
thoroughly posted in all the details of the 
hardware business. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 

Prompt Shipmeau 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON QNT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



SPECIALTIES IN BRASS GOODS 

Tl 1 1". W.iui bur) Brass Co . Waterburj , 
Conn., and New York City, have 
made a specialt) foi years oi draw- 
ing and spinning brass and also wide brass, 
bul with iluii new equipment are able to 
..m\ in stock in New York brass up to 
2 I in. wide, and the) purpose installing a 
-imk oi drawing brass in standard width-- 
and gauges for the convenience oi the 
trade and also spinning brass from t to 24 
in. wide. Theii stock will run as follows: 
I- "'in i to l I in. wide, thej will carrj 16 
I! i\ S gauge toand including 'M> I! >\ s ; 
16 in. wide, from Is B & S to 32 B & S : 
18 in. wide, from is B & S to 26 B .\ S ; 
20, 22 and -J I in. wide, from 18 B & S to 
26 I! & s. This is a large and complete 
assortment oi drawing and spinning brass 
and will be there lor shipment and deliver) 
immediate!) on receipt oi order, and will 
give the users oi this class of material a 
stock to draw against. They will also 
instal a stock oi spinning copper in rolls 
from I l' to 20 in. wide in various thick- 
nesses in I! & S gauge. 

There lias been such a demand among 
the hardware trade and manufacturers of 
special hardware that they will instal a 
stock ol sheet brass and sheet bronze in 
Hat sheets in widths from fi to II in. 
wide in random lengths about »> ft. long 
to meet the demand for finger and kicke 
plates, and will rarry this in quite a large 
variety oi thicknesses in I!. & S. gauge. 

They have increased their stock oi brass 

rods material!) and are now carrying free 

turning brass rods from \ to I in. by 
32nds and up to 2 5< in. in diameter by 
Itiths from 1 in. Their stock in hexagon 
rods is quite complete for free turning or 
drilling rod; the) are all straight and 
true to size. The) are having a large 

trade in their Pope's Island white metal 

which is non-corrosive and there is a 

permanency of color that meets the 
demand for purposes in covering sink 
bo.uds, for pantries and bar fixtures and 

passenger coaches and lavatories. 
The metal is very ductile. Their stock 

oi sheet copper, both cold rolled and soft 
will be somewhat increased as to other 
si/es that the demand calls tor, and also 
what the) have said in regard to other 
material may apply to their soldering 
coppers. The) carr) seamless brass 
chisel handle ferrules. sheet brass 
grommets, screwdriver handle ferrules 

anci eyelets and also brass checks in stock 
lure. 

FEAST THEIR STAFF. 

II. S. Howland, Sons \ Co., Toronto, 
entertain to-da) (Saturday, January :i), 

their travelling staff and their heads oi 



k Varnish Announcement. 



We have organized a regular varnish department to push D 
rapidly than ever our varnish sales. 

We purpose to co-operate more fully with our dealers in going 
after varnish business. We are in a position to give them any and 
every special help to increase their varnish sales. 

We are putting the same progressive advertising spirit into the 
sale of our varnish thai has proved so successful in our paint. 

( )ur plans for the year are the most complete and effective we 
can devise. 

Our varnishes are right — always. 

If you are not handling our varnishes, write for the " B-13" 
Booklet. It gives our varnish proposition. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
CHICAGO, NEWARK, BOSTON. SAN FRANCI8C0. 

NEW YORK, MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY. 





departments, to dinner at the National 
Club, Toronto. The best 6f good feeling 
exists between this firm and its members 
and has much increased during the past 
year. Harmony prevails amongst all its 
members. 

TRAVELLERS' GRIEVANCES. 

(Special Prom our own Correspondent I 

Winnipeg, December 29. Amassmeet- 

iiii; oi travellers and business men was 
held on Saturday evening when the follow- 
ing was passed unanimously after an ani- 
mated discussion : 

Whereas, disorganization of passenger train ser- 
vice has caused not only great personal discomfort 
and pecuniary loss to the travelling public, and 
especially to commercial men. but has also brought 
its attendant loss to business classes ; 

Whereas, no attention is given by railway cor- 
porations to complaints of inefficiency of train 
service ; 

I herefore. be it resolved that this meeting is of 
the opinion thai a committee should immediately be 
appointed to interview proper authorities of our 
transportation comptnies with .1 view of obtain- 
ing better accommodation for the travelling public . 

v* hereas. travellers cannot secure in many towns 
proper hotel accommodation, be it resolved that a 
committee he appointed to approach the pre per 
officials of the Government of Manitoba, and 
Territorial ' Assembly regarding hotel 

accommodation throughout the country; be it 
further resolved that if no satisfaction lie given to 
committees appointed thai tructed to 

call another meeting for tin- purpose of taking 
stronger measures to procure needed reforms in 
train service and hotel accommodation. 



MR M'DOUGALL A BENEDICT. 
Mr. ,\. \V. McDougall, oi The Rice 
Lewis Co., Limited, of Toronto, was mar- 
ried on January I, i!in:5. On the dav pre- 
ceding his marriage the travellers and 
employes generally presented him with a 
handsome cabinet oi cutlery. Mr. \. K. 
C.ilverson made the presentation on behalf 
of the stall'. Mr. McDougall replied briefly, 
expressing the hope that the pleasant ,,1 ,- 
lions which had existed between himself 
and the firm for the last I -i years would 

increase in the future. 



HOCKEY STICKS AND SKATES. 

II. S. Howland. Sons & Co. are pleased 
to inform the trade that they have just 
received a fresh shipment of "Mic-M 
hockev sticks. There will, oi course, In- 
still big sales oi sticks and the trade will 
be glad to know that thev will be able to 
receive a fresh supply. This linn also 
state that their slock oi skates is well 
assorted and thev are still able to SUppI) 
the trade in this line. Thev prepared for 

a large business in these this year and have 

not been disappointed. 



INQUIRIES AND ANSWERS. 

A subscriber wants to know the name 

oi 1 he manufacturei oi the Elgin S. 

wrench. Can any of our readers supplv 
the desired information .' 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICl I III- ASSIGNMENTS, < Oil 
PROMISES 

1)1111 IAS BORDI vs. wood and lumber 
merchant, Longueuil, Que., is offer 
ing to compromise, 
nl Lapierre, contractor, Montreal, 
has assigned. 

A Desmarteau is curator of Celestin 

Beaulieu, general merchant, St. Agathe 

llonts, Qua 

Joseph Forciere, general merchant, of 

Anne d.'s l'laiins. Que., has, as 

curator. Notarj Villeneuve. 

Thomas Dulac, general merchant, of St. 
Victor de Tring, Que., .is ottering to com- 
promise at 25c. on the dollar. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND 
DISSOLVED. 

John B. Foster retires, and S. <i. Mor- 
ton continues under the old style. 

Vexina & Goneau, general merchants. >>i 
Three Rivers, Que., have dissolved. 

Cummings & Black, lumber merchants, 
Grand View, Man., have dissolved; Cum- 
mings continues. 

Colby, Scott iV Co., manufacturers of 
hay and stork racks, Chatham, Ont., have 
dissolved; Jacob Colby retires 

SALES MADE AND PENDING 

The assets oi Laveau & Cie., hardware 
merchants, Quebec, are to be sold. 

Owen Bros., saw millers, Richard's Land- 
ing, Ont., are advertising their business 
for sale. 

The assets of J. D. Lacerte, general mer- 
chant and wholesale leather dealer, of 
Plessisville, Que., are to be sold. 

CHANGES. 

Phil. Morin it Cie, general merchants, 
.i St. lite, Que., have registered. 

J. W. Low. general merchant, Russell, 
Ont., has opened up a branch at Med- 
calfe. 

T. R. Constantine, general merchant, of 
Elgin, Man., is succeeded by Constantine 
& Steeves. 

Robert Frederick Campbell and Alexan- 
dei Allan, of Calgary, N.W.T., have re- 
gistered as proprietors under the style of 
R. F. Campbell & Co.", manufacturers of 
mattresses, Vancouver, B.C. 

BTRES. 

\. Comeault, general merchant, Letcl- 
lier, Man., has been burned out. 

Leiser & Hamburg aeral merchanls, 

Ladysmith, B.C., have been burned out. 

Caleb Morn-., general merchant, Advo- 
cate Harbor, N.S., has been burned out. 

Blackney Bros. eV Co., general mer- 
chants, of Petitcodiac, \ li , have been 
burned out. 

William Warcup, general merchant, Kin- 
near's Falls, Que., has been burned out; 
partially insured. 

The stock of L. Galibert, wholi 
leather dealer, Montreal, was damaged by 
fire ati<l water; insured. 

DEATHS. 

V Breton, earriagemaker, St. Francois, 
N.lv. Que., is dead. 

Clarence Primrose, of Primrose Bros., 
Pictou, VS.. i~ dead. 

B icage, contractor, of St. 
Alban, Que., is dead. 

(.'has. W. De Wolfe, of De Wolfe & Dens- 
more, hardware merchants. St. Stephen, 

I', i- dead. 




[EN HUNDRED AND THREE 

finds us better prepared than ever before to give our patrons prompt 
service, and products of superior merit and quality. Enlarged facilities, 
additional automatic machinery, perfected systems and methods have 
become a necessity during the past year, through the ever-increasing 
demand for . . . 

IVER JOHNSON 

Revolvers, Guns and Bicycles. 

Availing ourselves of a seasonable privilege, we desire not 
only to thank our friends in the trade for past favors, but 
to extend to them greetings for a most 

Prosperous New Year. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



New York Salesroom : 99 Chambers St. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 



THE CELEBRATED 



NATIONAL CUTLERY CO. SHEARS 

Acknowledged the best and fully warranted. 
Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, 
Ladles' Scissors, 
Barbers' Shea's, 
THrers' Snips. 



DECATUR, BULL & CO., SE 




Who Comes 
Here ? 



This, our friends, is the genial sales- 
man for The Alabastine Company. The 
story he has to tell may seem some- 
what familiar — nevertheless, he has new 
features that will interest you. Listen 
attentively to what he may have to say. 

If in need of goods, and cannot wait 
for him, send in your order by mail. 

The trade supplied by Wholesale 
Hardware and Faint Dealers. 



The Alabastine 
Co., Limited, 

PARIS, ONT. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 



BOKER'S SKATES 



LIMITED 

ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



MAIL OR 
TELEGRAM 

ORDERS 

FILLED 

PROMPTLY 




N.. 



BOKER'S SPRING SKATES 

i. i >r.liiiiir> Fini-I. 



Nos. 



BOKER'S LADIES' SKATES 



' Crescent," 1' 
X I I-"-'. "Charm," 
£z) ll-l "Daisy," 



BOKER'S HOCKEY.SKATES 

Nos. 

"Hockey," Ordinary Quality, rices, : to 12 in. 
516. " Full Plated, 



BOKER'S HOCKEY SKATES 

Nos. 

581. "Royal Hockey." Blui 

Full Plated, •■ en 



BOKER'S HOCKEY SKATES 

Nos. 

681. "Perfect," Blued ■ 10 to 12 In. 

682. •' Full Plated, 10,11, U 



BOKER'S HOCKEY SKATES 

No. 

SM "Model," lull Plated ; i' . In. 



BOKER'S HOCKEY SKATES 
So. aUc-afac Pattern. 

Dominion," Full I'lat, ll^iii. 



No. 



BOKER'S HOCKEY SKATES 



Lightning," Full ]•'.. u i„ 



FOR FULLER PARTICULARS OF BOKER S SKATES. SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. u- ED , Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY. 



Graham Nails ara the Best. 

Faotory I OufTe>rln Street. TororSt 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIOHT. 



Ill 



CANADfAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLY 

DEPARTMENT 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES 



T 



l lll". (turn Sound Iron Works Com-' 
pany, Limited, are putting new 

plates on the bow of the steam- 
barge Algonquin, and have the contract 
eneral repairs to that vessel and her 
sister ship Kosedale. 

It is estimated that more steel is used 
in the manufacture of pens than in all the 
sword and gun factories in the world. 

A large drilling machine was shipped to 
The Gray and Bruce Portland Cement Co., 
of Owen Sound, by H. W. Petrie, Toronto. 

The Hamilton Brass Manufacturing Co. 
imir The Colonial Construction Co., 
of Toronto, lor $2,000 darngaes for alleg- 
ed breach of contract. 

John Clark, superintendent of The Ham- 
burg Manufacturing Company, Brandon, 
.Man., is on a visit to Ontario to buy 
machinery for a new planing mill. 

The Montrose Paper Co., of Thorold, 
Out., have installed a 110 H.-P. boiler 
to furnish power for their plant, which 
was purchased from H. W. Petrie, of To- 
ronto. 

A suspension drill and two 23-in. Barnes 
drills have been added to the plant of 
The Taylor Safe Works, Toronto. These 
machine- were installed by H. W. Petrie, 
Toronto. 

The Buffalo Tool and Machine Company, 
Bay street, 'Toronto, have sold a Brown 
gasoline engine, a buzz planer, a variety 
saw table and a swing saw to G. S. Rog- 
er-. f Thedford, Ont. 

Thomas Kennedy is installing twenty 

u 1 working machines in his factory at 

Fort William. Ont. H. H. Dale, of the 
-ame place, also intends to add machinery 
to hi- sa>h and door factory. 

Kerr >v Coombs, iron founder-, of Ham- 
ilton, Ont., have bought the premises 
formerly owned by Copp Bros., in Ham 
ilton. They expect to move into these 
works next week, when they will increase 
their staff until it is double the number 
now employed. 

'The International Harvester Company, 
who are . recti ng immense works near 
Hamilton. Out., to manufacture Deering 
ultural implements, purchased 35 
more acres of land la-t week, paying 
about 938,600, and bave announced that 
they will make their work- even larger 
than at first proposed. 

.1. I'. Tilley, Victoria, B.C., and Harvey 
Mitchell. \ew Brun-wick. have Bigned con 



tract- lo go | South Africa to instruct 
farmers in dairying methods and to super- 
vise the establishment of butter and 
cheese factories. These gentlemen should 
lie able to place agencies for Canadian 
dairying and agricultural machinery. 

While working at a bench on which a 
can of gasoline oil stood, a workman, 
named A. Poirier, in Montreal, allowed a 
lamp too near the gasoline. An explosion 
followed, causing severe burns about the 
face and arms of the workman. 

A despatch from Toronto Junction, 
Out., says that a newly-organized com- 
pany, which intends to go into the manu- 
facture of cement bricks, will in all prob- 
ability locate at or near Toronto Junc- 
tion. It is proposed to erect a building 
80 x 300 ft., which will be equipped with 
the most up-to-date machinery, and 30 to 
■10 hands will be employed when the works 
are in running order. 

It is a common practice to make the 
steering axles for automobiles of solid 
forgings with forks or sockets at the 
ends for receiving the steering knuckles, 
says Scientific American. This renders a 
heavy and expensive axle for the strength 
required. L. G. Nilson. of New York, has 
invented an axle to overcome these diffi- 
culties by providing an axle that shall 
be comparatively light, with sufficient 
strength, and so constructed that the 
knuckles and springs may be easily fast- 
ened in place. 

In reply to an inquiry as to how to 
obtain red cherry color on pure copper, 
done by immersion in hot acid, not by 
battery or dynamo. The Scientific Amer 
ican says "A color of this kind in cop- 
per can be obtained by slowly heating 
in an air bath, with gradually rising tem- 
perature. Long beating at a compara- 
tively low temperature will give the same 
effect. As soon as the desired color is 
obtained, cool rapidly by plunging into 
cold water. If lacquered after finishing, 
it will keep better.", 

'The legal difficulty m the way of Co 
ronto granting exemptions, making 
streets, etc., and giving free land to The 
'Toronto Steel Company, for the estab- 
lishing <>f rolling mills, has been over 
by the decision on the part of the 
Toronto City Council to make the street-. 

etc.. as a public benefit, not as for the 
particular benefit of the proposed mills. 
\- this comprises the bulk of the intended 
inducements offered to 'The 'Toronto Steel 
Company it is now thought there will be 



no difficulty about the establishment of 
their works in 'Toronto. 

BICYCLES AND ACCESSORIES. 

During the present season 'The Yar 
mouth, N.S., Cycle Company will be re 
presented on the road by E, Et. Penwick. 
of St. John, N.B., and P. E. Armour, of 
Chariot (down, P.E.I, 'This firm do a 
wholesale business in bicycles and acces- 
sories, and arc Canadian agents for The 
Columbia Phonograph Company., of New 
York ; and Maritime agents for 'The Dur- 
ham Rubber Company, makers of the 
"Darlington" tires. They arc fully equip 
ped for all kinds of repair work and carry 
a w ell assorted stock, so should readily 
increase their connection in the eastern 
Provinces. Hardware dealers wanting 

| I lines to handle should get into touch 

with this house. 

CEMENT WORKS NEAR BELLEVILLE. 

'The Belleville Portland Cement Com- 
pany have decided to erect their plant at 
Port Ann. near Belleville, Ont. This com- 
pany has just been incorporated with a 
capital stock of $2,500,000. It will be 
one of the largest mills in the world and 
will turn out as much cement as all the 
mills in Canada together. Prof. Carpen- 
ter, the expert, who examined the com- 
pany's property. expresses the opinion 
that there is enough material quarried 
to manufacture from 000,000 to 1,000,000 
barrels of cement. Much of this material 
is reduced to a fine condition and will 
Save in the cost of manufacturing fully 
5c. per barrel. He estimates the value of 
the material quarried will save the plant 
$60,000 during tin' construction of the 
buildings and the first year of operation. 
He Says, also, that the works are very 
favorably situated for the shipment of 
coal by water, owing to the large quant- 
ity of coal needed for the manufacture of 
fuel. 

WILL MAKE IRON AND STEEL 
GOODS. 

The Centrifugal Windmill and Blanufac 

turiiiL: Company. Limited, with a capital 
stock of $20,000, headquarters &i Guelph, 
Ont., will manufacture windmills, towers, 
tanks, pumps. anvils, hammock chair-, 
and novelties in steel. iron and wood. 

'The charter members are George Alvin 
Black, agent : Francois Xavier Franks, 
<oal merchant ; bonis Conrad Wiseman, 
architect; George Kickley, manufacturer, 
and George l> Pringle, jeweller, all of 
Guelph, Out. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



IT 




Will Hold Up a Shelf! 

That' a what asheiriiruc k«-i I 

For this purpose t here run l.e 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

than tlii' .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

n ii will Japanned, Strong, and Light- 
i in- goring in freight Is a good proBl 
Iroin Hie lower price »' "Men the goods aro sold. 

»#- Order ill reel or through your Jnhher. 

aTLAS MFO. CO.. New Haven. Conn.. U.S.*. 



ANNEXATION 8AU 

.. ..i m. .tin*' thi following in.i. I irj <• 

v. I .mi prepared i eke rerv close ii. u 

in I'll \ STEAM II MPS 
:: in \ 2 in i 3 In Northi » Co IJ-ta roc 1 in rtla 
|j in \ I in " 'J in " P in " 

6 in Martin In .li- 

8 in \ I in x 7 iii < " 21-in. 

7l-in x l' ii. ; '" 

>l\,.l I \. I 1\.. II MI'S 
21 ii. x 6 in S" -" Blake i; In mc 1 In dla 
Sfin x l I .'• 16 in x 'i in v. m Pljr Wheel)] in sue I In di- 
ll in x :' ii. x I in Buckel Pump r In roc l ir 
16 in x I" I 

;, i M x 3 III .lis 

ELE< TRII M M HIM :i:\ 
ii p. Mo i ddj make 

., ii i' .■ ..i Johnson make 

•j ll P lln make 

411 || P ■ i ... I nil. .1 El Co make 

15 I.i-Ih Dynamo ll« rolls BeatU make 
,i " a B a E m.ik. 

lln ■ Gee El ( o 
BROOM ll INDI l M M HINEH 

]> n ll. in. Hi- Rumblei si i M In i .'-' In 

" 36 In. I 48-in. 
mi. I Rod machine, 
Boring and rounding machine. 
Handle and Spoke sawing machine. 
M.'iitMj stock .ni'l prloea lenl on raquetl 

H. W. PETRIE 

131-3-.">-7-'.>-14l-4W.J Pronl SI Weal and 

1 10 IS ii It 18 20 33 Btotior Bl . TORONTO 



DIAMOND VISE AND DRILLING ATTACHMENT. 



^1> 
%$& 

Blacksmiths' 

Hand 

Drills, 

The very 
best. 

B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 





BUY 

KERR 

VALVES 

give 

satisfaction 

every time. 

Catalogue 
on application. 



] The Kerr Engine Go. 



Walkerville, Ont. 



i - patent Jan 18,'W Canadian Patent Jul) 




JAWS are laced will de, 4 Inches long, 

ilrmly fastened to Jaw, . hex k.-.i ami hardened 
VIBE weighs U pounds. DRILL weighs ISpoands, 
h'nr Bale i'v Jobber! of Hardware. 

Made bj 

The Adams Company, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
Mad ■ liy Taylor-Forbes Co., Limited, Guelpb.Ont. 




ft 



THE PEERLESS" 



ll the best Bolster Spring overproduced. A fine 
line for the hardware trade. Write Us for Prices. 




JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of~ 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 

H. W. Petrle 141-146 Front street West, TORONTO -Selling Agent. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS, 

ST. MARYS, ONT.. CANADA. 

"Maxwell Favorite Churn" 



Steel Frame Churn. 



Patented Features: Improved Steel 
Stand, Roller Hearings, and I oot 
and Hand Lever Drive, and Detach- 
able Driving Link Impioved for 
season of 1903. Steel or Wood 
Frame as desired. 




LAWN MOWERS. 

HiRli and Low Wheels, from 12 in to 20-in. widths. 
Cold Rolled Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 'THE MAX WELL" Lawn Mower 
articles IHk'h Wheel 10 i' 

SEND DIRECT TO VS. 





WheelbarrOWS. 'n four different sizes. 



MAXWtLL MOWEB 
<lr.li Low Wheel 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BRAZING CAST IRON. 

H\ W \i:i>. of The American Bra/ 
1 1 1 ._; Company, Philadelphia, states 
that by the discover) of the new 

ss of brazing cast iron has changed 
the methods in European foundries with 

nee to complicated castings, espe 
dally in the case of large castings whore 
;l Hau or imperfection <»f any kind in 
vplved the relegation of the pier.- to the 
scrap pile. The patterns were n<>\\ cut 
into two or more parts, so that each 
was a simple piece to mould, and the -r\ 
oral parts that went to make up the 
whole won- brazed together, so that in 
effect when the brazing operation was 
complete, the several pieces that went to 
make up the whole casting were as one 
entire casting, and the cost of production 
had been reduced, in that the cost of 
brazing was very much less than theci -t 
of moulding one large casting. Mr. 
Ward explained that flaws in castings 
were eliminated by drilling them out if 
they wore small, and brazing in a plug 
made to fit the hole. If they were large 
and in i lie nature of a crack, and if the 
crack was wide, a piece of any kind of 
iron was fitted into the spare and brazed 
into place. If narrow, the track was 
cleaned out thoroughly and brazed up. If 
it was so that it could not be cleaned in 
this way. the fracture was extended by 
hammering until the entire break could be 
reached to clean, even if this involved 
breaking the piece entirely in two. The 
cost of the Ferrofix involved was about 
half a cent per square inch of surface 
brazed. 

In tests made for the Government in 
Berlin, at the Stevens' Institute at Flo 
boken, at the University of California. 
and by the Pennsylvania Railroad, it had 
been demonstrated, he -aid. that the 
brazed joint was not only stronger than 
any portion of the casting- of equal sec- 
tion, but that the iron adjacent to the 
joint had it- strength increased percep- 
tibly, tin- tensile strength being raised 
from 50 to 200 lb., and the traverse 
strength as much as 2,000 lb. it was be- 
lieved that this was not due to any ac- 
tion of the chemical on the iron, but was 
entirely owing to the fact that in cooling 
down from the brazing heat, this cooling 
down was much more rapid than when 
the casting was originally made, the 
effect on the iron being to increase its 
strength by reason of this more rapid 
cooling. 

MAY CHEAPEN BLACK TINPLATE. 

The officials and directors of The United 
States Steel Corporation, during then- re 
cent inspection of plant-, visited the 
Monongahela works of The American Tin 
Plate Company, to inspect the new equip 
meat being built, for the purpose of roll 
lack plate at what is expected to 
much lower cost. This new methoJ 



is the invention <>f Charles W. Bray, chief 
engineer of The American Tin Plate Com- 
pany, and if it proses successful, is ex- 
pected to cm the present cosl of rolling 
black plate more than half. The new 

equipment has not I □ completely in 

stalled, and it will not be known for 
some tunc whether the new method is a 
-access. 

MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES 
CATALOGUES. 

ENGLISH MOTORS AND ALTERNATORS. 

We have received from The Fuller-Wens 
trom Electrical Manufacturing Company, 
11(1 Cannon street. London, Eng., copies 
of their recent price lists on continuous 
current motors, poly-phase motors, and 
of alternators, for the manufacture of 
which this firm have obtained a wide 
world reputation. Liberal discounts are 
offered to the trade. Copies of these price 
lists will be sent to any of the Canadian 
trade, and mentioning " Hardware and 
Metal." 

PREPARATION MACHINERY. 

\ catalogue that will be of interest and 
value to millmen and houses selling mill 
machinery has been issued by Henry 
Livesey, Limited, Blackburn, Eng. The 
machines included in this work are cop, 
drum and firm winding machines, wind- 
ing frames, twirling and drawing-in frame, 
cloth-plaiting machines, hydraulic cloth 
press, slasher, and cool-air sizing ma- 
chines, bobbins, etc. As this firm is one 
of the most progressive makers of looms 
and textile machinery in the world, all 
millmen and supply houses should see their 
catalogues which can be had by any 
" Hardware and Metal" reader. 



FOR BRAZING BRASS TO COPPER 

This formula for brazing brass to cop- 
per is very useful. The solder which 
unites the two metals must be soft brass, 
which will melt much easier than the 
brass which is to be joined to the copper, 
otherwise the work would melt at the 
same time as the solder. The edges of 
the work must be carefully cleaned, and 
then the parts brought together into their 
proper place and secured with iron wire. 
The flux to be used is borax, rubbed up 
in water until it is like a fine cream. The 
solder, which may be in the form of 
beads, strips, or wire, is next distributed 
along the joint. The amount of heat 
and the method of applying depend en- 
tirely upon the size of the work to be 
done. If the work is small, the blowpipe 
is by far the most convenient and safest, 
because if the heat is too great there is 
danger that the brass part of the work 
will bo melted. The heat is to be applied 
until the solder melts. As soon as the 
solder melts or "Hushes" the work should 



Ik- struck, so as to jar it just enough to 
make the solder flow into the joint. To 
find out whether the solder is soft en- 
ough for the work a piece may be laid 
upon a bit of brass of the same kind as 
that of which the work is made, and put 
it into the fire. If the solder melts con- 
siderably sooner than the brass it will be 
safe to use it for the work. If, on the 
other hand, they both melt about the 
same time, a softer solder will be needed. 
Spelter solder may also be used for the 
purpose. 

TO PREVENT SMOKE AND INCREASE 
HEAT. 

A simple but successful remedy for 
smoke has been brought to notice by a 
British engineer. It is known as the Wil- 
son smokeless process, and it consists in 
injecting a mixture of air and nitrate of 
soda solution on the fire. Though the 
first trial was crude, with dirty soft coal 
under a Babcoek boiler, the dense smoke 
from the chimney was reduced to invisi- 
bility. Tested further, the smoke was not 
only cured, but there was an increase of 
more than 20 per cent, in the output of 
the boiler and its evaporative efficiency. 
The theory advanced is that the solution 
of nitrate of soda creates nuclei of intense 
heat which fire the gases and enable the 
injected air to combine with them. 

ELECTRIC MOTORS IN ROLLING 
MILLS. 

ELECTRIC motors are now used in 
many of the large rolling mills of 
Europe, where their operation has 
proved very successful. The Nordisk 
Mills at Stockholm have been using elec- 
tric power for some time past. Another 
application of electric motors to operate 
steel-plate mills is at The Antwerp Steel 
Works, where a plant has been lately in- 
stalled. The current is furnished from the 
new central station erected by The Ant- 
werp Electric Company, to produce 25.00(1 
horse-power each at 2,200 volts. At the 
stool works both high and low tension are 
used for the motors. A number of small 
motors drive different apparatus, such as 
travelling cranes, shears, small rolls, etc.. 
and those all take current at 200 volts, 
which is fed from transformers. The large 
rolls, however, use the main current at 
2.2(1(1 volts without transformation, em- 
ploying non-synchronous motors which 
work at variable speed. One of the larg- 
est rolls, turning at 70 revolutions, and 
having a 30-ton flywheel, is operated by 
bolt from 325 H.-P. motor, and a second 
roll, the heaviest in the plant, has a 450 
II I'. motor. — Machinery World. 

Louis A. Schneider has established a 
plant for the manufacture of jewellery at 
Orillia, Ont. The machinery, including 
engine and boiler, a lathe, drill press and 
emery stand was furnished by H. W. Pe- 
trie, of Toronto. 



ANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 







f**J^i> 



■iS}? 







Cleveland 
^ "Bicycles. 




* 




' 



rjr * * rlrrtr * * * * * * fc 

* 
4 

* 

* 
4 

4 

tlijqimic Cushion frame. ^ 



'Better than ever, always 
the best." 



"The invention that regingered wheeling." 

This is Cushion F"rame Year. 

AGENTS WANTED IN ALL UNOCCUPIED TERRITORY. 

Canada Cycle and Motor Co., Limited 

Toronto Junction, Canada. 



* 
* 

* 



*-, »»«.,. » r », < »j«. t< »»«*<•• 4* 4* 4*4* •1*4*4*4*4*4* 4*4*4*4*4* 4* 4* *^ 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* X 



^ Aiiy,AiAAt4A.lkAity,AktkiA4UAi>L.iAitAAiiAttAli i^ 



The Auer 
Gas Lamp 

"Turns i. ght-tlme 




into day-time." 



Nch Models. 



Lower PrK «--.. 



1 



Would you buy a lamp which 

doesn't smell or smoke ? 

Would you buy a lamp which 

will save you 

half vour ex ■ 



pe n se 
co.il oil 



? for ^2^ 



m Would you buy 
a lamp which 
shows your 
goods in day- 
light colors ? 




No. 29 
200 Candle Power. 



Would you buy B lamp which you can return, [or tul 

if you don't like it? 
That's the kind of a lamp we make. 

EVERY LAMP GUARANTEED 
Write for our Catalogue and Discounts. 




AUER LIGHT CO.. 1682 NOTRE DAME ST., MONTREAL 



Copper Co., Limited 



Booth 

1 

Cuts 

Copper and Brass 



SHEETS-TUBES RODS 



to any size. 

FULL STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND. 
PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 



The BOOTH COPPER CO., Limited 



iiq-133 Queen St. East, 

TORONTO 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



■ INSOLVENCY LEGISLATION 




An Address on the Subject by 
Duncan M. Stewart, General 
Manager oi The Sovereign 
Bank. 



MR STEWART'S reply was ae fol 
lows : Before coming directly u> 
the subject, I wish to pay my trib- 
dte to the excellence «>i" your annual re- 
port, and more especially your financial 
lent. Balance sheets are to a 
banker whal a compass is to a mariner 
—provided they are correct. 

Its chiti characteristics are clearness and 
noncinennss and reflect credit alike on 
your treasurer and the excellence of your 
system of bookkeeping. 

There are just two points I wish to 
dwell upon, but very briefly. The first 
of these. I am very glad to observe from 
the published report >f your annual meet- 
ing, has been taken up by this Associa- 
tion, vi/.: "Insolvency Legislation." 

It is only within the past month or so 
that a prominent commercial body in 
England placed itself publicly on record 
as stating that trade between England 
and Canada was retarded by the absence 
of a proper bankruptcy law in this coun- 
try. I do not know to what extent this 
may be the case, but I can easily under- 
stand that the existing conditions here 
might lead to a considerable restriction in 
trade between the two countries, because 
in England they have been accustomed to 
bankruptcy Acts for generations, and even 
the laws of the commercial world respect 
ing bills and notes trace their origin 
mainly to bankruptcy Acts, 

I think we are agreed that the present 
system, by which each Province operates 
under a different insolvency Act is not 
satisfactory to the commercial interests of 
Canada, any more than it is to the mer- 
cantile communitv of Great Britain. What 

is i ded is uniformity of practice, and 

this. I think, can-only be secured by hav- 
■ ne insolvency Act operative through- 
out the entire country and passed by the 
Dominion Parliament. 

Without going into the history of in- 
solvency legislation in Canada, I may say 
that in my judgment, the Bill introduced 
by Dr. Fortin, member for the Dominion 
House, two years ago, is, on the whole, 
the most satisfactory which has been pro- 
posed for manj years. When the Bill was 

first introduced, it created a great deal 

of discussion, and a most unfortunate, as 
well as unfair, impression became pre- 
valent that the banks were opposed to it. 
One or two bankers may have op] 
it, but bankers are only human, and dift' 
Bncee of opinion exist between them, just 
■ me a- thej do amongsl other mem- 
ommercial community. 
1 think, however, I am s a f(. in saying 
in a broad sense, that the interests of the 
banks and the commercial community ate 
so inextricably associated and dependent 
one upon the other, that any measure 
that is beneficial to the trade and com 
of the country cannot injuriouslv 
affect the chartered banks, and I am sure 
ood banker would oppose it. The 
two main points in previous insolvency 

which the banks generally op] 
were: { I i Deprivation of the ri<_rht to 
claim 1\ ent for the full 

amount of paper discounted, whether in 
the form of- direct loans or customers' 
2 The granting of discharge 
to insolvent who have not paid a reas- 
onable amount on the dollar to creditors. 



\iiii lir I ortin's Bill was introduced in 
the House of Commons, the bankers met 
the representatives of the leading boards 
of trade, who were acting in the inter- 
ests of the merchants, and a satisfactory 
understanding arrived at on the points 
mentioned. After that nothing more was 
heard of the Insolvency Act. It has got 
to come, however, and the sooner the bet- 
ter. Insolvency legislation involves a 
great ileal more than the mere private in- 
terests of corporations or individuals, and 
I consider a question of morals. We 
should all unite therefore in the interests 
of the commonwealth in securing an Act 
which will at least have these two fea- 
Lures distinctly prominent, vi/.: The dis- 
couragement of reckless trading: and the 
absolute impossibility of a fraudulent in- 
solvent benefiting pecuniarly by his dis- 
honesty. 

I have spoken longer than 1 intended, 
but with your kind indulgence I will refer 
for only a moment to my one other 
point, and I do so because I am impelled 
to it by a sense of duty, which this op- 
portunity perhaps renders more than ord- 
inarily incumbent. I refer to the subject 
of stock speculation. Gentlemen, you 
have no idea of the vyide extent of this 
pernicious evil. Tt exists in banks, whole- 
sale houses, shipping offices, and even 
amongst the farming community, and I 
feel that a word of warning may not be 
out of place here. For the benefit of the 
young men of the commercial world, I 
would say that I have never known a 
man of ordinary ability who worked hard 
and attended strictly to his own business, 
who did not make a success, whereas it 
is within the experience of most of us to 
know men of more than average ability 
and brains who have been swamped in 
the vortex of the stock market, who 
might have been princes among merchants 
hail they devoted all their energies and 
abilities to the business they understood. 

GRATIFYING INCREASE. 

In your annual report T find that the 
increase in the membership of the Domin- 
ion Travellers' Association is greater 
than any previous year since 1882; and 
reflects the great activity and growth of 
the wholesale trade, consequent upon the 
increased settlement and development of 
the resources of our country. I con- 
gratulate you upon the increase in your 
membership, but. as you know, the re- 
sults of our magnificent harvests and the 
benefits derived from the general expan- 
sion of business have not 'been confined 
to any one class or section of the com- 
munitv. The prosperity has Keen wide 
pread and pretty generally distributed, 
and what i- more, I can see no good reas- 
on for believing that in the near future 
going to have a halt in this on- 
ward march <>f progress. Canada holds 
out inducements to the nouns' man to- 
day thai cannot be excelled, if. indeed, 
equalled, by any rountry in the world. 
But to be successful he must learn to earn 
his bread "by tie sweat of his brow " ; 
he must learn some one line of bu-i 
stick to that aiid in;, rei it. and he must 
carve his W av upward and onward by 
lard work, which is the only royal road 
M annot do this and have 
his mind on tie- stock market, but in 



these days it requires a strong will to re- 
sist the temptation to make some of the 
money for himself which he hears of oth- 
ers making so easily. it is character- 
istic of men to speak about their profits, 
but you seldom hear of their losses on 
the Stock Exchange. During the past 
two years, however, there has been such 
an enormous rise in the prices of certain 
stocks that some men became rich be- 
yond all their expectations, and many a 
merchant and trader who had worked 
hard all his life became duinfounded at 
i lie apparent ease with which his fellow- 
citizens accumulated fortunes, besides 
which the results of his own years <>f 
labor and diligence paled into insignifi- 
cance. 

Now. gentlemen, it is only fair to say 
that I think Montreal has suffered less in 
this respect than probably any other city 
in the Dominion, and I attribute this in 
a large measured to the conservative at- 
titude of our local stock brokers. I know 
a case in a western city where a broker 
carried $25,000 worth of a non-dividend 
paving stock for a man whose salary was 
less than §2,000 a year on a margin of 
si. 1 100. 

This is but one illustration of many 
similar cases which exist, which are bound 
to lead to the financial ruin of many 
young men, if the period of. depression in 
stocks is further prolonged. If I do not 
wish to be misunderstood in this matter. 
Trading in stocks is just as legitimate as 
trading in dry goods or boots or shoes. 
The wholesale merchant buys goods in (he 
expectation of selling them live or six 
months later and then takes promisory 
notes which he expects to be paid three 
or four months after that. He cannot 
tell whether he will get paid or not and 
buys his goods wholly on his judgment 
of the future and with the expectation of 
selling out at a profit. But he has the 
advantage of years of experience ; he 
knows his clients, as well as his market, 
and makes due allowance for emergencies. 
All that is part of his experience ; it is 
his business, and he is expected to know 
and understand it. But when he buys 
stocks and shares, what does he know 
about them ? Does he know the cost of 
the company's raw material, its expenses. 
management ? Very seldom. Good invest- 
ments are to be had from time to time 
and it is not amiss for a merchant to put 
some of his surplus funds into them. But 
he should be sure he has the surplus. The 
voting man who waits till his business is 
in that position will have sufficient ex- 
perience to guide him in case he wishes 
to put some spare cash into the stock 
market. It is to the young traveller, the 
voung clerk and the embryo merchant. 
particularly, I direct these remarks. 

Much of the success of the banquet was 
due to the following gentlemen, who com 
posed the banquet committee : 

Messrs. James Robinson, chairman ; S. 
A. Agnew, W. I'. Beauchamp, Fred Birks, 
I-'. S. Cote, .lames ('roil. T,. 0. Demers, 
• I. S. V Dougall. !•:. F. Doiitre. J. F. L. 
Dubreuil, -I. T. Dwyer, W. H. Evans, A. 
D. Gall. F. \. I). De Grandpre, D. M. Le- 
Febvre, G. A. Mann, C. M. Mills, P. .1. 
Paradis, John Paterson, Charles Roberts, 
Gus Tasse. R. C. Wilkins. and H. W. 
Wadsworth, secretary. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a woru 
eui-h insertion; cash in ails '.rs, OsrarM, 

ami abbreviations each count as one word In otimat- 
itiK cost. 



FOU SALE. 



Till ONL\ H V.RDWARE STORE INCLITD 
: plumbing and tin shop and tool* in largest 
■melting town In B < Population about 2,000. 

ill about $40,000.00 per month M A 
Trail, in 



HARDWARE— GOOD PAYING BUSINESS, 
1 lent location, sales mostly cash, stock 
$4,000, all first-class. Owner going into manu- 
facturing. Will sell quick at price on dollar. 
Address care London Fence Machine Co., London, 
Canada. (tf) 



A 1 OPENING. BEST AND MOST SUCCESS- 
ful hardware business in first-class Western 
Ontario town, 2,500 population. Agricultural dis- 
trict equal to any in Canada. Good live stock, 
value over $4,000. Proprietor going into manu- 
facturing. Splendid opportunity, must sell quick. 
Address "Hardware," care London Fence Machine 
Company, London, Ontario. (tf) 



THE LONDON SCALE WORKS 

hi ok'ni M. FOX 
(Successor to John Fox.) 

Manufacturer of Railroad, Hay and 
Platform Scales. 

91 York Street, LONDON, ONT. 



A 



iSi 




Strathy Wire Fence 

IS THE PERFECT WIRE FENCE. 

1 fndei pn 1 I [Inge M 

10 place when pmn 
coiled wire, or Hand-mads with plain wire 

WRITE POS QUOTATIONS Agent* Wanted 

Strathy Wire Fence Co., - Owen Sound. 



♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»■»■♦■»»♦•♦+♦"»♦•♦♦■♦♦♦+■♦♦♦♦■♦♦■♦♦■♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■»♦♦♦♦ 

{ STEVENS-MAYNARD J R RIFLE : 



i 

a. nine 

T If you want 



The 

Young Gontloman « 
Rifle 




Tho T 

Young Gentleman'* 4 
Rlflo. 

ns-Maynard Jr. It T 



the best cheap rifle ever made we have it in the Steve 
will be a great teller this year. Better place order now 

The leading Jobbers handle Stevens products. 
♦ ♦ 

t J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2l7 Bo " Chicopee Falls, Mass , U.S.A. ♦ 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. N N f w A &^f. A °° Ch ' mbe " 5t 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



^H^ %ff ft ^^ fV^NH»> i»i ■W * * **^/** 



Ask 

and 

Receive. 

Advertise 
and 
mire. 



If you want to sell 
a business or a de- 
livery wagon, if you 
want a partner or a 

clerk — advertise. 

If you have what 
you don't want, or 
haven't whatyou do 
want — advertise. 

Our condensed 
m . advertisements 

MCC|Uire. cost little, but are 

worth a good deal. 
You can reach most of the hardware 
merchants in Canada at the expense of 
a few cents. Our rate is 2c. per word 
each insertion, and remittance 
must accompany order in every case 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

MONTREAL end TORONTO 



Wc take this opportunity 

to extend to our many 
friends our sincere thanks 
for their kind patronage 
during the past year. 



May this New Year bring 
you all Happiness and 
Prosperity. 

THE 

DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO, 



LIMITED, 



MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




INDIA-RUBBER VARNISHES 

I\!M\ i;i BBEfi varnishes can be made 
from tin' following recipes, according 
ik an exchange 

\ Soak the best raw rubber for several 
days m a weight of the fatty acids from 
linseed oil half a~ great again as its own. 
Then hew with boiled linseed oil until 
solution i~ complete. The weight of the 
boiled oil taken is double that of the 
fatty acide 

B. A combined solution of copal and 
raw rubber in the usual solvents is heat 
ed with sulphur. It is .said that this 
varnish will stand a temperature of l' 111 
F. without becoming sticky and 
without cracking. 

i \ varnish which is recommended for 
woodwork to be exposed to damp is made 
by dissolving raw rubber in bi-sulphide 
of carbon previously saturated with sul- 
phur. 

D. Fuse together raw rubber and colo- 
phony at the lowest possible temperature, 
and then add a solution of colophony in 
benzole until the desired consistency is 
attained. All the ingredients must be 
perfectly free from water, and the pro- 
cess of drying them before compounding 
the varnish is rather difficult and trouble- 
some. It is said that dry coats of this 
varnish resist acid extremely well. 

E. A -mixture is made by heating to- 
gether petroleum residues, raw india-rub- 
ber, and coal-tar. Sulphur can also be 
added. The proportions vary largely 
with tie' consistency of the ingredients. 
The varnish can be thinned with any suit- 
able ordinary vehicle. 

EXPLOSION OF PETROLEUM. 

"There are three factors necessary to 
■ aii-'- an explosion of petroleum," says 
Professor O'Neill, of the University of 
California. " There must be a certain 
amount of oil gas or vapor, air and 
a temperature sufficient for ignition of 
the mixture. The proportion of air and 
vapors necessary to make an explosion 
varj according to the composition of tie- 
oil. Any departure from this mixture 
will diminish the liability and violence of 
the explosion. The temperature of igni- 
tion is usually high. 

" It i- a mistake to say that an explos- 
ion can lie caused only by light oils : 
heavy oils when heated maw and fre- 
quently do, give off considerable vapor 
and it is possible that a heavy oil at a 
Iiil'Ii temperature 1- a^ dangerous as a 
light oil at a moderate heat Before 
ino an arbitrary standard for fuel 



oils based only on the Hash test, a care- 
ful survey of the whole question should 
be made. Many other factors besides 
gravity and the Mash point determine the 
safety of an oil." 

PIL KINGTON'S VANCOUVER BRANCH 

Pilkington Bros, have opened a ware- 
house at the corner of Powell street and 
Columbia avenue, Vancouver, and will 
carry a large stock there. It is believed 
that this firm intend to make Vancouver 
their distributing headquarters on the 
Pacific Coast, and such being the case, an 
exceedingly large and varied stock of 
plate-glass will be carried. A. G. Tyne 
is the Vancouver representative of the 
firm, and in the past has done principally 
an order business for the Pilkingtons. It 
is due to his increasing sales that a local 
stock is to be carried. 

THE PRICE OF PETROLEUM. 

While there is no advance this week in 
the price of petroleum the market contin 
ins to stiffen. The many new uses to 
which crude oil is being put are rapidly in- 
creasing the consumption, which is es- 
timated by The Paint, Oil and Drug Re- 
porter to be over a million barrels a 
month in excess of the production. This 
demand is being- supplied from the reser- 
ves held by the large companies, the bulk 
of it being in the possession of The 
Standard Oil Company. As that com- 
pany controls the market they are now in 
a position to push up prices, and are do- 
ing it as fast as the market will stand, 
while other companies are closely follow- 
ing their load. The indications point to 
a continuance of present prices, with the 
possibility of futher advances. 

PAINT AND OIL NOTES. 

Lafontaine & Bastien, painters, Mont- 
treal. have dissolved. 

The Winnipeg Oil Co., Limited, are ap- 
plying for incorporation. 

Sydney. Australia, .City Council, are 
experimenting with residual oil for duet 
Laying purposes on the city street 

Ralph K. Thornloe, paint rlealar, etc., 
of Montreal, has assigned md his c'ciiit- 
-. ill hold a meeting next Monday. 

M' I .i-l. ill. Dougall & Co., manufactur- 
ers of varnishes, Montreal, have dissol- 
ved I). A. McCaskill has retired, and 
the business will be continued bv James 
S. V Dougall and Gustaf Gylling undei 
the old style. 



THE ZANZIBAR PAINT CO. 

The liquidation of The Zanzibar Paint 
Companj and the sale of the plant and 
premises of the company for $2,410 to 
The Canada Paint Company has aroused 
considerable comment. In fact, it is like 
ly that proceedings will be taken against 
some of the shareholders and directors 
in connection with certain stuck held by 
them. 

The Zanzibar Company was organized 
about a year ago with a capital stock 
of $100,000. At the time $80,000 stock 

was allotted to Mr. Richardson. the 
Cleveland promoter of the company, in 
return for formulae and manufacturing 
rights. Part of this hi- shared with 
other members of the company, who now 
claim that this stock is "paid-up," on 
account of formulae and rights given for 
it. This claim is disputed by some of 
the creditors. The liabilities of the <<>m 
pany are nearly $15,000, the principal 
creditors being the Bank of Hamilton, 
§6,650; The United States Smelting and 
Refining Company, 31,:><h>; The Walker Oil 
Company, $1,435. The bank's claims are 
covered by securities, but for the remain- 
der of the creditors, whose claims are 
about $8,000, there seems to be nothing 
but the proceeds of the sale above noted. 
Now, the consideration is, will steps be 
taken against any of the stockholders of 
the company ? 

MONTREAL TRAVELLERS. 

The travellers for nearly all the paint 
and oil houses in Montreal have been oft 
tin- road since before Christmas and will 
not go out again till the first of next 
week. They are all looking forward to a 

large spring trade and expect to start 
right in next week with good orders. 



PAINTS 



We until u lac lire 

these brands : — 

LION." "PEERLESS." "OWL," 

"RAVEN," alsu Ready-mixed 

Hom|e and Floor 

Palms, Hoof, Barn, 

Bridge and Brick 

Pain is. Coach Colors, 

Var. ishes, Jnpaus, 

etc Our prices will 

interest you. Write 

ua. 

The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont. 







CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






TKere is Money For You 
in "ArK Brand " Faints. 

" Ark Brand " Paint will not only pay you a fjood profit 
but it pays your customer a profit as well. 

It will wear better for him than any paint he can buy, for 
it is specially made to stand severe strains of weather. 

It will not blister in the sun. 

It is the satisfactory paint to sell, for there are no 
" come-backs " except for more. 

You can recommend "Ark Brand "with no fear of its 
failing to meet your guarantee. 

That's worth something, is'nt it ? 
Let us tell you more about this line. 



Francis-Frost C°,, Liroiled , 

TORONTO. 




1903 



For 

Happiness, Prosperity, 

Business 

and good health 

to all 



1903 



A RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



PAINT 
MAKERS 



What is the Reason 

that those dealers who 
bought a trial order of 

Hollywood Paint 

last year have placed large orders 
for 1903, and in many cases will 
carry Hollywood Paint exclusively? 



BECAUSE 



When quality coants, Hollywood ranks highest. 

HOLLYWOOD PAINT CO., i*u 



HAMILTON, CAIN. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PAINT AND OIL MARKETS. 

\ ro. 

1) RICES are unchanged throughout. 
Trade i> dull, all the travellers 
being «. « i V the road. We quote as 
follow 

WHITE [jEAD.— Ex-Toronto, pure white 

lead. §."> to $5.25; No. 1, $4.62} to 

No. 2, $4.25 to §4.50 ; No. 3, 

| to $4.12*.; No. 4, S3.50 to |3.75 

in |>a i 25-Ib. and upwards ; £e. 

per lb. extra will be charged for 124-lb. 

mine dry white lead in casks, 

RED LEAD— Genuine, in casks of 560 
-150 to §4.75; ditto, in kegs of 100 
. No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., S3.7"> 
.into, kegs of 100 lb., §4.25. 
LITHARGE.— Genuine, 6 to 64c 
WHITE ZINC— lie. i. line, French V.M., 
m casks. §6.25; Lehigh, in casks, §6 to 
S6.25. 

SHINGLE STAIN— In 5-gallon lota, 
60 to 75c. per gallon. 
PARIS WHITE— 00c. to SI per 100 lb. 
WHITING.— 65c per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c 

GUM SHELLAC— In cases, 35c; in 
less than cases, 40c per lb. 

LiyUlU SHELLAC— Pure orange, in 
bbls., §2.25 to §2.35 ; white, §2.35 to 
§2.15 per gal. ; in less quantities, 10c 
extra. 

GLUES.— Broken sheet, in 200-lb. bbls., 
84c per lb.; cabinet glue, in bbls., 12c; 
emery glue, in bbls., 174c; bookbinders', 
ground, lOAc.; finest American, white. 
19c; No. 1 American white, 15c per lb. 
1'LTT V— Bladders, in barrels, §2.25; 
bladde.s, in 100-ib. kegs, §2.40 ; bulk in 
bbls., if 1. 00 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up 
to 100 lb., §2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, 
less than 100 lb., §2.90. 

PARIS GREEN.— Petroleum bbls., I4e. 
per lb.; arsenic kegs, 14jc; 50 and 100- 
tb. drums, 15c; 25-tb. drums, lo-£c; 1-tb. 
packa^' s, 16c; J-Ib. packages, l^c; l-lb. 
tins, )6c; 4-lb. 18c 
PLASTER PARIS— New Brunswick, 

r barrel. 
PUMICE STONE. -Powdered, fcJ.50 per 
cwt. in bbls. and 4 to 5c per tb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c in small lots and 
8c in bbls. 

LIQUID PAINTS— Pure, §1.20 to &1.4U 

per gallon ; No. 1, §1 10 per gallon. 

BARN PAINTS.— 65 to 70c per gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— English, in cases, 9 

to 94c per lb. and 10 to 104c for single 

tins. 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, I to 2 bbls., 65c; 
boiled, 68c.; '■' to 5 barrels, raw, 64c ; 
boiled, <;7< ; 6 to 9 barrela, raw, 62c ; 
boiled, 65c. delivered. To Toronto, Ham 
ilton and London, 2c less. All quanti 
ties of 10 bbls. and over of linseed oil 
sold only f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don and Guelph. 

J I Kl'ENTINE. -Single bbls., 77c; 2 to 
3 bbls., 76c. delivered. Toronto, Hamil 



ton and I. on. Ion, lc less. For less quanti- 
ties than barrels, 5c. per gallop extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages, 
50c and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will ha 
charged. 

GASOLINE AND BENZINE.-We quote: 
Benzine, PJJc and gasoline, ordinary, 
21J-C and engine, 22£c f.o.b. Toronto. 

MONTREA1 

The holiday season keeps the markets 
quiet as far as the general trade is 
concerned, bul there is still quite a de- 
mand for lines used bj manufacturers 
working indoors. Paris green continues in 
good demand with no change in prices. 
Linseed oil and turpentine is unchanged 
looally, but in the primary markets the 
former is still very inactive, and the lat- 
ter strong with a rising tendency. Prices 
are as follows : 

GROUND WHITE LEAD.-Best brands, 
Government etandard, $4.90 to §5.15; 
No. I, 14.674 to J4.T7-J ; No. 2, §1.30 to 
84.40; No. 3, $3.92* to §4.024; No. 4, 
$3.55 to 83.65 all f.o.b., Montreal. Terms, 
1 months, or 3 per cent, off for cash in 
30 days. 

DRY WHITE LEAD.-S5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, §5.50. 

DRY WHITE ZINC-Pure dry, in 
casks, 6£c; in 100-lb. kegs, 6fc No. 1 
zinc, in casks, 5£c; in 100-tb. kegs, 5|c. 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25-lb. irons, 8c; No. 1, 7c; No.2, 6c 

PUTTY.—' We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
§1.90 per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 
§2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., §2.25 ; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200-lb. kegs or boxes, 
§2.40 ; in tins, §2.55 to §2.65 ; in less 
than 100-lb. lots, §3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c higher, 
f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL.— Casks, 7c; 100 
tb. kegs, 74c; smaller quantities, 8Jc 



RED LEAD.— Genuine red lead, in casks, 
§4.50 ; in 100-lb. kegs, §4.75 ; in less 
quantities, §5.75 per 100 tb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities, §5.50. 

LITHARGE.— Ground,' casks, 5c ; less 
quantities, 54c; flake litharge, casks, 
§5.25 ; smalls, $5.75 per 100 lb. 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, 60 to 63c in 1 to 
I bbls.; 59 to 62c in 5 to 9 bbls. Terms, 
im 1 cash in 30 days. Delivered in Onl 
alio, between Montreal and Oshawa, at 
2c per gallon advance. 

TURPENTINE.— Single barrels, 75c; 2 
to 4 barrels. 74c Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 

SHELLAC VARNISH.-Pure white, 
§2.35 to §2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS.-$1.20 to §1.45 per 
gallon. 

CASTOR OIL— 8J to 9£c in wholesale 
lots, and 4c additional foi small lots. 

SEAL OIL.— 48 to 50c 

COD OIL— 35 to 374c 

PARIS GREEN.-Petroleum barrels, 
13£c per lb.; arsenic kegs, 134c; 50 and 
100-lb. drums, 14c; 25-tb. drums, 144c. ; 
l-lb. packages, 15c; -4-tb. packages, 17c; 
l-lb. tins, 16c; 4-tb. tins, 18c 

WINDOW GLASS. 

TORONTO. 

Prices keep steady, but there is noth- 
ing doing, and our quotations are still 
as follows : Under 26 inch, §4.25 ; 26 
to 40 in., §4.65 ; 41 to 50 in., §5.10 ; 51 
to 60 in., §5.35; 61 to 70 in., §5.75; 71 
to 80 in., §6.25 ; 81 to 85 in., §7 ; 86 to 
90 in., §7.75. Toronto, Hamilton and 
London. Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 
30 days. Discount, 15 per cent. 

MONTREAL. 

Prices keep steady, but there is very lit- 
tle. business doing. Prices are unchanged. 
We quote: First break. 50 ft.. $2; second, 
<■_' 10 for 50 feet; first break, 100 feet, 
"1.30; second break, $4 ; third break, 
§4.50; fourth break, §4.75. 



BEGIN THE NEW YEAR 

by stocking the best liquid paint on the market. 

"ANCHOR" LIQUID PAINT has no equal. The 

White Lead used in its manufacture is BRANDRAM'S B. B. GENUINE 
— the world's standard . . . 

— It gives satisfaction. 

— It's a seller. 

— Its advertising is up to date. 

— It's a money maker. 








Send us a post card and let us tell 
you all about it. 



TRADE MARK 



HENDERSON & POTTS 

ESTABLISHED 1874. 

Halifax and Montreal. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




rthur. Corneille & Co. 



lu 



p 

MONTREAL 

and Gelatine 



In extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES ANO PRICES. 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF . . 



^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS A CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention HARDWARE and Mi i a l . when writing. 



INDELIBLO. 




Read about this and 

learn of the Famous 

Cold Water Paint. 



Indeliblo la ;i drj powder. 
It cornea in ;i number <»f beau 
t itul colors ; 1 1 1< 1 a pure wow 
white. It « ) 1 1 1 \ requires to be 
mixed with cold water to 
produce a splendid paint. 
Indeliblo ia washable, Banitary, fireproof, wea 
ther-proof and durable for interior and exterior 
mi all kinds of buildings. 

The white is splendid for lighting up dark 
corners, shafts, alleyways, elevators and ever] 
thing requiring a pure white. There'a money in 
Indeliblo. Send for color card and particulars. 

A. RAMSAY & SON. ■ ' e " t8 • . MONTREAL 

THE J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO.. Limited. • WINNIPEG 
McLENNAN. McFEELY & CO.. • • ■ VANCOUVER 

Makers 
THE MURALO COMPANY, New Brighton, Borough of Richmond, New York 



TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE 
BEST is the DEALER'S DUTY. 

Duly to himself — duty to his customers. The "best" tells. This is doubly 
true of Brnshea, and more especially of Paint Brushes. To do good work 
a painter must have a good Brush. There's nothing in which high-grade 
quality and careful workmanship tell more than in a Paint Brash. 



BOECKH'S 



Flexible Bridled 
Brushes 



are in greater demand than any other Paint Brashes, because they deserve 

tO be. 

_ _ _ . . . __ The bridle cbii easily be removed and replaced 
KH I A I I Vk r* Tbe bridle is not affected by water, oil. or paint 

^■" ■ *■' »—'■—' -pi,,, bridle works on ■ ptvoi and thus keepa the brinUee elastic. 

—If you have not received our handsome Illustrated iqoj 
—Catalogue, send us your name and address on post card. 







OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cana's Newmarket Factories. 



UNITED FACTORIES, 



MONTREAL BRANCH : I and 3 DeBrasoles St 



Head Office : TORONTO. 

LONDON BRANCH: 71 Dundas St 



LIMITED. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



AND ALLIED TRADES 



MARITIME HEATING CO., LIMITED. 

V\ Amherst, N.S., despatch says that 
the prospectus of a new concern has 
been issued in that town. The gentlemen 
nterested are J. Avard Black, William 
Knight, John A. Law-, |. Grossman, and 
C. A. Lusby, o\ the presenl Amhersl 
Foundry and Heating Co., and I). W. 
Robb, head oi the Robb Engineering Co. 

Tlii- object o\~ the new concern is to 
acquire from the Robb Engineering Co. 
the right to manufacture and -ell the well- 
known Robb Hot Water Heater, and 
from the Amher>t Foundry and Heating 
Co., the premises now occupied by them 
in Amherst, and such of the plant as they 
may require in their new business. 

J. Avard Black will take the active 
management, while J. A. Laws will be 
the mechanical superintendent. Botli 
these gentlemen are eminently qualified 
by practical experience for their respective 
positions. The authorized capital will be 
$100,000. Of this amount it is proposed 
to issue one half, the balance to be avail- 
able later. $25,000 will be required for 
the purchase of the properties mentioned 
above and $10,000 worth of new machin- 
ery will be added, leaving $15,000 for 
material and working. 

Mr. Black and his four associates in the 
Amhersl Foundry and Heating Co. and 
I). W. Robb have taken $15,000 of 
the amount and the balance, $35,000, will 
be offered lo the .public. 

FRED. G. BRENTON MARRIED. 

Fred. G. Brenton, the local manager ol 
the Gumey-Oxfbrd Stove Co., was mar- 
ried in the Dundas Street Methodist 
Church on Saturday morning to Miss May 
Deeley, of Ontario street, daughter of Mr. 
and Mr-. Fred. Deeley. Rev. C. T. Scott 
performed the ceremony in the presence of 
a company comprising only the relatives 
of tile parties. Mr. and Mrs. Brenton left 
on the 10.25 a.m. express for the Coast. 
London, Ont., Free Press. 

ELECTRIC COOK STOVES. 

Complete electric Cook stoves are being 
placed in several new apartment houses. 
Each division of the stove has a- separate 
heater, which may be used without the 
others simply by turning a small switch. 
A( the present price of electric current the 



cost of cooking by electricit) is a little 
more than by gas or coal, but when the 
new system comes into more general use 

the price is expected to be reduced. The 
time will come when farmers will light 
their house, yard and barns and do their 
cooking by electricity generated by wind- 
mills and stored in storage batteries. 
American Artisan. 

AN ELECTRIC WATER HEATER. 

In reply to an inquiry as to how to make 
a simple electric water healer suitable for 
heating a small glue pot, by rising the 
current that supplies the ordinary incan- 
descent light ; some sort of arrangement 
that could be set in the water if possible, 
the Scientific American says : '.' For an 
electric heater to be used in place of an 
ordinary incandescent lamp you should 
not take more than one ampere of current. 
German silver wire may be used, No. -24 
being a good size. If the current is of 
110 volts pressure, 330 feet will be re- 
quired. If it is 52 volts, about 150 feet 
will answer. This must be wound and 
insulated by asbestos, else the fire insur- 
ance is void. It should be inclosed in a 
metallic tube, in order to place it in the 
water to be heated. Twice the iength of 
iron wire may be used." 

AMONG THE TRADE. 

THE Chicago Journal fears that, not- 
withstanding the great increase in 
the use of plate mica sheets for 
stoves, chimneys and electrical supplies, 
and of scrap mica for boiler coverings, 
etc., the importation of mica from Canada 
and India is likely to curtail the produc- 
tion in the United States. 

Alex. Anderson, dealer in scrap iron, 
Montreal, is dead. 



The Mystic, One., Foundry Co., have 
registered to do business. 

The Mount Royal Foundry Co., Mont- 
real, has been incorporated. 

Alex. Payette & Co., tinsmiths, St. 
Johns, Que., have registered as a business 
concern. 

Thos. Griffin, foundryman, Guelph, 
(.Int., is enlarging his founday, making it 
to x 20 ft. 

Geo. F. Macdonald and C. M. Marpole 
have registered as coal dealers under the 
style of Macdonald, Marpole & Co., Van- 
couver. 

The Canadian Tinplate Decorating Co. 
are looking for inducements from Berlin 
or London, Ont., on condition that they 
establish a factory in either of those muni- 
cipalities. They offer to spend $13,000 on 
plant and to employ an average of 50 men 
at an average salary of $10 a week. J. 
W. Donovan and J. Thompson represent 
The Canadian Tinplate Decorating Co. 

AN UNUSUAL TINSM1THING JOB. 

Australian Hardware' tells of an unusual 
tinsmithing job recently performed by 
Mr. Foxcroft, of Greymouth, New 
Zealand. A number of Chinese, employed 
under contract, visited different cemeteries 
throughout the colony and disinterred the 
bodies of Celestials for removal to the 
land of their birth. Where the remains 
consisted of bones only they were wrapped 
in a cloth, after being washed and dried, 
and placed in a wooden coffin. But 
where any portion of the flesh remained, 
an inner air-tight zinc coffin was used, 
and it was for the making and sealing up 
of these that Mr. Foxcroft was employed. 
He was the only European in the party. 
Altogether 460 bodies were removed, a 
steamer having been specially chartered 
to convey them to China. 



MANTELS, GRATES and TILE. 

Are any of your customers building a new house ? If so, why not 
try and sell them a mantel as well as hardware ? They will want 
one, and it will pay you. Write us for catalogue and price. 

THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

"76 York St., TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






The Selling Qualities 

Or our splendid range 

]k Imperial Mm 

make them the most desirable stock you 
can handle. 

THEIR DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
FRONT DRAW-OUT ORATE 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

and other improved features, give them a quickly ap- 
preciated precedence over other ranges. 

Housewives everywhere praise them enthusiastically. 

Customers realize their superiority on sight — sales 
are easy. 

They're the popular range of Canada. 

Send us your address at once. 



THE GURNEY F 



CO,, Limited 



TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 




THE QURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



"NORTHERN" 




DRY COLD AIR PRINCIPLE. 



JUST A FEW 



Cold Facts 



IN FAVOR OF 



The " 



Northern" Refrigerator 



"It's a 

Seller" 



Raised panels. 

New style swing base 

Antique flow finish. 

Fancy brass locks and hinges. 

Hardwood ice rack. Extra large ice-box. 

Zinc- lined throughout. Galvanized Iron Shelves. 

Air space insulated with paper and wood. 

Look into It before placing orders— it will pay you. 
For dimensions and prices write 



TheThos. Davidson Mfg. Co., l » t " Montreal, P.Q. 



OS 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



■»^*»^^V*»wl 



Store and Store Front Arrangement. 



•-v*0 



*»A r WD S.", St. 
\ I for lnformatn 



John, N.B., ask 
ion and sugges- 
tion on arranging a stoic 
front. Store is 80 ft. deep and 25 ft. 
wide. They state in their letter that back 
of store is well lighted, but that centre 
of store ■> not light enough. The rough 
drawing conveys my idea of the best 
means of laying out this front. Accord- 
in^ to this plan you could get two nice 
windows. 9 ft. high, H'.\ ft. long at back 
and (5 ft. deep. The entrance could be 
made 7 ft. wide at .street level, receding 
to I ft. at door, which would make a nice 
entrance. The front glasses could be 1) 
ft. long and background of window would 
be H ft. longer. Along the top of the 
frontage, prism glasses could be laid in. 
These magnify the light and would flood 



should be placed — a continuation of mir- 
ror at back would be the proper thing. 
This end mirror heightens the effect of 
the trim and gives it immensity. The 
window floor should be 18 in. from street 
level. The firm's name in brass could 
run across the front of window, as indi- 
cated in drawing, and below this a panel- 
ling in oak. The door might have an 
oval-bevelled plate-glass instead of the 
everyday style. The flooring of vestibule 
should be in fancy tiling, with the name 
of the firm inlaid. in winter, storm- 
doors could be put on outside, flush with 
the front. These doors would be 3 ft. 
in. wide (each), one to push in and the 
other to push out. Over the door should 
be a transom in prism glass, to work on 
a pivot so as it could be opened for ven- 



2-S-" f^T. 



" Hardware and Metal" would be 
pleased to hear from them so that we 
might suggest the improvement to our 
inquirer. We trust our correspondent may 
find something in this plan that will suit 
his requirements. 



FIRE IN WHOLESALE HOUSE. 

Fire broke out in the basement of The 
Canada Hardware Co. 's warehouse, 10 
Debresoles street, Montreal, on Saturday 
evening, December 27, and did serious 
damage. By the efforts of the firemen 
the fire was confined to the basement, 
although the sample-room was damaged 
by smoke to some extent. 

The business of the company was inter- 



dVv^ Ttwvyj^ 




the interior with plenty of light. These 
should be 2 ft. wide. For Uc-ktrrounds for 
the windows I would prefer a mirror the 
full length of the back, divided into two 
Separate mirror-, one of which should 
slide so as to admit of entrance to and 
from tint window. These mirrors should 
be 6 ft. high, with an oak or walnut 
cornice at top. Above the mirror glass 
should run to the ceiling. The space 
above the mirror to ceiling, where the 
glass goes, would be .'! ft. in. in height. 
The light is thrown from the prisms, 
through the glass above the mirror into 
the store. The prism glass could be in 
sections, and one ection Bhould swing 
either on pivots or hinges so as it can be 
I for ventilation at any time. This 
could be run from a cord inside the store. 
At the wall end of windows a minor 



q.FT 



tilation. For lighting 1 would recom- 
mend the "Fink" method, which consists 
of a long trough shaped reflector with in- 
candescent lamps. The funnel-shaped' re- 
flector is all right provided there are en- 
ough of them. These reflectors should be 
attached to ceiling as near to the pane 
possible. The light is thrown by 
means of these directly on the goods be- 
low and is evenly distributed provided the 
reflectors are turned straight down to- 
wards the floor. According to this plan. 
I don't see why (if you adopt this idea), 
how you can get a more up-to-date front 
out of the space you have. This plan will 
give you two good-sized windows and an 
ample-sized entrance, and you would have 
the interior excellently lighted. If any of 
our readers can see anything that would 
be at. improvement oxer this description, 



rupted for only a short time, their Common 
street warehouse coming in very handily. 
At the time of writing arrangements with 
the insurance companies have not been 
completed. 

The loss is between $6,000 and $7,000. 
The insurance was $80,000, divided among 
the various companies. 



WITH THE SEASON'S COMPLIMENTS 

On Christmas eve, as the employes of 
The James Robertson Co., Limited, Mont- 
real, were leaving the works, each was 
presented with a Christmas present in the 
shape of a turkey. Everyone in the com- 
pany's employ, from the highest to the 
lowest, was thus reminded of his em- 
ployer's good will. This is an annual 
occurrence. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



1865-1903 



WE 

now enter upon our thirtv eighth \ < . 1 1 U 

manufacturers of hoi leshoe nails ; om Imsi 
ness i" ili ihed In the \ esu 1865. To 

our friends in the trade we 

WISH 

thai theii man) favors in the past shall con- 
tinue in be extended to us in 1903, and that 

we li ill mutually euiuv ■ larger and more 
profitable business than last year 

YOU 

may rely upon our best efforts to maintain 
the supremacy enjoyed by our "C" brand 
horse nails tor the past 37 years, and to 
merit the confidence and good-will of the 
merchant trade by our business methods. 



horse nail can be made at a low price or a 
high price. If you want low-priced nails 
we must use low-priced and, therefore, in- 
ferior material : if you want the best — or 
"C" quality — nails, we have to procure 
the best material in the world, and that 
always means the highest price. We would 



be 



HAPPY 



to know of any material for making horse 
nails which would combine the lowest price 
and the best quality. It doesn't exist. 
Any maker who offers horse nails at a 
lower price than ours either does so at a 
sacrifice of all profit, or by using lower- 
priced material Our works and facility 
are unequalled in ( anada 



NEW 



processes for making horse nails have only 
the claim of being low-priced : none have 
proved equal for quality to the old reliable 
"hot-forged'' process us a d by us. It 
thoroughly hammers the nail from a solid 
rod of Swedish charcoal steel. If you will. 
during the 



YEAR 



upon which we now enter, keep an assort- 
ment of "O" brand horse nails in vour 
stock, and ask the farriers to note carefully 
the results in their work, you and they will 
irprised at the result. Quality, like 
blood, tells Ask for them. 



Canada Horse Nail Co. 

nONTREAL 



TESTS OF NOVO STEEL. 

N| OVO steel, tot lathe and planet tools, 
is .1 steel of wonderful durabilitj foi 
turning old tin-, axles end pa< Ic- 
ing rings, anJ nol onlj do tools of this 
steel keep the cutting edge 1;, 1,, 20 times 
longer than tin- ixst self-hardening steel, 
hut you tan also increase the Bpeed on the 
latin- ami planers 3 and 1 times, and, in 
many instances, up to the lull limitofyoui 
mat nine. 

The following tests have been made in 
railwa) shops in the United States: At 
tin- I.. & N. simp- at Louisville, K\., the 
Novo -tool bored a Mid vale tire at m ft. 
per minute, ' s in. cut, ', in. feed, and 
finished a number of tires at that speed 
without requiring sharpening. At the 
Michigan Central shops, Jackson, it turned 
axles and finished them without grinding 
the tool, at !)."> ft., \, in. reduction, \ in. 
feed. fid Krupp tire- the Novo steel 
turns regularly 2"> ft. per minute, x / 2 in. 
cut, )'% in. feed, and every Novo tool will 
finish the tire without grinding. 

A lest on packing rings, at the E. Mil- 
waukee shops of the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railway Co. is 66 ft. per 
minute, ! 4 in. cut, 's in. feed, and the 
tool roughed the tire outside on the scale 
and finished the job without grinding. 

A large number of the railway companies 
of this continent have adopted the Novo 
steel in their shops, amongst whom are 
the following : Pennsylvania Railway, 
Altoona shops and all divisions ; Lehigh 
Valley Railway Co., all divisions; B. & O. ; 
L. & N.; Chicago & Northwestern ; Great 
Northern ; Chicago, Omaha & St. Paul ; 
Chicago, Milwaukee cv St. Paul ; Michi- 
gan Central ; Atlantic Coast Line ; Dun- 
kirk works and Paterson works of the 
American Locomotive Co. 

Novo steel can be annealed so that it 
machines as well as tool steel, and it can 
be made into twist drills, milling cutters, 
taps and reamers, which will do phenome- 
nal work. 

The following is a lest (if a twist drill 
made in one of the largest locomotive 
works in this country : A 1 1-:L\' in. Novo 
twist drill drilled at 188 revolutions per 
minute ami holes into verv hard steel 
castings of an average thickness of \ in. 
For comparison, a twist drill of a well- 
know n standard make was put on exactly 
the same castings, and the speed was re- 
duced to mi revolutions per minute, and 
this drill bored five holes, and the sixth 
hok it hopelessly burnt out. 

William Abbott is the Canadian agent. 



m. 27 190" 
RETURNED 



Joseph Shaw, general merchant ami im- 
plement dealer, Beausejour, Han., 1- 

cecded by Joseph Shaw .v. 



^ 3 



SEJwOft .903 






and reserve your orders for 

THE 

CANADA 



PAINT 



COMPANY 



We increased our number 
of customers largely this 
year, and expect to add to 
their number for 1903. 

Once you have 



CANADA 



PAINT 



COMPANY'S 



brands you will be content. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




r I A II K demand tot general ha 
week has m>t been Largt 



QUEBEC MARKETS 

Montreal, December 31, 1902. 

HARDWARE. 

lal'dw arc llu> 

■ge, but ilur 
the month of December two or 
three houses report having dour the larg- 
est business thej had ever experienced this 
There have been but few changes 
in prices. New lists are out on shovels, 
scoops, spades and "Star" traps, and 
these will be found in our quotations. 
Most of the travellers are in their respec 
tivo warehouses now getting ready for 
the new year's business, which ai\es in- 
dications of being excellent for spring. A 
number of changes are, as usual at this 
time of the year, taking place in many of 
tin' travelling stai 

SHQVf LS WD SPADES— The new list 
on shovels and spades is here given. The 
grades are known by the following names: 
First grade, " Jones'," or "F. >V \Y." ; 
second. "Burns'," or "Dunn's": third. 
"Gray's," or "Gold Medal " ; fourth, 
"Olds'." or "Beaver." The discount on 
both shovels and spades i> l."> per cent. 
off. In shovels, tie srrade remains a t 

§18.50 for square, and $19 for "D" handle 
round; No. 2, $16 for square, and $16.50 
for "11" handle round ; No. 3, square, 
$13.50, for "D" handle round. $14; No. 



1. both square and round. $11.50; culls. 
$9. This is a reduction on all grades 
under No. I of from $] to $3. In spade,-, 
No. I is also unchane'cd from SIS. 50; No. 

2, sic, ; \,,. ::. $13.50; No. I. $11.50; culls, 
$9. The same reduction in price as in 
shovels will be noticed in spades. 

SCOOPS.— The new list on half-polished 

socket SCOOpS is as follows. No. II. S I 2 ; 
V. -2. $16 : No. I. SIT ; No. 5, SIT. 50 ; 
No. (i. $18, all less 1"> pei- cent. 
STAR TRAPS. -A new list 
out on Star traps, as follows 
OUt .ham, No. II, S-2. 25; No. I. S-J,5ll; No 

■1. |3; No. 2!. si. .-,11; \,». 3, s|.:{2; No. 1 

$8. With chain. No. 0, S3.25; No. 
s:?. C,5 ; No. 2. si. 15; No. 2£, §5.75; No 
$8.50; No. 4, §9.50. The discount is 

per cent. olf. 

BARB WIRE. — Not much business has 
transpired this week. The price remains 
ai $2.90 per- Hiii-tb. keg, f.o.b., Montreal. 
and $2.55 f.o.b., Cleveland. 

GALVANIZED WISE.— The movement 

is still slow and no quotable changes have 
been made. We quote: Nos. (i, 7 and 8 
gauge, §3.20 ; No. 9, §2.55 ; No. 10. 
§3.30; No. 11, $3.40; No. 12, §2.70; No. 
13, §2.80; No. 14, §3.80; No. 15, §4.30; 
No. 16, §4.55 ; No. 17, §4.95 ; No. 18. 
§5.20. In carlots, f. o. b. Cleveland, the 
prices are : No. 9, §2.15 ; No. 12, $2.30 ; 
No. 13, §2.40, not dutiable. No. 10. 



is just 

With 



1, 
3, 
50 



§2.20; No. 11, $2.25; No. 14, §2.50; No. 
15. §2.95 ; No. 16, §3.05, dutiable. In less 
than carlots, 12^c. per 100 lb. extra is 
charged. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.- There has 
been but little done this week. Prices are 
unchanged, and our quotations are as 
follows : Bright and annealed, $2.50 
per 1(10 lb. f. o. b. Montreal. Toronto, 
Halifax, London, Hamilton and St. John. 
Net extras per 100 tb. are now as fol- 
lows : Coppered wire, 60c; tinned wire, 
$2 ; oiling, 10c; spring wire, §1.25 ; best 
steel wire, 75c; bright soft drawn, 15c; 
special hay-baling wire, 30c 

FINK WIRE.— No change has been made 
this week. The discount is 25 per cent., 
with net extras as follows : ] and 2 lb. 
hanks, 25c. per 100 ft.; ^-tt>. hanks, 37£e. 
and j lb. hanks, 50c. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.— There is 
not much demand as yet in these lines. 
The discount is (i2.V per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES.— Trade is still quiet. 
We quote: Galvanized. §3 per 100 lb. keg : 
bright, S2.80. 25 and 50-Tb. packages, 
25c. extra. 

WIRE NAILS.— The movement in wire 
nails this week is light. In carlots, the 
price is §2.40 and in smaller quantities, 
§2.45 per keg f.o.b., Montreal, London, 
Hamilton, Toronto, Brantford, Windsor, 
Out., and St. John. 



tt 



Samson" Milk Cans and Trimmings 

"Samson" Railroad or Delivery Cans and Trimmings. 
"Samson" Dairy Pail Bottoms. 





Saction of "Samson" Milk Can Bottom 



PATENTED, JULY 23, 1900 



the 



PATENTED, JULY 23, 1900 

The " Samson " is the strongest and ONLY ONE-PIECE bottom made. 

Has no place for dirt or sour milk to lodge — therefore the only sanitary bottom made. 

Every bottom in each size is of an exact diameter. Being stamped with a die there can be NO variation, as in a bottom made in several pieces. 

" Samson " Railroad or Delivery Cans and Trimmings are always furnished with Seamless Neck, and Seamless or Bell Cover, which, combined with 
' Samson " Bottom, makes this unquestionably the best Railroad or Delivery Can ever placed on the Canadian market. 
The " Samson " Dairy Pail Bottom is made the same as the " Samson " Milk Can Bottom, and therefore has all its good features. 

A complete stock of Tinned Sheet Iron in all gauges and sizes always kept on hand. 



IVIoOlary Manufacturing Co 



LONDON, 



TORONTO. 

< < B 



MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N B. 

very-thing -for the Tinshop." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



l\«.l IMI 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



FIRE 

BUILDING 

ENAMELLED BRICKS. 

SILICA 

MAGNESIA 



DRAIN 
CULVERT 



I PIPES. 



. F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



^v. 



SEWER PIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

^ CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, OUT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 



LIMITED 



Manufacturers ot 



DESERONTO, ONT. 

ifacturers ot 

Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery wh-re great strength 
is r< quired; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundr> 
Purposes. 



.. 



MIDLAND 



J5 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from e.irefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with i.'cnnellsville Coke as Fuel. "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Price to Sales Agents 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



<'M NAILS \ iVu ordi 
placed, hut the markel rulei quiet und 
steady, We quote In cai lot . |2 i 1 
keg . and in -mall lot . 92 La pei ki 

H0RS1 Wll - \ fair trade is being 
done. Hi ure quoted a foil 

1 brand, I". |fj and 7A pet 

cent, off; on M brand, "Oval 

eeiit.; "New I 'it;. . ',. 

Countei unk," do | ni Monarch," 

68 pat "ni ; "Peerle ." 50 and 7 1 
• ••■tit . 

BORSESHOI S \ mod. rate demand 
|H'\ ails for b< u Price ai e un 

changed. Oui qui are now tut 

follows - li - n i d medium, 

pattern, No. 2 and larger, 13.36; No. I 
and smaller, 13.60 . snow pattern, No. a 
and i '• 60 ; No. I ami smaller, 

S3 36 ; ft I. steel shoes, new light pat- 
tern, sizes I to 5, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.45; N,.. | and smaller, $3.70 ; leather- 
weight, all sizes, to 1, 85; toe weight, 
all sizes, l to I. 16.26. Shoes, more than 
one size in a keg, 10c. per keg extra. 
I' oh. Montreal only. 

Kl\ E fS \ND I'd RRS Not much ha. 
been dour in this line during the week. 
The discounts an' quoted a- follow-: Bee! 
iron rivets, section carriage, and wagon 
box, black rivets, tinned do., coopers' 
rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent. ; swedes iron burrs are quot- 
ed at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
with the usual proportion of burrs, 45 
per cent, off and coppered iron rivets and 
burrs, in 5-fb. carton boxes are quoted 
at GO and 10 per cent, off list. 

BOLTS. There i- little business pass 
bag in bolts or nuts. Discounts arc: Nor 
way carriage bolts, 55 per cent.; 
common, 50 per cent ; full square car- 
riage bolts, 55 per cent.; machine bolts. 
50 and 5 per cent.; coach screws, 66 2-3 
per cent. ; sleighshoe bolts, 65 and 5 
per cent.; blank bolts, 50 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 50 and 5 per cent. ; 
plough bolts, 50 and 5 per cent. To any 
retailer an extra discount of 10 per cent, 
is allowed. Tire bolts, 67^ per cent. ; 
etove bolts. 67$ per cent. Nuts, square, 
'■'i\c i er lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 3fc. 
per lb. off list. To all retailers an extra 
discount of $c. per lb. is allowed. 

S< REWS The demand for screws has 
not improved and the market remains 
quiet. We quote the discounts as follows: 
Round head bright, 82| and in per cent.; 
Hat head bright, S 7A and In per cent.; 
bias-., round heads, 75 and In per cent.; 

lira--. Hat head-. 80 and Hi per rent. 

i ORDAGE i h ■ bin little doing. 

We quote as follows: Manila, fie.; British 
manila. I2c; sisal, ll.'.e.; lathvarn. lie. 

BUILDING PAPER. N., further el 

ha- been made in the price of tarred felt. 
The demand is light, and our quotations 

arc as follows Tarred felt, $1.75 pel 

Inn In.; 2 ply. ready-roofing, B5c. per roll; 
3-ply, si. lu per roll; carpet felt. $2.25 per 
inn lb.: dry sheathing, 35c. per roll; tar 
sheathing, l-V. per roll; dry fibre 

per roll; tarred fibre, 60c. per roll; K 

and I \ |.. 65c. per roll; heavy straw and 

Bheathing, $30 per ton; slater-' fell 
per roll. 

-i ki en mm i i ni ii i • ; i i- dun. 

The price i- $1.40 per l 11 " square '■ 

PIREBRICKS The market -how- no 
improvement. We quote: English, $16 to 

$22 and Scotch, $17 i 1. 1 I'll i 

( I M I'M Trade tin- week has 
quiet. We quote: Canadian cement, $1.90 
2.25; German. $2.20 to $2.30; English, 
$2.16 70 to $1.'.'" 

bid . ex wharf, and American, - 
$2 2" .v ears. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

Ill VDUl \lf ill's | OR 

Tinplates — all grades 
Canada Plates, Terne Plates 
Black and Tin Taggers 
Steel Sheets for all purposes 
Imitation Russia Sheets 

Import orders for wholesale buyers only. 



509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



We wish all our friends 
A Happy and Prosperous 
New Year, and we are sure 
you will prosper if you sell 
the right kind of pump — 
The McDougall Standard. 



The R. McDougall Co., 

Limited 
SALT 



Pig Tin. 



"Boustead & Co'*" Penang 

"Straits" 

"Lamb and Flag" 

Copper zHSjr 
Galvanized Sheets. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u. M 

NEW GLASGOW. U.S. 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTI* 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SKATI > \ good movement in Bkateg 
>till prevails. V> changes in prices have 
been made, We quote i\> follows: Halifax 
pattern, •"'■•k-. per pair; nickel plated 
per pair; ladii i plated, 60c 

pair; ladi( ve nickel-plated, $1.35; 

plain hockey, 27c. to H.35; nickel-plated 
hockey, 60 (2.50; double-end hockey, 

fl.50 I ~ • -nap-. 35c. to - s l •'''•") 

lit u K\ A STICKS \ fair business has 

done. Our quotations arc still as 

follow-. Best Becond growth, goal keep- 

per <lo/. ; ash, 12 90; elm, 82.25; 

boys' elm, 11.10; common, 90c. Regula- 

tion pucks, 81.50 per doz. 

>\n\\ SHOVELS. A moderate demand 

; U. u, quote "Habitant," 82.25 to 

82.40; "Victor," -'50 per cent, off; steel 

railroad shovels, I s ami 5 per cent. off. 

FIRE >HO\ I I - Phere is an active 

movement. Quotations follow: NO ro, 

384 to Wc. per dozen; No. 55, 55 to 00c; 

37, B24. to 90c; No. 60, 82$ to 90c; 

No. 65, 81374, to SI. 45; No. 80, 50 to 

"Duplex," No. 7, 81.21; No. 9. 

SI.VJ; No. 11. 81.82. 

t OAL HODS. -Only a moderate demand 
i- experienced at present. We quote as 
follow-: Japanned, 16-in., 84.50 per do/.; 
17-in.. 84.80; L8 in., §5.10; with gold band, 
17-in., 85.10; 18-in., 85.40. Galvanized, 
16-in., 86.20; 17-in.. 86.50; L8-in., 86.80 per 
doz. The discount is 45 per cent. 

LANTEENS.— There is -till some move- 
ment in this line at unchanged prices. We 
quote: Tilt, lift or hinge, No. 0, 84 per 
dozen ; Cold Blast, £7 per dozen ; dash 
board, N<>. 0, 85.75 per dozen ; cold-blast 
dashboard, §9 per dozen. Extras are as 
follows : Japanning, 50c per dozen ; cop 
per-platinjj cold blast, S2 per dozen. The 
prices quoted are f.o.b. London, Harnil 
i 1 ton, Toronto, Belleville, Kingston and 
Montreal. 

METALS. 

Prices on the local market have remain 
t«d steady during the week. The demand 
during the holiday week kept up fairly 
well and the tunc of the market is firm in 
mo-i lines. Foreign pig iron is reported 
to be offering at reduced price-, but al 
thobgh the market here is rather quiel 
and the position of pig iron is not too 

strong, there has i a no decline in the 

price-. Structural material is in fairly 
good demand. Iron bars >how some 
thine ot a tendency upwards. 

BAB IRON. During the holiday week 
orders fell off a little, but there was still 
a good movement. We quote as follows: 
Merchant-' bar. 82; horseshoe iron. 82.25; 

i lion. $2.20. 

BLACK SHEETS. There is nothing 

new to report on this market. \ fair 
movement is reported. We quote as fol 
lows : 28 gauge, §2.65 ; 26 gauge, 82.60; 

2 24 gauge, 82.50; 8 to 20 ; 

82.50. 

GALA ANIZED ll«»\ There has been 
a little improvement on this market, and 
we quote: No. 28, Queen's Head, 84.40; 
Apollo. I", oz., 84.40; Fleur de Li 
84.15; Cmet, 84.10; •Bell" brand 84.05. 
less than case lotu 25c. extra is char- 
- 

SOIL PIPE AND I I'll INGS. Trade i- 
quiet. 'The discounts are as follow-: Light 
soil pipe, '■'• to G inch, 50 per cent., me- 
dium and extra heavy soil pipe, 2 to 6- 
inch, 00 per cent.; extra heavy soil pipe, 
h, 45 per cent.; light fittings, 2 to 6- 
inch, 50 and 10 per cent.; medium and 
extra heavy fittings, 2 to 6-inch. 60 per 
cent.; extra heavy fittings, 8-inch, 45 per 
cent. 



iT 



^ J 



CP 



And lake this opportunity of 
thanking them for their patronage 
during tht' past year. 






.o N 



<V 



-\- 



OUR AIM FOR 1903 : 

Excellency of Quality, 
Reasonable Prices, 
Prompt Shipment. 



Walter Grose, 

Selling Agent, 

MONTREAL. 



* 



*• 







THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Sorews, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



BABBIT with Canadian Metal 

"IMPERIAL GEISUIISE," " METALLIC/' 

" HERCULES/' " STAR." 

The best BABBITS on earth. 



THE CANADA METAL CO., 



TORONTO 



TRADE 




JXTobles Sf Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 



Manufacturers oi 



HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



SILVER PLATED WARE. Xr 

Silver-Plated, Hollow, and Flat Ware, Soda and Bar Spoons, etc. 

NEW DESIGNS AND LOW PRICES. 

A very wide range in Flat Ware — many beautiful pieces. 

IF YOU HAVEN'T OUR CATALOGUE", WRITE FOR IT. 

E.W. Gilmore & Bro., Ag M. s s Benedict"* Goods! Toronto 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






I'h; tftON, id.- market is quiet, but 
prices are maintained as ye1 at 
%'l I 50, ex ...I ■ . M..111 1 i-al 

[NGO'J i OPP1 i; Coppei i aaaj at 
812 50 to 813 50 pei 100 ft 

I Nt !OT I I \ there ie do i bange. The 
|.i ioe i- lead) at 127 50 to 828 50 pei 
L00 Hi. 

I'll r LEAD 1 1.. I.- baa been little doing 
during the week. I" carlots the price i 
82 90 and in small lots, 83 25 

LEAD PIPE. There ie a fair movemenl 
Compusitioii and quoted at Be 

and ordinary at 7c. The discount is 37-J 
per cent. 

I i;i i\ PJ PE I bere i an ad ii e mai 
kel at unchanged prices. We quote as fol 
low s : Standard pipe, per 100 
in lengths iiii.l.-i I'.i I'r.t Black, i, 
kti i" . . & 65 ; A, 82.85 ; ;, 83.65 . 1 in., 
>■"'-'". Ij. 17.35; 14, $8. 'Jo; 2-in., 812.55 
Galvanized, i, *3.2U ; J, 83.45; .',. ¥3.85.; 
,. >.". ; I -in., 87.20; l», flD.05 ; lj, 812. 
-H; 2-inch, 116.85. Extra heu\y pipe, 
plain ends, are quoted per 100 feet as 
follows: Black, A, 84.20; ,. 85.26; 1 in., 
87.55 .11. 810.65 ; I .;.. 112.76 ; 2 In., 81" 
GO. Galvanized, A, 86.20; ;, 86.65; I in.. 
19.55 j i|, 813.26; li, $16 ; 2 in., 821.1)0 
For threads and couplings 5 per cent, is 
added. 

TIN PI V I is Both local and foreign 

markets have been (airly Bteady Bere, 

there bus been no quotable change, and 

cokes ~.-ll at 84.25 and charcoals, s 1 7.". 

5 25 

STEEL. Priest show no change. Some 
buying is reported during the week, but 
the markel ruled quiet at the following 

pri.-c-.. Sleighsl 82. 10 ; tire, 82.20 . 

bar. 82 05; spriner, 82.85; reeled machinery. 
82.75; toecalk. 82.60; machinery (iron fin- 
ish), 82.10; mild steel, 82.05; iquare bar- 
row, 82. 15. 

TOOL STEEL. Business is verj quiet 
Quotations follows: Black Diamond, Sc; 
Sanderson's, s to 12c, according to the 
grade; Jessop's, 13c.; Leonard's, 7-Jc. ; 
Jonas iV Colver's. In to 20c; "Air Hanl- 
.-ninc." 65c. pei Hi. 

CANADA PLATES. There is no new 

feature to note this week. A good move- 
ment has kept up in galvanized plates 
We quote : 52s, 82.70 to 82.80 ; 60s, 
82.85 to 82.90; 75s, §2.80 to 82.85: full 
polished, 83.75 and galvanized, 84.25 to 
W35; galvanized, 60s, 84.45 to 84.65 
I l i:\l-: PLATES We i te 87 50 

C01J CHAIN I here is not much do 
rug this week We quote as follows ; 
6, IJAc; No. 5. I0ic; No. 4. 10c 
b.; i in.. 7.Jc. per It..; 5 16, 86 
5-16 exact. 86.26: |, 84.26: 7-16. 84.05; 
'.. S3 95: 9-16, 13.85; |, 83 50; Z. 

83.45: 1 inch. 83.45. In carload lots an 
allowance of 10c. is made. 

SHEET ZINC There is ver} little 
doing. We quote 85.85 to 16. 16 
\\ I I MOM Quiet at 10c. 

ZINC SPE1 l IK Orders for spelter 
have been very few during the week. We 
quoti 

SOLDER. Bar solder sells at 20c and 

wiie solder at 18c, with a fairly 
trade doing. 

SCRAP METAL.it. 

\.. further advance is reported in ma 
chiin r\ scrap prices, but the market M 
still linn, though not particularly active. 
We quote as Follows Beavj copper 

and wire. 9c. per Hi ; light roppei . J 

heavy red brass, lOo. . heavy yellow, - 

Meht brass, 5c; lead. 2 to 2Jc; /i> 

to 2Jc; iron. No. I wrought, 815 to $16- 



Ea&tlakc Shingles 

Stand Every Test. 






They have been proved reliable, W 

Prevent fire are lightning proof can't rust or leak ami give ^ 

perfect, durable satisfaction. »-|% 

In popular use all over the Dominion, wherevei particulai people w 

require a good roofing. \|/ 



Don't be without them in Itock, 



Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 

TORONTO. MONTREAL. WINNIPEG. 



9 

I 



No. 2, $7 per ton; machinery Bcrap, 816.50 
to s 1 7 : stove plate. 813; malleable and 
steel, 86; mixed country rags, 60 to 70c. 
per 100 Hi ; old rubbers, f>£ to tije. pel 
pound. 

HIDES. 

Beef hides are i ep< »i ted Ic. lower this 
weak The market during the holidaj 
season is naturally quiet. We quote as 

follows : NO. I hides. ~},r.; \o 2, I 

\o .'!. .V;.. ; calf skins, 8 to 10c, and 

lambskins, 65c. 

RAW FURS. 

Receipts of raw furs this week have 
been large, owing, in a measure, to tie- 
holiday season. Considering the charac- 
ter of the market this year, however, the 
business during the past week and this is 
(airly satisfactory. Pon skins are -till 
wanted, and the prices are liiui We now 
quote : 



MOVI Kl \l Mil I s. 

Bo i hidi lower. 

New li-t- have been issued on 
pades and scoops ; also on 
1 1 ap 



sho\ els. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 2, 1903 

HARDWARE. 

All the jobbers reported that the 
hardware trade was quiet at the 
turn of t he year. The t ra\ .11. i - 
are off the road preparing their samples 
tart work next week, and in the 
meantime the wholesale trade are busj 
taking stock and finishing up the busi 
n.-s- of the old year. The prices of tar 
red felt have advanced 5c. pei 100 lb. of 
-ply. and 3-ply ready-roofit ei roll 



I Uedi'm Small ! 

BEAVER Labrador and choice 1 86.00 16.00 83.75 H-LS0 

ry Rocky Mountains and Western 

Strictly Prime, or. No 1 8.00 4m LOO 

Partly Prime, ■ ■ 9 LOB S.00 100 

Uoprime, or. Ho. 3 3.(10 2.00 : . 10 

Plat, weak, or poor, .>r. No I 8.80 B0 

Lane Uedi'm Small -.' 

l-.i w: I-.: >cl Choia ■ -. IS.0 : 

Brown " I 

1 3 I 

B LDGEH Ol all •■ ti 06 

D i Pale | 

I [8 HER Eastern and fai si,. 

Terril I W item ■■ SO 

I 1 3 

POX Red North-Eaateni and sfanilar fine bright red ktnda I i«i 175 1.36 ;. 

Territory and Western LOO • 

Murk Kair I 
Cr..s, Valne princinally a« to beaat j, all 

I i and far Northern ■ ■ • 30.00 

Pacific! i 50 • • 15.00 

lim small 
LYNX ini i . ■ 

Territory and Western 100 2.00 

Brawn Pi 
MARTEN British Columbia. Northern 1 17". 

Territory and Western 180 MB 1 •' 1 m 

1 hi 
Ijiri;. Uedl in Small 2 Ijiry.- 

MINK Halifax, far North-Eastem and . I I '•< 

I. rriton and Wi item 1 - 

Spring Winter Kail - 
Ml 8KR \ I I .- • best largi 10 to 13 8 to 10 i 

Territorj and WesU rn 

3 

OTTEB i I rar North Eastern - - 

Territorj ... A V 

U '.' 3 

l: V N 

Black Value according lo dart 

SKUNK 

Dark llr..». i 
WOLVEBJN1 rdloi to dark 1 10 

i kSTOREI M .... „„i 











£ 










X Z 




»2£ 


38 












3 


4 




3.00 


SO 


i 88.00 

1 in 




t 




1 15 






1 in 






4 


















3 


4 




1 .i 




































3 


4 




1.00 








80 










2 Small 








■ 










4 




• 












4 


























.25 





3^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



each, anil carpet felt, ton. The 

nun i on b| ! shovels ii ; i - 

;.> 15 i'>r cent., instead of l" 
iiinl ."> per cent., a> heretofore. The 1<>i 
of Olds' _j,...,u have been reduced 
s'. per 'In/in. Gray's, 82 per dozen, and 
Burns', 81 per dozen. This depreciation 
uade solelj t>> meet foreign oompe 
tition. 

BARB WIRE The market for barb 

wire was dull this week and the prices 

unchauged. We quote the base price 

as follows: $2.67^ from Cleveland, and 

loss in carlots Prom stork. To 

ronto | 

GALVANIZED WIRE The holiday 

dullness pervaded the galvanized wire 

market tlii> week, and our quotations 

are -till as follow- : \o>. <i. 7 and 8, 

83.15 to 83.35 per 100 lb.; No. 9, 82.65 

\o. 10, 83.20 to 83 i"- Mo. II. 

So. 25 to 83.45; No. 12, 82.80 to 83: No. 

83.10; No. 1 1. 83.75 to S3.95; 

No i:,. 84.30; No if,, 84.55. Nos. 6 tot) 

from Cleveland are quoted at S"2 . - T ' 

in less than curlots. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. Trad,, in this 
line is quiet. We quote the base price 
a- follow-: 82.50 per LOO II'. Oiling, 
kk\: coppering', OUc. and tinning, §2 per 
1UU Hi extra. Shipping points, Toronto, 
Hamilton. London and Montreal, with 
freight* equalised on those points. 

FINE STEEL WIRE.— The jobbers re- 
port that there was no business transact- 
ed in this wire. The discount is 25 per 
cent. 

WIRE NAILS. -These are dull and un- 
changed. We quote: 82.45 per keg and 
For carlots. The shipping points 
are Toronto, Hamilton. London, Ganan 
oquc and Montreal. 

( I T NAILS.- There is little doing- in 
these. We quote 82.50 per keg. 

HORSE NAILS. -The volume of busi- 
ness i- Light and prices are unchanged. 
Discounts are a- follows: "C" brand, oval 
hi-ad. 10 and It) and 7 !, per cent.; on 
"M" brand, 50, In and .3 per cent.; on 
"Monarch," 65 per cent., and "Counter- 
sunk" head. Ii.") per cent.; "Peerless," 50 
and 7 1 per cent. 

HORSESHOES.- Business in this line 
i- slack, owing to the holiday season 
being on hand. Our quotations an 
follow-: Iron shoe-. No. - and larger, light 
medium and heavy, 83.45 ; snow shoes, 
§3.70 ; light steel shoes, §3.55 ; feather 
weight (all sizes), 84.95; iron shoes, No. 
1 and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all Bizes), 83.70; snow shoes, §4; light 
steel uhoi ; featherweight ( a.11 

si/is i. %4 35. 

SCREWS The holiday dullness per 
vades in this market. The manufacturers 
aii- -till busj with their orders and the 
jobbers are in some measure enabled, ow 
i 1 1 ^r to tin- demand falling off. to replenish 
their stocks. Our quotations are as 
follows : Flat head bright, 87^ and 10 
per cent, discount; round head bright, 
62^ and H) per cent.; flat head brass, 80 
and 10 per cent.; round head brass, 7." 
and 10 per cent.; round head bronze, 05 
ent. and flat head bronze, 70 per 
cent. 

l:l\ II - WD BURRS. These an- -till 
quiet. The wholesale dealers are busy 
taking -lock and the factories are try- 
ing to catch up in their deliveries P 

are a- follow-: lion rivets, 60 and Hi per 
cent, discount ; iron buns, 55 per cent. 
i-op|.er rivets, with usual proportion oi 
burrs. 15 per cent. ; copper burrs alon> , 
30 and 10 per cent 

BOLTS \NI) NUTS \ quiet tone dom 
inati- the market lot bolt- and nuts 



this week. Quotations arc as follows : 
Carriage bolts, common (91 list), 50 {■<■> 
cent ; carriage bolts, full square (82.40 

list). .">."> and In pet cent ; carriage bolts, 
Norway iron (K.'S.llll list), 56 and 10 per 
cent.; machine bolt-, all sizes, 50 and In 
per icnt.; coach screws, cone points, GO 
2-3 and 10 |K'r cent.; elevator shaft and 
whifHetree bolts, 50 per cent. 

SPADES Wl> 8 II OV Kb 8.— These are 
quiet. There have been a good many 
goods <>f British and American manufac- 
ture entering into competition with the 
domestic article and a considerable reduc- 
tion has been made in the juice of the 
Canadian goods. The discount is now 45 
pes cent., and the list price has been re- 
duced s:; per dozen for Olds' goods, 82 
for Gray's, and 81 for Burns'. 

ROPE.— Trade in rope has fallen oil' 
with the holidays. The prices are un- 
changed Our quotations are as fol- 
lows: Pure manila, 14c. ; British man- 
ila, 12c. ; sisal, 12c. ; lathyarn, single. 
lie. and double, II Ac.; sisal bed cord, 3- 
cord, 48 feet, (i5o.; 60 feet, 80c; 72 feet, 
05c. per doz. 

HARVEST TOOLS— The holiday dull- 
ness continues in the market for harvest 
tools. The discount is quoted at 60 and 

1 per cent. 

I.. WW MOWERS. These are inactive 
and unchanged in price this week. Prices 
are as follows : Woodyatt, 12-in. wheels, 
S7.50 ; Star, 12-inch wheels, §5.50 ; Daisy, 
12-inch wheels, §4.90; Philadelphia, 10 
inch wheels, §6 ; Ontario, 10-inch wheels, 
$12.75. The other prices are in propor- 
tion. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH.— There has been 
little business transacted this week in 
green wire cloth. The prices continue 
unchanged. We quote §1.40 per 100 square 
feet. 

EAVETROUGHING, ETC.-Trade in 
this line is now at a standstill. Prices 
follow: Kavetroughing, 10-in., per 100 ft., 
S3. 10; conductor pipe, 2-inch, per 100 ft.. 
83; 3-inch, §4; 4-inch, §5.25; 5-inch, §6.75 
and 6-inch, §9. 

CUTLERY.— There have been very few 
..ider- received this week for cutlery. The 
market is dull and prices are steady and 
unchanged. 

I'd ILD1NG PAPER.— The prices of tar- 
red felt have been advanced 5c. per 100 

11 >. of ready- roofing, 2 and 3-ply, 5c. per 
roll, and carpet felt, $5 per ton. Trade 
i- slack, Quotations are as follows: Dry 
sheathing, grey or straw, 35c. per roll ; 
tar sheathing, grey or straw, 45c. per 
roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll ; tarred fibre, 
60c. per roll. 

TINWARE AND ENAMELLED WARE. 
market is dull and unchanged. The 
holidays have caused the demand to fall 
oil greatly, and the manufacturers and 
jobbers are taking stock and preparing 
for another year's trade. . 

STOVES AND RANGES.— There is lit 
tie business being transacted in the whole 
sale market in stoves and ranges. The 
>D i- well over and jobbers now are 

taking a rest after a busy year's work. 

SCREEN DOORS. As is' to I jcpected 

trade in screen doors amounts to little 
or nothing. The turn of the year will 
likely bring in some new business. Our 
quotations follow: Screen doors, common, 
two or three panel, walnut stained, 3 in. 
style, 86.60; stained, yellow or green, 
86.80; in natural colors, oil finish, §8.15; 
1 in. stvle. 20c. per dozen extra. 

CEMENT. This market is now quiet. 
The manufacturers are now preparing for 
next seaso unpaign and are looking 

out to do a bJ - w hej, the propel 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pie- 

paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 

6d. and is. Canisters. 



WELLINGTON 



KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS ATMFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 



* K>U- -- ^ 




Largert Varie 



Toilet, Hand, Electric Power| 

ARE THE BEST. 

Higheat CJmhty O rooming and 
8heep-Sheving Machlnet. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

6IMD POK CATALOQUI TO 
AM.rl.u Skew** mf|t. l'«., Ruku, K.H..C8A 




NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door Closer 
They work silently and effectually, and never get 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings throughout Oreat Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN S SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods | 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT.I 



STANDARD. 

The cost of Axes 
per million feet of 
lumber taken out 
should be the best 
Standard. Under 
this Standard the 
Crown Jewel is 
the cheapest Axe 
in the market. 

Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W.L. Haldimand, Jr.. {Eastern Agent, Montreal. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






%mmmm*"^l 



'wr 




r*z7 J"* 



Iceland 

Freezer Sales each year 
Since the start 8 years ago 



■ 



'y'^""^* 



are represented by the size of 
these freezers. Dealers experi- 
enced a proportionate increase 
in their sales. This shows what 
eight years manufacturing of an 
article of excellent value accom- 
panied by eight years of good 
advertising will do. Introducing a 
competitive article is slow work, even 
if it is better than the others. But, as 
soon as people realized the value of the 
Peerless Iceland Freezer, the sales 
were limited only by our power to con- 
vince women, dealer and jobber that 
the freezer was right, the price was 
right and our business methods were right. 

We have thousands of favorable expres- 
sions from women. Dealers tell us that they 
have yet to hear the first complaint ; their 
freezer sales invariably increase, when they 
handle "Peerless Icelands." Dealers believe 
in the freezer and say that their wonderful results 



are 



<T. 






■^i'-"f'i,it 






vS 



due to our perfect and elab= 
orate system of advertising. 

Our magazine and ladies' paper advertising will be 
stronger than ever before. Prepare for the demand by hav- 
ing on hand a full line of Peerless Iceland Freezers. 

Your jobber sells them. 

DANA 6 CO., Cincinnati. 



New York Branch. 10 Warren St. 



San Francisco Branch, 105 Front 










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3sl|'* 


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36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



time con \ ugust and 

lulu i . over 815,000 barrels ol t ■ 
cement were imported into Canada Toe 
domestic production, in round i,_ 
was estimated :u 1,400,000 to 1 ,5oO,Uuo 
barrels, bringing the total consumption 

in Canada up to 1,200,1 to 1,300, 

barrels. There are, however, several new 
ries in Canada thai will be in op 
eration the coming season, the products 
ol which will be on the market next 
summer, and it looks ;i< it there would 
be a considerable surplus of cement on 
the Canadian market. Whether prices 
will immediately go lower or not it is 
difficult to foreshadow, as the manufai 
turers claim that they have got the cost 
of manufacture down to its lowest point. 
Our quotations are Canadian Portland, 
52.80 to §3.20; hydraulic, $1.35 per bar 
ivl. A I the works the prices are $2.50 to 
S"J 7il per barrel. 

METALS. 

It is not expected that there will be 
much business transacted in metuls until 
the holidays are over, although trade is 
not by any means at a standstill. I he 
local pig non market is strong and the 
Canadian furnaces are all sold out for a 
considerable period ahead. Some English 
and Scotch iron is being sold in the 
country. Tin outside continues active and 
linn. Quiet conditions prevail in the 
I idled States iron ami steel industry 
without any sign of weakness, thus sug- 
gesting a bright outlook tor the new 
y.-ar. 

I'll. [BON. The Canadian furnaces have 
practically sold their output for some 
time anead and pi ires are nominally 
maintained as quoted below. Some of .lie 
English and Scotch product is being <>lt- 
ered at figures varying from |21 to $23.50 
per ton. Some No. I English is being 
sold at 824, when it can lie had. Prices 
are as follows : s-J.' J . to S'_'5 for No. ] and 
$22.50 for No. -2 at the Canadian 
naces. No. 2 Summerlee is quoted at $25 
on track. Toronto. 

STEEL BOILEB PLATES.— These have 
Cat Ce and none have I' ■ M 'I I In iv 
for a considerable time. We quote $2 per 
Hi" lb. at Pittsburg. 

STEEL BAILS.— The quotations for 
steam railway rails are steady a. $Hfi per 
lo a at the mills, Sauit Ste. Ma; ' ■. Out. 

TOOL STEEL.— The prices .jc un-.i-.n- 
ged Our quotations are *s follows : 
" B C ' and "Black Diamond." hi to 
lie. Jessop's, Morton's ami Firth'.-, 
lie.; donas t V Colver's, 10 to 20c; ditto, 
"Aii Hardening," 70c. per ll>. ; I 

Leonard'-. 8c. to 9c; Park'.- "Silvei 

to I I. . ; Pai ial," 15 to 20c. 

Ml I.I) SI EEL. The demand at present 
is a little (pint, hut the prices a re lirmiy 
maintained. We quote $1.90 per inn j, 
at Pittsburg and $2.75 per J00 lh. on 
track. Toronto. 

_ SPRING SI EEL. There was reporti 
falling- off in trade at the end of the 
but the mills are so busy that this i- tiOl 
to them perceptible. We quote 13.50 per 
I'm lb. on track. Toronto. 
BOILER Tl I'd.- II,. e are unchai 
BAR IRON Trade in bar iron has 
fallen olf with the. holiday season. FJ>c 

tone of the market is firm. We quote base 
pine : $2 ".". Ext) a i Hi to lengl h while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c. per 100 hY. 
1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c.; under 1 ft., 
20c; over 20 ft. by special agreement, 
according to length and size. 

I'd. \< K SHEETS. These are ouiet and 

unchanged We qth ,..,.. $3. 15 f,.,- 

ami dead Hat. 82.50 for 26 



I W \H\ PLATES. Thee is a fair de- 
mand for thesi We quote as follow- . 
Ml dull. |2.90 to 83; half polished. sj s.-, 
• : I" and all bright, 83.75 to 83 88 
|. \l \ WIZKI) SHEETS The market 
continues unchanged, and quotations are : 
— Head. 84.50 loi 2b bailee; Arner- 
ican, 84.40 for 21 gauge; Bell brand, 
84.3U for _'s ^aiiLic; Cordon Crown, 84.50 
for 2s gauge. 

I IV This has been in good demand. 
We quote 829 to 830 per LOO lh. 

TINPLATES.— The tone oi this market 
'- quiet. We quote as follow-: Char 

coals. 84.75 to 85, and cokes, 84.25 to 
84.50 per box. 

i OPPEB. fngot copper has been quiet 
at unchanged prices. We quote as fol- 
low- : [ngol copper, 813 ; sheet copper, 
S22 to 823 per 100 ft. 

BBASS.— The demand is Light. The dis 
count is L5 per cent. 

LEAD.— A quiet tone dominates (his 
market! Prices are unchanged at si',.;,!! 
per 100 ft. for pig lead, and $3.75 for 
liar lead. 

[RON PIPE . — Business in iron | ipe has 
quieted down after the holidays. The 
price pei 100 feet is as follows: Black 
pipe 1 in.. 83; ! in., $2.30 to $2.40; J! in.. 
82.65; J in . 82.85; |-in., $3.05; 1-in., 
85.20; i;ii... 87.35; 1 .V in., $8.95; 2-in., 
SI 2.55; 2.', -in.. $20 to $21; 3-in., $21 to 
$25; 3.}-in.. 830 to 832; I in., 837.50 to 
$38. 

ZINC SPELTER. -This metal continues 
inactive. The price is 5 to 6c. per ft. 

ZINC SHEETS.— A fair amount of busi- 
ness has been transacted in this line. We 
quote the base price : Cask lots, $6 to 
86.25 and part casks, 86.25 to $6.50. 

SOLDER.- There has been a moderate 
demand for solder this season. 

ANTIMONY.— The demand has improved 
this week. The price is steady at $9 per 
ton. 

PETROLEUM. 

The Union Petroleum Company's prices 
are unchanged this week. Prices follow : 
Lily White, Canadian, ITAc. in bbls.; Sil- 
ver Light, American, 19£c. in bbls.; Crys- 
tal Spray, water white, American, 20^c. 
in bbls.; Pennoline, best American im- 
poited, 22c in bbls. In bulk, 2c. less. The 
Queen City Oil Company quote as fol- 
lows: Sarnia Prime White, 17^c; Sarnia 
Water White, 19c; Family Safety, 20c. in 
bbls. ; Piatt's Astral, 19£c. in bulk. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

Prices are steady and trade is good lor 
this time of the year. Prices are as fol- 
lows : Heavy copper and wire, 10c. per 
ft.; light copper, 8 to 8^c; heavy red 
brass. 9£c; heavy yellow brass, 8 to S^c; 
light brass, 5 to 5$c; lead, 2 to 2£c. ; 
scrap zinc, 3c; iron, No. 1 wrought, Shi 
per net ton; No. 2 wrought, $4.50; ma- 
chinery cast scrap, $15.50 to $16; stove 
plate, $10; malleable and steel, $6 to 
$6.50; old rubbers, 6£c. per ft. and coun- 
try mixed rag-s, 50c. per 100 ft. 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax, December 29, 1902. 

r I^ HE trade in hardware for the last 
week, except in the line of cutlery, 

fanes kitchen furnishings and other 
kitchen goods, has nol been extensive. In 

fact, since Christmas Day there has I n 

practically nothing doing 

* • • 

Stocks ale now pi.tt\ well approximat- 
ed and also lei Igei I ialani • an I I he con 

census of ..pinion based on these p 

the business of 1902 ahead of any year 



for tin la-t five or even more. In some 
line- the volume has been remarkably ex- 
Cessive, while a U line- ha\ e kept up well. 

* # # 

In Halifax, where everj dealer has some 

special line which has been held largely 
by that linn for innumerable years— it is 
hard to get a general estimate of busi- 
ness from any one linn. It is also hard 
to distinguish between the activity, 

wholesale and retail, since nearly every 
wholesaler is a retailer as well. 

• * * 

Nearly every linn, however, deals in gen- 
eral builders' hardware. The trade here 
was remarkably heavy and well sustained 
from month to month throughout the 
year. There were heavy building con- 
tracts in the city, and throughout the 
Maritime Provinces generally. The trade 
is still active and promises well for the 
coming year. Price conditions were good 
and fluctuations in no line so great as 
to materially affect trade. The only gen- 
eral complaint has been that it was, in 
some lines, difficult to get orders filled at 
lir-t hands promptly. 

• * * 

In the line of milling and mining ma- 
chinery there has also been great activ- 
ity. Old mines have been refitting large- 
ly with new machinery, new mines, both 
in gold, iron and coal, have opened up, 
and lumber and pulp mills have contrib- 
uted largely to the volume of trade. 
There is also a good indication that the 
trade in these lines will continue good 
during the coming- year. There has also 
been an average trade in cordage and 
lines for the fishing fleet, and for some 

new vessels. 

# * # 

Money conditions throughout the year 
have been above the aveiage. Opera- 
tions undertaken have had money be- 
hind them, and bills have been settled 
with remarkable promptitude as they fell 
due. There have been some failures 
throughout the year, but the aggregate 
losses were not excessive. One firm in the 
city — Crowell Bros. — had a serious loss by 
lire, but they at once secured temporary 
premises, and with the aid of other firms 
were able to fill their orders without 
much interruption. A great part of their 
stock, ruined by the water, had to be 
sacrificed at auction, but their business 
is now running as if nothing had hap- 
pened. 

# # # 

The export business for the week has 
not been large, only amounting to $99,- 
881 : To Great Britian, $48,316 ; United 
States, s (5,070; Newfoundland, $5,195. A 
large | art of the export to the United 
States was fish for export south. 

R. C. H. 



NAILS 

Right Prices 

QuicK Shipments 

Quality Guaranteed 

Also 

STAPLES 

Write, Telegraph orTelephone 

Page "Wire Fence Co. 

Limited 

WalRerville, Ontario 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL H7 



, 



Start the New Year Bright and Light. 

Install LUXFER PRISMS and make Business Easy. 
We manufacture and deal in all kinds of ■ 

GLASS FOR 
STORE FRONTS 

and INTERIORS 
Will make suggestions valuable to your customers. Discount to Trade. 

Luxfer Prism Co M Limited 

lOO fting Street West TORONTO. 











CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




HOW THE NORTHWEST IS GROWING 

THE pasl year has been a busj one for 
the building trades in the Northwest. 
In Fori William. Ont., over $1,600,- 
000 was spent in building operation-., the 
bulk of it being in extensions to the C. P. R. 
premises. In Calgary, Alberta, it is esti- 
mated thai over $500,000 was -pent in 
building operations, principal^ in business 
blocks, churches and residences. In 
Brandon, Man., nearly $290,000 was 
spent in this channel, the principal item 
being Alexander <!v. Law Bros.' mill and 
elevator. In Areola, Assa. , a town only 

two years old, nearly $90, worth o\ 

new bouses, stores and other buildings 
have been erected. This town now has 
over mi places of business and Too inhabit- 
ant-. In Portage la Prairie, Man., new 
business blocks, houses, a hospital, a 
skating rink and other improvements have 
entailed an expenditure of over $220,000. 
In and about Moosomin, Assa., nearly 
$100,000 was -pent in extensions and new 
buildings, and about the same, sum was 
spent in Lethbridge, Alberta. In Edmon- 
ton, Alberta, waterworks and sewerage 
systems have been pushed well forward, 
Si 40, iKiii having been voted for this pur- 
pose. Curling, hockey and skating rinks 
to eo-t $18,000 have been built; al-o a 
$30,000 school, a $25,000 hotel, and over 
200 houses, stores, etc. About $200,000 
i- estimated to have been spent in building 
operation- in Dauphin, Man. Many other 
smaller town- report the expenditure 
Of from Sin. to Slid, > for new build- 
ings and for improvements during the 
_\ear, and all o\ them are optimistic as to 
the pro-pect- for 1 1 >■ 13. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS 

TORON I ". 

Purdy, Manse!! \ Co. have the contract 
for remodelling the plumbing and ga-- 
fitting in the Reliance Loan Co. 's premises, 
King -treet east. 

The Bennetl & Wright Co., Limited, 
Toronto, have the contract for heating, 
ventilating and plumbing the Macdonald 
Institute. Ontario Agricultural College, 
Guelph, Ont., which is to haw the latesl 
improvement- in these lines, and will be a 
large job. 

John Ritchie Co., Toronto, have 
the contract for plumbing and gasfitting in 



-ix houses on Shaw street for the Acme 
Loan Co.; for plumbing and heating a 
residence in Rosedale for M. C. Ellis ; for 
heating a factory in Parkdale for Delany, 
Pettit & Co.; for plumbing and heating of 
Marlett & Armstrong'- tanner) at Oak- 
ville ; for plumbing and gasfitting in 
residences for A. B. Orde, Rosedale, and 
J. B. Andrews, Parkdale. 

BUILDING NOTES. 

A large hotel is to be built in Selkirk, 
Man. 

A $!>:>, (MMt hotel is to be erected at 
Hamiota, N'.W.T. 

Hotel Dieu, Chicoutimi, Que., is to be 
repaired and improved. 

A $25,000 company is being formed in 
Areola, Man., for a ion-barrel Hour mill. 

A .")00,000 bushel annex will be added 
to J. G. King & Co.'s elevator at Port 
Arthur, Ont. 

Machinery and lumber is on the ground 
for the erection of a new sugar refinery in 
Lethbridge, Alberta, to cost $50,000. 

Berlincjuet & Lemay, architects, Que- 
bec, have completed plans for a new 
residence for Mr. Dubuc, Chicoutimi. 

A skating rink, to cost $10,000, is to be 
erected at Portage la Prairie, Man., and a 
Y.M.C.A. building may be built in the 
same town. 

BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 

HAMILTON. 

Levy Pros., alterations to warehouse on 
King -tree! ; W. <.V W. Stewart, archi- 
tects ; Campbell Bros., builder-. 
TORONTO. 

Francis Phillips, pair semi-detached 

houses near Bloor -treet, on Manning 
avenue, to cost $2. 

John Bucksey, pair of dwellings on 
Waverley road, near Queen street, to 
COSt $1,100. 

Geo. Bell, a brick dwelling on Green- 
wood avenue, near Gerrard -treet, to cost 
$1,000. 

MON ["REAL. 

The following building permits were 
issued during the month of Dei ember : 

Simpson & Peel, 10 St. Philip street, 
two-storey carpenter shop, $3,000. 

Montreal Light, Heat and Power Co. , 
one-storey engine-room, Prince street, 
(00. 

A. Champayne, Huntley street, two- 
storey dwelling, Si," 



All. Mcrcurc, Duluth avenue, three- 
storey dwelling, $3,000. 

Henry Morgan <S, Co., three-storey fac- 
tory, Union avenue, $5,000. 

Wm. Hurlubise, Lalonde street, two- 
storey dwelling, $1,800. 

The Montreal Light, Heat and Power 
Co. are erecting a generating -tore on 
Queen street, $1,000. 

James Ro-s, McTavish street, two-storey 
dwelling, $1,500. 

A. Beck & Co., three-store\ factory, St.. 
Charles Borrome street, $2,000. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

THE Carman, Man., Electric Light and 
Power Co., Limited, are applying for 
incorporation. 

A. Rochon, plumber, Ottawa, has suf- 
fered loss by fire. 

La Campagnie Electrique de Lorette, 
Que., have been incorporated. 

The Rapid City, Man., Power, Light 
and Woollen Manufacturing Co. have been 
incorporated. 

R. H. Lear & Co., dealers in gas fixture-, 
etc. , Toronto, have assigned, and the estate 
will be wound up. 

The Amherst, X.S., Foundry and Heat- 
ing Co. is preparing to remove in the 
spring to their new premise- lately ac- 
quired bv them, and will seek incorpora- 
tion under the name of The Amherst 
Foundry Co., Limited. The personnel of 
this firm will remain the same a- under the 
old name. 

TORONTO PLUMBING BY-LAW. 

W. N. Braybon, secretary of the Toronto 
branch o\' the Journeymen's Union, has 
written to the Master Plumbers' Associa- 
tion asking, on behalf of his union, for a 
conference between committees represent- 
ing the Masters' Association and the 
Journeymen'^ Union, to consider the 
drafting of a new plumbing by-law, 
which matter was considered by a joint 
committee in 1900, but with no result-. 

The Master Plumbers' committee, 
appointed to meet the journeymen, is 
composed a- follows: James H. Wilson, 
Wm. Mansell, Frank Maxwell, Mr. 

Pickard, K. J. Allison, and Geo. Clapper- 
ton. The dale for the meeting of the 
joint committee has not vet been set. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






OFFICERS OF THE N W.C.T.A. 
FOR 1903 

At the annual meeting of the Commer- 
cial Travellers' Association, held in Win- 
nipeg on Dccembei 20, the Following 
officers wen elected for the ensuing year : 

lent— R, M. Mi Gowan (acclaini 
Vice President— F II Vgneu (acclamation). 
I rea urer— 1 ' Mai int) re | > tarnation i 

i. ii i - 1 I i i 

' . i Bryan i \\ I kewry, F. < . 
1 1 \\ I [utcbinson, I P Mclntyr I A 
i i ■ ■• k i i ampbell, |. McRobie 

The report of the directors and the 
treasurer show a most satisfactory year. 

The new publication to be known as 
The Commercial Traveller, which is about 
to be issued, received the endorsement oi' 
the Association. .\i this meeting ii w.i^ 
decided to call a mass meeting of all in- 
lerested in the providing of better trans- 
portation facilities and hotel accommoda- 
tion for travellers, 1 1 1 i — meeting to be held 
in the V.M.C.A. auditorium on Saturday, 
I )ecember -21 . 

At this meeting it was also decided to 
send out balloting papers for an expres- 
sion of opinion on the advisability of at 



once going ahead with a building on ilu- 
propert} recentl) acquired bj the Associa- 
tion on the cornei ol McDermotl avenue 
east and Roi ie si i eel . 

WITH ANOTHER FIRM. 

Mi. John W. Richardson, who foi some 
time has been acting as assistant to Mi 
St. Arnaud, manager of the ( anada 
Hardware Co., has lefl tlui companj in 
take .i position with CaverhiH, Learmonl 
S Co. In hi- ikw place Mi. Richardson 
will look after the catalogue work, as will 
• is keeping the travellers posted while on 



tin- road and "tin i dut'u II ■ > u 
and Mi.iai wishes him ts in 

Ins new position. 



A BIG CONTRACT 
Rhodes, Currj .\ Co., Limited, Ami 
\ S . have been ven busj during the p.i-i 
year, and, it •■ k 1 ""-' start goes foi any- 
thing, tlu \ are going to have jusl •>- mtu h 
or more to do in 1903. I hej are now 
completing an ordei foi the i anadian Pa- 
cifii Railwaj placed in the spring foi 1,100 
boxcars, and have just received an addi- 
tional contract for 100 refrigeratoi 
In first-class coai hesand 300 Hats. 



Sap Spouts and Sap Buckets. 



i_ 



^@ 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., 



We will have something to say 
to you next week about our lines 
of these goods. Think over 
your needs in the meantime . . . 

TORONTO. 



IRON, 



We are headquarters for all kinds of new and 
old metals, babbitt, solder, etc. 



WANTED 



METALS, 



It will pay you to ask for 
our prices before buying. 



We pay highest market price for scrap metals. 
Write us when having anything for sale. 



RUBBER. 



FRANKEL BROS., 



92 Wellington St., MONTREAL. 

I 1 6 - I 30 George St , TORONTO. 



Successful Heating 

Our efforts to warm Canadian buildings economically have been crowned 

with success. The introduction of our 




ii 



CONOMY" 



Hot Water Boiler and its ultimate pe r fec t ing have contributed largely to our 
fame as Heating Experts. 

The "ECONOMY" Hot Water Boiler is made along sensible line — con- 
structed absolutely without bolts or packing — easy to put together — means 
satisfaction to the tenant, because it works steadily and burns little fuel. 

Write for a new and attractive booklet on this system. 

J. F. Pease Furnace Co., Limited, 

Head Office, 189-103 Queen St. Kast, TORONTO. 



t 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOUNDED 25 YEARS AGO. 

(\\ Saturday evening, December 27, 
/ the firm of Emerson & Fisher, 
wholesale hardware merchants, St. 
John. N.B., entertained their employes al 
l dinner in White's restaurant. Theocca- 
sion was the 25th anniversarj of the found- 
ing of the firm. The large dining-hall 
was prettil) decorated, .mJ between 50 and 
t;n persons -~.it down to dinner. 

Something entirel) now and original 
was the menu card. It was designed to 
represent a kitchen range, while the menu 
was most appropriately concealed " in the 
oven." A scarf pin in the form of a tiny 
silver wishbone fastened the oven door, 
and upon tlii> being withdrawn the list of 
solids and delicacies came to view. The 
scarf pins wore retained as favors by the 
guests. 

When the menu had been properly dis- 
cussed, T. A. Graham, on behalf of the 
whole stall", presented the members of the 
firm with handsome bronze statues, ex- 
pressing at the same time the esteem in 
which they were held by the employes. 
Both Mr. Emerson and Mr. Fisher re- 
sponded briefly, and spoke of the pleasant 
connections existing between themselves 
and the men. Other speeches were made 
by the men, and during the evening instru- 
mental solos were rendered by F. W. Mc- 
Nichol and S. Sweeney. 

The firm of Fmerson & Fisher will, 
about the middle of January, entertain 
their Sackvillc employes of the Enterprise 
Foundry in a similar manner. 

The growth of the business of this firm 
during the last .quarter of a century has 
been continuous, and both members have 
been active in all movements for the ad- 
vancement of the welfare of St. John. 



SENATOR PRIMROSE DEAD. 

Senator Primrose, of Primrose Bros., 
one of the most progressive shipping, 
milling and manufacturing firms of Nova 
Scotia, died at his home in Pictou, X.S., 
last week, after only a few days' illness. 
Besides being energetic in business the 
deceased gentleman took a great interest 
in'educational matters, and was president 
for some time of the Pictou Academy 
Alumni Association. He was also for 
main years president of the Pictou 
V.M.C.A. He was also active ill con- 
servative political matters, and was raised 
to the Senate in 1892. 



possible. Care, however, must be exer- 
cised that stock is not run so low that 
trade will be sacrificed. Every dealer has 
the satisfaction of knowing that whatever 
stock he may carry of Boeckh's brushes 
and brooms and Cane's vvoodenvvare, it is 
aluavs worth its face value at stock- 
taking time. No writing off 25 per cent, 
for depreciation of stock, because no better 
goods can be procured anywhere. 



M PRICES OF BABBITT METAL. 

The Canada Metal Co., Toronto, are 
now making their quotations on babbitt 
metal as follows: " Imperial," genuine, 
me; "Metallic," 30c; "Hercules," 20c; 
" Star," I. V.; Xo. I, L2c; No. i, inc.; 
No. 3, tic. ; No. I, 5c. 



A NEW LIST ON SCYTHES. 

A new list has been published on scythes, 
which shows an advance of 50c. over last 
year's prices. The net prices are as fol- 
lows: Casl steel, $5.50; "Clippers," $6.50; 
concave, $7; "Climax," $7; "Excelsior," 
$7. an; single head, $6.75; double head, 
S7.l'."> ; casl steel cradle, $8.50 ; silver 
steel cradle, $9.50; lawn scythes, $5.50 ; 
bush scythes, $6.50. 



STOCK-TAKING SEASON. 

As the season for stock-taking ap- 
proaches the dealer naturally desires to 
turn as much of his stock into cash as 



PERSONAL MENTION 

Mr. Dingman, assistant buyer for 
Moore & Brown, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., 
we are glad to hear, is on the way toward 
recovery from his severe illness. 

Mr. Jos. R. Henderson, of Halifax, 
N.S., President of Henderson & Potts Co., 
Limited, Montreal, has returned from a 
trip to England. He was in Montreal on 
Monday last. 

Mr. E. McDougall, formerly with the 
James Smart Manufacturing' Co., Brock- 
ville, Ont., commenced the first of this 
month to represent the Canada Hardware 
Co. in Eastern Ontario. 

Mr. A. I). Leblanc, who has been in 
the sample-room of the Canada Hardware 
Co. for some time, will start out at an 
early date to represent the company 
through the lower parts. 

CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

GREENING WIRE Co's. CALENDAR. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited, 
Hamilton, are sending out their 1903 
calendar, which is worthy of a place in 
any office, where its large size will make 
it especially useful for reading from a 
distance, draw attention to their recent 
improvements as follows : 

"You will notice from the cut of our 
works the very large additions we have 
made to our buildings. This has enabled 



us to greatly extend our plant and 
machinery, and the improved facilities we 
now enjoy will enable us to till all orders 
promptly. We are now settled in our new 
and commodious offices, and hope with 
the additions we have made lo our staff 
and the increased facilities afforded, lo 
give satisfactory and prompt attention to 
all business we are favored with." 



RULES FOR CONDUCTING BUSINESS. 

We have published every now and then 
rules for conducting- business. New ideas 
are coining forward every day, and some 
of the new rules are simply old ones 
dressed over. The Haberdasher recently 
published the following : 

The man that runs his shop on modern 
lines never allows his assistants : 

To insist that a customer take some- 
thing he does not want. 

To persist in trying to sell goods no 
one wants.' 

To rush a customer as soon as he en- 
ter the place. 

To be familiar with patrons. 

To stand in the doorway. 

To assemble in groups and pass the 
" cup of scandal." 

To " knock " one another. 

To do more than their share or less 
than their share of the work. 

To make it difficult for a customer to 
exchange goods. 

To recommend anything to customers 
that is not just what it is represented to 
be. 

To keep customers waiting- one second 
Longer than it is necessary for change. 

To give all their attention to easy sell 
ers. 

To keep their showcases in bad condi- 
tion. 

To chew gum or tobacco.- 

To get tired with testy customers. 

Or flirtations with female ones. 

To imagine that their services are in- 
dispensable. 

Or that they are the whole establish- 
ment. 

To forget to do what they promised. 

To be either shabby or dirty. 

To be ignorant of the values of goods. 

Or to talk about things they do not 
understand. 

To accept gifts from wholesalers. 

To take presents for pushing goods. 

Tip attend to social affairs during busi 
ness hours. 

To " knock " other establishments. 

To talk about events of the day with 
.iiistomers. 

HARDWARE FOR KING EDWARD 
HOTEL. 

Hardware ami Metal was in error 

last week in saving that The Belleville 
Hardware Co., Limited, had supplied the 
hardware for the King Edward Hotel, 
Toronto, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 



Wholesale Hard- 
Limited, ware Merchants. 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Barb Wire, 
Hay Wire, 
Cut Nails, 
Wire Nails, 
Cordage, 
Glass, 
Etc. 



The Only 
Exclusive 
Wholesale 
Hardware Firm 
Between 
Montreal 

and 
Toronto. 



Tarred and 

Dry Sheathing, 
Tarred Felt, 
Rosin, Pitch, 
Chopping Axes, 
Broad Axes, 
Cross Cut Saws, 
Etc. 

A complete stock of Lumbermen's and Builders' Hardware always on hand. A Trial Solicited. 
ZPIRIOES ZRIG-ZEIT. ASK FOE PRICES. 



Use Syracus 



eifc>fc>it.-c Me-tal 



11 IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum. Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc., alwavs in stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Gold Street, New Vork. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



ATKINS cTo H s °sTu fc T' SAWS 



ARE SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS IN MATERIAL, I I. M 
ISS-CUT k3/A WW a3 PER, WORKMANSHIP, FINISH and CUTTING QUALITIES. 

OUR VICTOR, TUTTLE TOOTH AND SEGMENT GROUND SAWS ARE THE FAVORITES IN THE CAMPS 



£ 



THE iMCTOR 
LAMCEfV^ TOOTH 



'^z^^mntfj 



E CATKINS* GO INDIANAPOLIS 



7/UU 



,WNW 



E. C. ATKINS & Co., 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. 



Lhading MANUFACTUKfcKs of HIGH-GRADE, CROSS-CUT, HAND, BAND, 
CIRCULAR, HACK, BACK, WOOD ani> SMALL SAWS or ah kinds. 



Write for Catalogue and Pi 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York: 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. Galvanized Plain Wire 

Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Morse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 



42 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PARTNERSHIP IN BUSINESS 

A Paper Read to the Members of the Ottawa Retail Grocers' Association, 
by Mr. Chas. J. Provost, President. 



1 PARTNERSHIP in business is in my 
opinion conducive to success, but 
while holding thai opinion I am open 
to conviction, hence mj reason for bringing 
ibis subject before you for discussion. 

Mom o( you are aware that I have car- 
ried on business both as an associate 
member of a firm as well as an individual 
one, and with such experience 1 feel that 1 
can speak on this matter with more or less 
practical knowledge. My intention is not 
to dwell on this important subject at any 
great length, but to point out in a con- 
densed form what 1 believe to be 

SOME ADVANTAGES OF PARTNERSHIP, 

« 

trusting it will bring forth a discussion 
which will be of benefit to the Association. 
1 feel assured that you will debate intel- 
ligently and more clearly than 1 can. 

After giving the subject particular atten- 
tion and stud\, I came to the conclusion 
that partnership possesses, among other 
things, the following advantages : 

It promotes a friendly rivalry ; it is an 
incentive to greater effort ; it prevents 
hasty conclusions; it simplifies difficult 
problems ; it promotes good judgment ; it 
is the means of bringing new and useful 
ideas to the front at all times. 

NEED FOR CONSULTATION. 

Those who conduct a business individu- 
ally will agree with me when I say that 
hardly a day passes but we have reason to 
consult some of our clerks on one or more 
of the main questions with which we have 
to deal. It may be in reference to the 
opening of a new account or the closing of 
others, or in regard to purchases we are 
about to make or the improvements of 
some part of our commercial system. 

I'pon ibis and many other matters we 
naturally seek the advice of our employes, 
whom we suppose to be interested in our 
welfare. Is it always consistent to do so? 

Is the clerk whose whole time is devoted 
to attending to the numerous details con- 
nected with a clerk's duties prepared lo 
advise ? I say, no. 

One must think before he can advise, 
but to think requires time, and this the 
clerk is often denied; or is it reasonable to 
expect ail employe to spend lii-s leisure 
hours in devising new schemes or doing 
part of the thinking for his employer? Will 



a man work with the same zeal and inter- 
est when not working \ov himself? Then, 
again, employes as a rule are 

NOT DISPOSED 

to bring forward new projects or tender 
advice unsolicited, although they might 

in main instances prove profitable, for 
fear that they will not meet with ap- 
proval or that their advice will not 
be appreciated. It is different with 
a partner, who assumes the same 
amount of responsibility, whose interests 
are identical to yours. Self pride guides 
him in his words and actions. A great 
deal can be learned bv exchanging ideas 
and by comparing notes with a partner. 
His advice is of great assistance in arriving 
at a decision. 

PARTNERSHIP PROMOTES AMBITION. 

Experience has taught me that partner- 
ship promotes ambition and tends to pro- 
long the activity so essential to the success 
of any business ; it expels dullness, which 
often appears, because a man who is in 
business alone it satisfied with what he 
does himself ; it is also clearly proven to 
me that to be and remain partners in 
business the spirit of acquiescence should 
be cultivated, and must of necessity be the 
prevailing spirit between members of a 
firm. 

HOW TO CHOOSE A PARTNER. 

I might mention before closing, one idea 
I have as lo how to choose a partner. I 
have referred to the clerk in the store as 
hardly the right person to expect advice 
from. I do not hesitate in saying that 
where it is at all possible merchants should 
hold out the offer of partnership in their 
business to clerks as inducements for 
faithful service. There are many clerks 
who possess I he necessary qualifications to 
become successful merchants. 

CLERKS EXPECT TO HO INTO BUSINESS. 

The clerk who has ability naturally 
expects lo go into business for himself. 
When the lime arrives ihat he can realize 
his ambition he, as a rule, begins business 
where he is acquainted. And here is 
where an employer is likely to suffer most. 
I don't mean to say that every clerk can 
be considered for partnership, but if you 
are in business alone I claim partnership 
is better, and a good clerk who has proven 
a faithful servant is the first choice as an 
associate member. 



1 shall not dwell any further on this very 
important question, but hope when it 
comes up for discussion that, all things 
considered, the ideas brought out shall be 
o( some benefit to the members of this 
Association. 



THE 'IDEAL" CUSHION PAD. 

THE many accidents to horses, par- 
ticularly in the cities, during the 
last few weeks, has done much lo 
arouse interest in the cushion horseshoe 
pads manufactured by The Dunlop Tire 
Co., Limited, Toronto. The "Ideal" 
seems to meet with most general favor. 
This pad can be used with a toe calk and 
is particularly adapted for fall and winter 
use. It prevents slipping, concussion, 




sore and strained tendons, etc. That part 
which comes in immediate contact with 
I he hoof is made of 1^ or more plys oi 
frictioned-cotton duck, put together under 
2,000 lb. hydraulic pressure. It is, there- 
fore, not so healing as either leather or 
rubber and will hold the nails belter than 
either. Having no stitching to cut into, 
it can be readily attached and trimmed to 
the varying shapes of horses' feel. Hard- 
ware dealers who handle blacksmithing 
goods should slock " Ideal " cushion pads. 



I; ('. B rump ton, general merchant, of 

Red Deer, \A\.'L, has sold out to Oui- 
mette & Wallace, who take possession on 
l-'lii uarv 15. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MKTAL 







rL ^ 



HARNESS PREPARATIONS. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 

HARNESS DRESSING 



Recognised m 

" THE STANDARD. " 

Produce! ■ brilliant jot 

Mark glOSS w blob "111 not 
peel or -Hint ami to which 
dirt will not stick. 



m» 



FRANK MILLEBS 

HARKED 2RESSIK0 



itll n**r-'» Klixza CO 




Frank Miller's 

Harness Soap 

liirivaled t'nr 

cleaning, and soft- 
ening Harness. 

Put up in cakes, 

pans, boxes and 
tubs. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil, 



Preserves and softens the leather, 
hus adding life. 

The highest quality of oil on the 
market. 



rJARA'ESSl 
OIL 

iBLACKlNO 

----- ~ZF 

»., - • ,.,., 
'"■IRANK MILL! HI* 
Nir YOflt- 



horse Blankets says - Dutch 

UflDGC PrWCDO Black w»d Brown 
nUnot UL>VLnO Waterproofs 

SWEAT PADS I££ dart wi '" ' ' 

Enquiries solicited. 
HENRY F. FALKINER 
60 George Street - T0B0NT0 




h 

I 
O 

cr 



GET THE ORICINAL. 
W« lead, others imitate. 

E. T. WRIGHTS CO., 



LAMB FENCE 

Rigid because it has a hard wire upright. 
The H. R. LAMIi FENCE CO., Limited, London, Ont. 



Your First Order 

is sufficient to show the good quali- 
ties of our Brown and Manilla 
wrapping papers. 

They are strong and durable. 
They are good weight. 
- Full 480 sheets to the ream. 

MADE IN CANADA 
by the 

CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



Steward & Romaine Mfc. Co 

EXPANSION and 
TOGGLE BOLTS 

l)g .ill kinil 

Stone 01 i ement, 
L24 Norlh Sixth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

GALVANIZING 

Our plant Is mi 

Meet ok. Other bram i ■ 
WINDMILLS, PUMPS, TANKS, 
FOUNDRY WORK ETC., ETC 
Ontario Wind Engine ft Pump Co , Limited, 

S05 Atlantic 6vo Toronto. 



Fire Clay 
and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement. 



STOVE BRICK 

All kinds of lira ( lay prodm 

order from pattern*. Writs Ibi Price List. 

JONES BROS., •"".SK^-Jife, "' 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING. 



ManutMctarrrs. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



8lmplest 
Take Down ' 
Cun Made. 




WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very i 
m liberal. Atrial order solicited. Write for discounts. 



s. 



99 Niagara St., TORONTO FILE CO. 

CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS. 



We have several large consignments of special sizes of 32-oz.. 26-oz. and 21-oz. 
Glass just arrived, and can fill all orders for large and odd-sized windows for 
dwellings, etc. Heavy stock of all kinds of Window Glass, and can make 
prompt shipment. Prices are right. It will pay you to send us your specifications. 

Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited, London, Canada. 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER OIBB. 13 St. John St .MONTREAL 
73 YEARS. ESTABLISHED IHH. 7* YEARS. 



44 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A CORNER FOR CLERKS. 



MEN "t ureat achievement are char- 
acterized by their ability to grasp 
situations quicklj and to seize op- 
portunities, says a writer in Success. 
Their vision is clear j they understand 
conditions thoroughly; they act without 
hesitancy or doubt of results; hence, in 
most instances, they carry their purposes 
to a successful issue. 

I hose who accomplish great things do 
not do so by unusual straining or an ex- 
hausting ,. input of mental or physical en- 
.1. Pierpont Morgan, for example, 
in the execution of his colossal schemes, 
not seem to exert any great effort. 
II. achieves his ends with apparent ease 
because of the lucidity of his ideas and 
his strong grasp upon situations. 

The steel tools driven by the great 
cams in our shipbuilding yards go 
through solid steel plates with as much 
ease, seemingly, as the fingers of a cook 
go through yielding dough, because of 
the huge balance wheels whose mighty 
momentum, without jarring or straining, 
overcomes all obstacles. So, great work- 
ers compass vast results by the momen- 
tum of their intellects, their clear com- 
prehension of conditions, and their ready 
mastery of complicated situations. 

Such minds as these are self-contained, 
self reliant, confident. They do not but- 
tonhole every friend or acquaintance they 
chance to meet, and ask his advice or 
opinion in regard to their plans. They 
do not consult subordinates or equals ; 
they simply look over the ground and 
study it carefully, as a skillful general 
studies his plan of the battleground be- 
Ire leads his army to action, and 
then they a ct. 

A noticeable example of this stamp of 
mind is General Kitchener, one of the 
mosl remarkable personalities of our 
time. Silent, stern, immovable, when a 
purpose is once formed, this hero of many 
hard-won battles is a sphinx-like type of 
concentrated power, lie forms his plans 
unaided and executes them with the pre- 
cision and force of a huge engine. His 
chief of stall was the only one who knew 
anything of his intended movements when 
he started one day on an important ex- 
pedition during the recent war in South 
Africa. He simply ordered a locomotive, 
a guard van, and a carload of " Tom- 
mies." Orders were given to clear the 
track. Everything had to stand aside for 
him. No warning was allowed to be tele- 
graphed ahead. He arrived on the spot 
without previous notice, and no general 
in the army knew when or where he 
might appear. 



Another incident of his South-African 
campaign is strikingly characteristic of 
the man. About six o'clock one morn 
tag he paid an unheralded visit to the 
.Mount Nelson Hotel, (ape Town, scanned 
the register, and found there the names 
of officers who should have been on duty. 
Without a word to anyone, he went per- 
sonally to the rooms of the offenders and 
1. -ft the following notice: "A special train 
leaves for the front at 10 a.m.; the troop- 
ship leaves at 4 p.m. for England; you 
have your choice, sir." He would listen 
to no excuses, no parleying, no apologiz- 
ing: that was his ultimatum, and every 
officer knew what he meant. 

He wields an absolute power over those 
under him, because of his positiveness, 
his self-possession, his consciousness of 
being equal to any emergency, whatever 
it may be. Everything about him is in- 
dicative of strength, largeness, and 
breadth of make-up. Free from petty 
vanity or any desire for praise or flat- 
tery, he has a frank contempt for all so- 
cial distinctions and frivolities. His per- 
sonality has all the impressiveness of 
some great natural force, working out its 
purpose silently, effectively, and with the 
certainty of doom. 

The conquering General is not an en- 
dearing character, it is true, his subor- 
dinates fearing rather than loving him ; 
neither is he, any more than that other 



forceful character, .). I'ierpont Morgan, 
a model type of man in every respect; 
but both men possess in an eminent de- 
gree those qualities of self-confidence, con- 
centration, firmness, promptness, decision 
and ability to grasp situations which 
everyone who would be successful must 
cultivate, the measure of one's success 
and ability to grasp situations which 
he develops these indispensable qualities. 

Men who have a wide grasp of in- ^ 

tellect and firmness of decision are al- 
ways positive. They know what they 
want and are never on the fence. They 
do not waste their lime shilly-shallying, 
seeking advice, balancing opinions, or 
splitting hairs. They decide upon a course 
of action, and then pursue it without 
hesitation or svavering. 



WRITING ADVERTISEMENTS. 

While there is no particular virtue in 
writing an advertisement on a milk-and- 
water plan, neither is there anything gained 
by giving it so much enthusiasm that it will 
fairly consume itself. Folks rather like to 
supply some of the information themselves. 
It is human nature for the average reader 
to give a fact, plainly put, a coating of extra 
strength in his own mind. When a man 
reads an advertisement that strains and 
does its level best to convince him, that man 
generally takes it with a pinch of salt. He 
would not be human if he were otherwise. 
But, if the advertisement is laid along dis- 
passionate lines, giving its arguments 
calmly and truthfully, without undue agi- 
tation, the reader does not feel called upon 
to argue against it, because the feeling does 
not layhold of him thatthat advertisement 
is working to win him over in spite of 
himself. 



Apollo galvanized iron is 
all alike; if not, send back 
to your jobber at our ex- 
pense — we shall hear of it. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

6o St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 







H. Boker & Co 's registered brand of " King Cutter " Razors is their finest 
production in quality. Equal to same are : 

"KOH l-NOOR," SOLD BY CAVERHILL. LEARMONT * CO., MONTREAL. 
"TRUE BLUE," SOLD BY RICE LEWIS A SON, TORONTO. 

"KING CUTTERS" Sold by all leading wholesale houses. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



January 2. 1903. 

The*, p ■ ■ i "'" h qualities and 

quantities as are usuall] ordered by retail 

I, ;1 |, n I" usual ti run of credit, the 

loweal figun a being foi largei quantitl 
prompt pay. Largt cash buyers ■ ;> >> fre- 
quently make purchases al better prices I he 
Editor is anxious to be informed al onceol 
any apparent enon n this list, as the di Irt 
in to make ii perfectly accurate, 

METALS. 

TIN 
I. anil, and Flag and Straits 

m<1 28-11. int!t.ts, I i *29 mi *»' mi 

TIXI'I.ATK.s 

Oharooal Plates Bright 

Mis. equal to Bradlej Pet hot 

[0, usual sixes £6 75 

I \ 825 

I \ \ 9 7S 

famous, equal to Bradley 

l (' ' ; 

i \ 

I \ \ .... 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Grades 

I ( . n~n.ll -i. • - 5 00 

I \ g mi 

I \ \ 7 00 

I X X X " 8 00 

I" i I I i ; 4 50 

I > \ 5 36 

Ii \ \ 

Ooke Plata Bright 
Bessemer Steel 

I I usual i ik'.m I 00 

I.C, si I 50 

10x38 9 00 

Oharooal Plates Terne, 
Dean nr .1 <; Grade 

l i . 30x38, 113 -l" sta 

i\ . Tame Tin 10 91 

Oharooal Tin Boiler Plate*. 
Cookie) Grade 

KX.14 bxs I 

•• 14x60, ■• 7 mi 

- 14x85, " • 

Tinned Bhi 
7 - J v.4«i up to Jl gauge B 00 

s 50 

111. IN \NH -I I 1 I 

Common bar, per 100 lb 2 05 

Refined " " 3 15 

hiM' Iron ■' -.'in 

Hoop steel, 11 to3-in. lias.- 8 90 

Sleigh shoe steel, " . . . 1 In 

eel -' 30 '.' '-I 

Reeled machinery. 3 00 

■ 

T Ftrthftl o stool steel, per lb 13| 13 

: - t....| uteri 'I 14 

\l I U ii 13 

Black Diamond and I 

tool slot l III ii 

Chas. Leonard's tool steel n 08 00 

1'ark s "Silver tool steel IS It 

■■ Bpecia] ' ll 1"> II '.II 

Jonas ft Corn 10 o 80 

" Air Hardening o 7u 

I>rill steel, per lb 08 10 

BOH i i: i i BBS Par root, 

II. Hand 4 Inch 

2lin 16 

3 in 13 

S,in 16 

4 in 31 



STEEL BOILER PLATE 

; in 9 SO '.' 60 

3 60 '.'7ii 

| in. and thicker I 50 J 60 

BLACK SHEETS Com. Ml 

in and l- gauge ... '.' 56 '-' 7.". 

18 gauge 2S 3 00 

111 2 85 3 00 

33 to 24 gauge 2 96 

96 " 3 05 3 60 

28 " . 3 16 

OOFPBB W i l.i 
Discount, 50 per oent. 

OAK \i>\ PLATES. 

All .lull. 59 sheets. 9 00 3 60 

.fished 3 00 3 10 

All bright 3 75 H'. 

IRON I'll'K. 
Black pine Per 100 feel 

iiiuli 3 IK) 3 25 

9 30 9 v> 

" 2 li'i 

" 2 85 

•• 3 65 

•' 5 30 

11 '• 7 36 

ij " 8 95 

12 55 

2.' " .... 2100 

3 " 

31 " 32 00 

4 '■ 38 50 

i 46 00 

5 •' 18 00 

6 " 63 1)0 

UalTahixed pips 

I inch .' ... 3 20 

; '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.'.'. 

I • 7 20 

II " 

r " 12 20 

3 " .... 16 85 
Malleable PHI 1 1 mnl 30 p,c. 
in Fittings 
On all east iron fittings, including plugs, 
tmnbings, unions an. 1 nipples, 50 \ 10 p.C .lis. 
All others discount 80 p c 

.. \i.\ kNlZSD BHBBTa Queen's 

Q c Cornel Bell Head 



16 gauss 








18 to 34 gaugi 


3 75 


1 n. 


1 35 


4 00 3 90 






4 96 I 06 


4 50 


American I. run. Is. 94 4n for 38 


gauge. 




1 Iota l" to 15) 




txtra. 




. II MS 






i .1. 3-16 In . per 100 lb 












- 10 


S 16 








i 








7-16 






I 10 


9-16 




4 -.11 








4 -1 


) 




4 00 


4 60 


; 









kennel and p t«i ami 

.'. per cent, 

Tie ...it chains 
stall fixtures 

, tin 45 p ■ 

Jack chain, iron. siiiKle ami double, .1 - 

Jack chain, brass, angle and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 



OOP?] I- 

Ingol Pel 100 lb 

English B.8 . tor, lots 13 00 

Lake Superioi 

' - 

4 'hi lengths, round, | to - in. . 23 mi 95 00 

round and square, 

I to 2 inches 93 00 

Bheel 
Plain, 14 ../ . uml light, 16 ../ , 

14x48 and 14x60 33 00 93 50 

Plain, 14 ../ , mi. I tight, 16 oz.. 

irregular sizes 33 50 33 mi 

Tinned ooppei sheel 34 00 

Planished . . 32 00 

Braziers' (In sic • 

1x6 ii . 95 to 30 lb. ca.-h, per lb o 23 

35 to 45 " " .... i) 39 

50-11.. and above " .... 21 

BOILER A XI) T K I'll I - 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per H. II 32 

BRASS 

Rod .ui.l Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent 

She. is. hard-rolled. 3x4 23 

Till. inn. base, per lb. 23J 

7.1 Nc SPELTER. 

ii, per loo ll. 6 50 6 oo 

li.-ni' ' 

ZIN< SUM 1 

5-i •»■(. casks 6 

Pari disks ii 2". 6 50 

LEAD 
Imported Pig, i>. i 100 lb 3 50 

Bar, pel Ii. 06 

sheets, 2' lb. sq. ft . by roll 

. 3 to 6 lb. " 08 

\.. 1 1 i ii. she) i - < per tb . > \t rs Pipe, 
by the roll, usual mights per yard, lists al 7c 
per lb miil 37 i |. . .lis f ill., Toronto 

N'.ii (Jut lengths, not price, «.,-i. pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHOT. 

per 100 II. : chill.. 

per 100 Hi: bock, seal and ball, - D 

count. 39) p . Prioi i an t . I 'opinio. 

Hamilton, Montreal. St John and Halifax 

3 p . cash, freights equalised. 

BOIL I'll'K. VM) Kill l\..- 
Ughl >mi1 pipe, dial ount, 4". i" 

fittings, -li- "'ii.' 50 I- 
...I Extra heary pipe fittings, .lis 50 and 

111 per cent 

7 and B In pipe, discount 4". per osnl 

SOI I'l I. Pei 11. 

Bar, half-and-half , guaranteed 30 

if .ui.l half, ... miner, ial 
Refined 
Wiping n 17 

\M IM'.NV 

|.. r |b 9 ' 'I 

WIIITK I.I \H 1 100 lb 
'. .1. 
4 621 4 871 

N 

N 3 I7| 

N ' 

Munro - Select Flake White 

I I | 

Brand nuine 7 '■' 

\ I 

6 12) 
I ' Pun 5 98 

Essei (ienuine . 5 50 



Kill I I \li 

(ienuine, 560 lb • ,i-k-. percwl M 73 

(le • imi ll. k.us. 

So l. 580 ll. . asks, i» i . »t 

Mo 1. 100 lb kegs, per cwl i « 

WHITE 7.1 m 

Extra Red .-■ al 01 

No i o ., 

ii ii, ii 86 

l>l:Y w ill i i ll \|. 

i isks 

Pure, kegs 

ks 
No l. k.-^s 

PR] PARI i. PAINTS 

In i. I and I Kail... 



i Hon 

Second qualities, pel gallon 

Barn (In i.l.ls i 

Th. sheiMin Williams paint 
( 'anaila Paint I 

Toronto Lead ft ColorC 

Sander- ■■ i 

si. ».,n a \\,»h| ■ ( hami.ioii 

pure 
Standard Paint Co - Si « 

The Krac 
" Ark brand 

British X;i\ \ deck 

i OLORS in mi. 
ns, Standard (juatltj 



Venetian red. jmt lb 
( Ihrome yellow 
Golden ochre 
French 

Marine I. lack 
Chronic cre.H 

i Imperial green . 

Signwriten biai 
Hiirnt umbat 

loons 
Raw umber 

ana 



n 12 

,, ,,S 



i OLORS DR1 

i ..nun. .ii ochre, bbis l B 

Yelloa ochn J l I - 

Yellow ochre [La B i r, 

' - ■. to. 

Venn. I,l,| 

Knglish . 

I 25 
I 55 

Super in 

Hurnt sienna, pure. |ht |i 
amber, 

Kiih ilmU-r 

Drop i-: 

( hp.me yellow, pun 

t'hmmi . 

ttoklen ; 

t'ltran 

is.k.-s, per lb 

' ■ ' !. 

M 

N 
Whiting, i.l. I . 55 

III. I I -I..M 
Casks, for spraying, pet 



I 9B 

1 i»i 

90 

1 40 

1 '.It 

1 00 

1 30 

1 90 

1 .50 



Ii 14 
10 
n6 
009 
10 

n 11 
n 11 

') 11 



1 30 

- • 

2 00 
00* 

1 M 

ii 10 
060 

35 



07 
06 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WADE & BUTCHER'S 

"SPECIAL" Razors 

Are unequalled for quality and finish. 

JAMES HUTTON <2 CO., - MONTREAL 

Sole Agents for Canada. 



II TTY. 
Hulk in bbk 

luantit] 

Bladders m bbh 

Bladders in ki i bwr 2 40 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 36 

Bladders in 131 1>> tins 2 65 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 1001b. 2 90 

\ irnishbs 

[nS-gaLlota. Per gal Net. 

ie.No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pal.- durable bods HO 4 95 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Uold size, japan 2 85 3 00 

irown japan 085 090 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 1 25 

No. 1 1 10 

Hard oil finish 165 175 

Light ..il finish 1 40 1 60 

Damar 1 70 1 85 

Shellac white 2 35 2 45 

orange 2 25 2 35 

Turpentine, brown Japan — 1 25 1 30 

black japan 85 1 20 

No. 1 50 75 

F.la.-tilite- varnish. 1 gal ran. each. . 2 00 

ine Boor finish, pet gal 

Maple Leal coach enamels; size 1, $1.20; 
size -. 70c : si/..- 3. 40c. each. 

Sh.rwin-Williains copal varnish, assorted 
-in | jit> i" 1 gaL, $2.50. 

. ASTOB "II. 

Baal India In i a* -. perl o 10 

small lets 10 104 

COD OIL, ETC 

Cod oil, pet gal 50 55 

1 20 

" neatsfoot 90 

OL1 I 

Common 08 09 

medal.... 10 14 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

<;. latin. 25 30 

... 18 20 

19 20 

Hiittn.-r 15 16 



HARDWARE. 
kJOfl si I toil. 

idges 

l; i; c &pe Dominion, 50 and 5 j» 
Rim Fir. PistoL discount 40 p.c. . American. 
Ilini I inion, 50 and 5 p.c 

lifle, 10 p.c . Aiiii-i 
i Domin- 

ion, 30 ]m-i - 

:-Kir.- Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary. Dominion, IS pet 

i Fir.-. Militarj and Sporting, 
idd 5 per oei 
discount M pet cent . An 

i and empty Shells, "Trap and 
25 per cent Rival 
and Nitr-,. Pi per - enl advance on list. 
Krasx Shot Shells, 55 per cent 
Primers, Dom ,30] "1 80 

per lb. 

thick white felt wadding, in i -lb 

$1 oo 
hick liniwn or grey felt wads, in 

7'J 
Beat thick whiu card wads, in boxes 
of 500 each, 12 and ■mailer gauge 

,rd wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, lo gauge . 35 

of 500 each, 8 gaugi 

of 1,000 each, 

■niullc-r gang- 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1.000 

25 
Thin I ' 1.000 

- .-a Igi 



Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxt - ol 250 i at h Per M, 

11 and small. -r gauge 60 

9 and in gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, beet white doth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each 
11 and smaller gaugi 1 16 

9 and io gauges 1 to 

; and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 

vhzes. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

urn t.s. 
Wright's, 80-lb. and over 101 

Hay (Sudden, 80 lb. and over 091 

]. I -. gO-lb and over 11} 

vi .. . 
Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent off list 

AXES 

t Ihopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes. 40 per cent 

Broad Axes. 25 per cent 

Hunters Axes 5 50 6 00 

kxes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Ax.-s 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

AXLE ..Pl.AsI: 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

BATH TIBS. 
Zinc- 6 '"I 

Copper, discount 15 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS 

standard Enameled. 
b rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

54 2nd " 20 00 

BABHIT MET VI. 

"Tandem, A per lb 27 

B " 21 

c " om 

Friotionle-ss Metal '■ 23 

Hercules ' 15 

Syracuse- Smelting Works: 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government " " 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

S|,. rial 25 

onj 022 

Car Box 20 

I . 15 

The Canada Metal Co. ; 

So "O t»bbil ci oc. 

V 1 babbit 08 

o 10 

Hercules " 15 

Metallic ■ 20 

Imperial " o ;so 

BELLS. 

Hand. 

60 per cent 
Nickel, 55 per ct at 

Cow. 

American make-, discount 03^ per cent 
Canadian, discount 46 and 50 per cent 
Doe - 

5 60 8 00 
i : Lscounl 16 pet cent 
Farm 

American, each 125 300 

House. 
American, per lb 035 040 

1:1 I i 

II 1 iM-r doz 3 35 17 

a ... : .ii io o<t 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 |icr cent 



11EI.I1NC. 

Extra, 60 per cent 
Standard, 60 and io per cent 

No 1, not Wider than 6 in . OH. 10 and 1(1 per 

cent . 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 76 per cent 

Mils 

Auger. 
* - 1 1 1 , is, discount 00 anel 5 per cent, 

Rockford, discount .50 and lo per cent 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Cal 
(iilmour's, 471 to 50 jeer cent 
Expansive. 

Clark's, 40 per cent. 

tiilulet. 

Clark's, pet doz o 65 o 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLINP ANI> BED STAPLES. 

All size-s, per lb 07J 12 

BOLTS AM. m is Pi i . . ,,i 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list] 55 anel 10 

■' full sip ($2 W list) 55 and 10 
Norway Iron (S3 

list) 50 and 10 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 50 and 10 

Plough Kelts 50 and 10 

Blank Bolts 50 and 10 

Boll Ends 50 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe- Bolts ' 65 and 10 

( 'oaeh Screws, cone point 66< and 10 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3,'c. per lb, "If 
Neils, hexagon, all size-s. 4c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods, per lb., 5j to 6c 
Nuts, in 50-lb. lots, {c, per lb, extra; io less 
than 50-lb. lots, |c, e-xtra. 

BOOT calks. 

Small and uieilium, ball per M 4 25 

Small heel " 4 5C 

BBIIJHT VVIKE ennuis 

Discount 02.' per c-ent. 

BROII.KIts 

Bight, discount 65 to 674 per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 671 per cent 
Vegetable, per doz.. discount 37$ per cent, 

Henis, N0..8 per doz 6 00 

Henis, No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 

1.1 11 HBR8 1 I.I ie 1 1 - 

German tier doz, 6 00 



11 00 
20 00 



11 I- IIKH KNIVES. 

Battel - perdoz, 60 6 30 

111 'ILIUM; PAPER. I 11 

Tarred Felt per 1001b 1 77- 

Ready rooting, 2-ply, not under 45 lb., 

pet roll " '."i 

Rl ad] roofing, 3-ply. not under 65 lb., 

pei roll 1 15 

' pel Fe-ll per ton 45 IIP 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 41X1 sq. ft. 35 

Tat - " too - 45 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 50 

1. 1 Fibre 100 " 60 

O.K.1LX.L..., " 400 " 

l; 1-1 siz.-.l " 400 " 40 

Oiled Sheathing.... 600 " 1 10 

Oiled .... " 400 " 70 

Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Root small packages ' 25 

It. tiled Tin per barrel 4 50 

I'ar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

l: Mm- Pitch per 100 1b. 85 

111 I.I. II1N..S 

Ooppi r, $2 1*1 tor 2} Inch, and $1.90 for 2dnch. 

BITTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
LoOSt I'm -lis- DUnt 



Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint discount 65, 10 and 24 per 01 ill 
Boose- Pin, discount 65, 10 ami 21 percent 
Bi iini Bronzed, discount 70,70 and.", percent 
Gen Bronzed . per pair 40 65 

C Vlll-IM si |:| |, Ml lis 

American per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Billiards " 6 50 

OASTOBfi 
Bed, new lisl, discount 55 to S7j pel cent. 

Plate, discount 524 to 571 pei 

'III IE I.EAIIEHS. 

Nos. ,'d and 32 per gross 8 50 '.' 50 

CHALK. 

Ciupeoi. rs 1 olored, pet gross 16 75 

White lump perewt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

' IIISEI.S. 
Socket, Framing and Fit mi 1 

1:1 oad B, discount 60 and 10 per c.-nt. 

Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent 

P. 8 .v W. Extra, discount 60 and lOpercenl 

CHURNS 

Revolving Churns, metal frames No -- 
No. 1. $8.50; No 2 $9.00; No 3, $10.00 

No. I. sl2.(K); No 5, S16.00 each Ditto, 

" 1 frames, 20c, each less than the above 

Discounts: Delivered from factories, 53 
per cent. ; from stock in Montreal, 51 l" 1 
cent Terms 4 months or 3 per cent, cash in 
30 days. 
churn frames, Including bearings, levers, etc 
Nos 0. 1. 2 and 3, w 1, $2.40; add 4 and 

5, $2.65. Mel nl frames. 25c. extra Bis 
' 15 per cent., net 30 days. 

CLIPS 

Axl.. discount 65 per cent 

1 I.IISETS. \i 1 

Plain York or. Ontario Syphon Jet.. $9 60 

Emb " - " 10 20 

Fillings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Teu svpi Washout 6 00 

Emb. '■ " " 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down K Ifjri 1 1 or Teutonic, plain. 9 60 

Low " " " emb . 10 20 

Plain Richelieu • 3 75 

Emb. " 4 00 

t lonnecl ions 1 25 

Bow Down Ontario Syphon .let. plain 11 70 
l.'.ic " '• " e-ml,cl, 12 30 

1 'loset connection 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 70 

Basins, oval. 17 I 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 v 15-in 2 25 

' "Mr IBS! 8, DTI mips. ETC. 

\ in» 1 nan. discount 621 to 65 per cent 

COM in in* l-ll-l: 

Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

3 " ■' I i»i 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 

i B v IiI.es, OBAIN. 

Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per e. a| 

08801 i svw ii i miles. 

S A I) No 3 p.-i pan 

s \ I). " 5 " 22] 

S. &D„ " 6 " 15 

Boj '.nil pattern " 20 

DOOR BPBINOB 

a Rod (15 p.c), per doz 2 00 

Coil " 88 1 60 

English " 2 00 4 00 

IIHAVV KNIVES. 

Coach and Wagon, discount 60 and 10 per 

< . nl 

( "arpc mors , .it count 60 and 10 per cent 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



IT 



We've Got You Solid 



if you commence handling our 



Building Papers, Roofing Felts and Wire-Edged Ready Roofing 



BECAUSE our goods please your customers, and, after all, the 
consumer is the man behind the com in such matters. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



"Toronto and Montreal. 



dm i a 

ilaml 
Kills, per doz., net li>' 
nitii.t Bl rs 
Ifoi liacoun I i in per cent, 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 56 per cent 

i ii i i i - 
( i'iiiiiiiiii. oork-Hned, discount 35 percent 

KWM ROI UH8 

in, ml, per 100 fl 

i i BOWS M"H ']■!! 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 2o 

7 inch " 1 36 

Polished, 16c per dozen ■ 

I -. I I. Ill "Vs 

is, i roaxos i-i vs 
Iron, discount 40 per cent 

i v. i • > i; \ Mil k I i\- 
int utt* i. \i>. .1 list, to per cent 

> ti i. i LBPS 

u estei n 70 and 10 pi i cent 

70 " 10 

K. ;.ui. i ,\ Foot 70 " 10 

D tons 70 " 10 

:hi 7u " 10 

.1 Barton Smith 70 " 10 

\l i i. Uan 70 " 10 

.70 " 10 
v holson, 60and 10 to 60, 10 and :. 
BO 

, 75 

Black Diamond, BOand 1" in 60\ lo and 

eenl 
Jowitt's, English list 35 to 37J percent 
Nichol i Simplicity " file handle, 

_r.iss 85o. In 51.60, 

• .I I" 

\v indow, Box Price 

star |i Dial i 

I nited Pi Pi P Pi 

In. I.. - SOfl 100 fl SO It toofi. 

Under 96 2 SO t •.'.". 

•.v, t.. to •_' to t 66 

it I .". I" 

:.i t.i 80 ."> 36 

hi ti. 70 9 76 

71 to 80 11 ini 

; i»i 

7 r ■ 15 no 

■'1 in 95 17 .Mi 

[00 -J) .Ml 

■ M i.l - 

Marking, Mortise, i 
Statue* s. discount 60 t" 65 per cent 

Wii. i 

H t.> 33 each l 66 2 m 

II M I 

Hope, . mi li 

100 

nch .... " .... 14 00 

I., athi r, 1 inch per .1"/ 3 87) t '"' 

r, 1} " " "■ 30 

fl 1 s7 

II V VI U 

Null 
■ "lint 3 I" 1" i udian 

• lis,, unit 25 to 37) per cent 

Turk 

n ,|M'f ill>/. 1 10 1 90 

* 

Canadian pi i r : 08J 

Hull Ivan 
English and Canadian, i"-r lb 33 

II (Mill - 
\ > ml 1 50 

door per doz 1 00 1 50 



Pork 



Ho 



i .v i: discount i" i r revised list 

l list 



nv 1st i 



1 00 



pairs 


6 00 


5 on 


, ," 


a in 


in 80 




31 no 


ii hi 1 



i 8 i; discount to per cent., 

Saw 
American pel doz 

Plane 

\ in i" i gross 3 15 

llniiiiiiii and Batohel 
Canadian, discount ffrper o int. 
• .... rut Baws 
i iiiKi.liiin per pair 13] 

II VM. Kits, doz. 

Steel barn door 

I inch 

■Vinrll 

red 

No. 11. 6 fool run 

N" II J, 10 foot run 

V' I- in l. ".I run 

No. 14, 15-foot run 

Lane's O.K.T nark, pet t""i — 

HAItV EST I 

Discount 60 and in per cent 

It VII 111 I - 

Canadian, discount 10 to i- pi i oent 

HIV. 

Blind, !' cent 

II. aw T and strap, tin., per Hi 

5-in., " ui»., 

6-in , " n 06 

8 in . •■ ii n:., 

lo in . o n:.; 

I.iKht T and si rap, disc I 66 and ."> pi ■ 

and hinge 

i'. I" 10 in pel in i II. t 60 

12 in up " 

Spring, . ., per gro. pairs .... 10 60 

H ".ir. .it . .lis,-,, nnt 80to 60 anil 10 

per icnt. 

Planter per doz. I oo t 50 

lliil.l.ivv vv UU 
Discount 15 and 5 pel oent 

BOOKS 

hull 

llinl oagl . |"i dOJ II 60 I HI 

Clothes Inn " o 27 o 63 

n "o 7-.' o 88 

ii • .i coal pi ' -'" i hi .< 00 

Chandelier per doe 50 1 00 

W i njgfal Iron 

Wrought I ks in i.l staples, Canadian .lis 

count i 

fl 

Hat ami • "at. discount !■"> per cent 

i. ,,. i i I... n go 

nt 

BOB81 \ VII - 

Oval 

VI 
| 'lit 

H -nt. 

.' dis 

BOBBMB 

I ' ' i. Montreal 

\ i 

ami anil 

nnallei 
Light, medium and heevj 

Light 

weight (all -i'. -' 

Kill! li I. .union ami 

Guelph, l"i p 
Toe weight -■• 

I VIVNM I' W VIII 

Pi "rt list. .1.. 

It I in Ks 

pel ii"' •'• '" 



K Kl I I 

B pun, i i ..ti ii. vi list 

I ..pp. i p. i II, II 30 .'ill 

American, 60 an. I 10 t" 65 and 5 pel cent 
ki:i- 
i lanadian .lis 10 t" (0 ami Hi p. 
Cabinet trunk and padlock, 
American pel pose 

KMU1S 

i ' lapanned ami x. P , per 

.1"/ i mi 2 .mi 

Bronze, Berlin per •!"/ 2 7"' 

Bronze, Genuine 6 hi 
Shutter, porcelain, P a I. 

per grass 1 30 t u i 

w hit) dooi km. lis pei .1../ ii 85 1 oo 

11 VV k\ll|s 

Nrt pi i 

1 V M I vv I . h s 

i 'i unl I ' per i ant 

I. V\ lll:v- 

Oold Blast per doz. 7 00 

So fl i .-in - 

Ordinary, with 1 1 burnei . ... I'm 

last 

V, ii 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

i.iM.iv SOI i i /i i- 

Poroelain lined per '1"/ 2 30 

Galvanized " 1 87 3 &i 

King, wood 2 7"> 2 '.hi 

Kins-, glass " 4 oo i .'.ii 

All glass '■ 50 'i 90 

LINKS 

Fish per gross 1 06 2 50 

Chalk •• 1 90 7 I" 

I VVV V M..U I KS 

Woodyatt 12 in whei I .7 60 

5 SO 

Daisy " 190 

Philadelphia, 10-in wheel 6 00 

13 7'. 

int. mi per '''-nt 

I. "I ks 

Canadian, U t.> 10 an. I in pi 

i \ Ki « in . per tin/ 3 oo 

■ Inet. 
Bagle, ilisrtnint SOperoent 

Padlocks. 

English ami \ I.,/ Ml 6 INI 

Scandinavian 1 00 '-' I" 

i discount 2o i - 

M v. 11 iv l si Kl vv - 

Iriin and Bi 
Klat head, discount 3 
Round head, discount 30 p. 

M VIII I s 

Tinsmiths i SO 

Carpenters', hickory, 

Lignum Vitu. 

Caulking, each 1 ki 

M VTI." ks 
I amid' i" pSI ii"/ ."' Ml 

vim ot i n 
American, 'lis grant 33', i* i 
German, 
Gem • it I. l 15 

Milk' IV 1 KIM MINt.s 
Dis, "lint 2"' pel 'flit 

MM- Ini \\ 

3d and -1 3 15 

3.1 .1 |0 

4 and Ml 

3 and 71 2 80 

■i 
10 ami 12.1 

16 and 2nd 

Cut nail 
\v 

- 

Fli.llr I .i 



v VII. ri l i . 
v VII 

Square, round and 
per grass 

Hi. in,.., ,.| pj in i . 

I I IV vi I ii VI. 

2 in Mesh, 19 » | . .ii., 60, l" .... 
vi i,. I heavier, SO p.< 

i ' V k i vi 

p. i ion li, .. i.i 

i S Navj 

• hi. i i - 

Model galvanized 

oil ran. with pump. 5 gallon, 

per dozen in ini 

/.im ami tin. discount 50, Ml and 10 !■• 
Copper p. i ■],./ : 

i ■■ i -, 

Malleable, diaoounl ! 

t. VI v vvi/t |. ivn.s 
..Is. .lis,-, unit l 
Flaring pattern, discount (5 percent 
Galvanized waabtuba, diaoounl 15 pei i ■ nt 

ill , l n vv v l: I 

Discount lu per cent "tr liat, Juni 

10-qt flaring sap i.u 

ii. lo and 14-ql flaring pal 

i Halm i cans, discount to i 

in k- 
Per dozen 6 00 

i-n ii Rg v vlt - 
in head 
Brass bead 40 1 00 

IP II III VV I 1:1 

Tin and gilt discount 75 i»r oral 

rivi 
I pint in im- p. i grass 

PI. Wis 

Wood bench, Cana<lian diaoounl to p. i 

American discount .mi p,-r oent 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 

to per cent 

I'l.WI IPiiV- 

I ■ I .1"/ 2 INI 
U v V|, VII 

liiu-. per .1 
■ 

- imitation i • ■ dot 
German 

ri i 

.1 M I I usln..n vv.irk. .1 
Puller u.uk. di 
6 dozen !"t- and over ..( u 

I'liiuit In p- ■ 

pet oent With, bi l"t« "f 2.1" 

nnt i.f lu |- 
' VI I ,. \ 

Standard Globe. A 

• lis,-,.." 

I M II:, \ 

. i-iii 

• ••■nt 
per ' • 

" 

ill. r . ,, 

1 i-ln 

p.t ami cold 

S 

' tire*. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



-TO IMPORT. 



— - »»■»»> 



^'itmwwwf 



Prompt Deliveries 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BENT GLASS °f a " kinds, our own manufacture. Closest 



rices. 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



Warerooms and Offlces-135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works 209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



PBES8I D BP1 h K8 

• ill. 

PI I I I l< 

Hothouse per doz. o 55 1 on 

\vl, il 22 33 

n 27 1 in 

Awning " 35 2 50 

II MPS 

ban cistern 180 i! tV) 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PI \. hi v 

Sn.1.11. i - per doz 1 00 1 85 

Conductoi • 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid. .. pel Bel ... 72 

hollow per inch — 1 00 

HlM.l BOILERS 

Dominion. 30 gallon net 6 00 

35 " " 7 00 

40 " 8 00 

Id's Galvanized, 30 gallon, " 7 40 

35 " " B HI 

40 " " 9 60 

Copper, 30 gallon " 22 00 

35 " " 24 00 

40 " . 28 00 
ippei boilers lo per oent. 

i: IKES, 

pel doz. net 1 20 up. 

B IZORS per doz. 

.. 4 00 18 00 



Elliots 

lUer B ft Co. '8 

linkers 

King Cutter 

Wade fe B 

Theile ,v Quack's 

Bauer's 

Bailer's Brantford 

■' tic 

Griffon Barber's Favorite ... 
Griffon No 55 

(Jriffnn Safet) Razors 

Griffon Stropping Machines. 



4 00 
7 50 

12 50 
3 60 
7 00 
6 oo 

10 00 



18 00 

11 00 
15 00 

10 00 

12 00 

12 hi 

11 00 
15 00 
10 7.". 

13 00 
13 50 
13 50 



REGIE l l I - 

Discount 40 per cent. 

l:l\ CTs ami BUBB8, 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

10 per cent 
lr<-in Bum, discount 55percent 

on 1 mil Rivets in lib carton 

|K.T 111 

Extras on Iron Rivet* in i-H> cartons, lo. 
per Hi 

- with usual proportion bum, 45 
pet cent discount. Cartons, lc. tier lb. 

extra, Del 

Burr* only, discount 30 and 10 per ent. 
ppered Rivets, j - 1 1 . 
cartons, lc per lb. 

linn BETS 
Canadian. dif cent 

I !• 

Steal.. 12 

i Manilla 14 

"British Manilla 12 

i, 3-16 inch and larger ... 16 

" 5-32 inch o 21 

i inch 22 

Kuiwi.. 1 " 15 

08 

l.atli Yarn, tingle o 11 

double 11| 
..1 cord, 48 f< • ' !■• t doz 

ii 60 

•■ 72 feet " 95 

i:i i 
,m.i 55 and l > * i» 
[Tory, discount 37} to to !•• 

BAD IRONS. 

\1 i polished i" i -■ ' 'i 70 

■ nickle-platcd, " 80 

MM' \Mi I.WII:l PAP1 ■ 

B ft A. sand, discount, 4n tod 5 pei cent. 
Emery, diw 

Gamet (Rurtonm. 5 to 10 per cent advance 
on list 



BAP BPOt IS 

Bronzed iron with hunks . . . .per 1,000 '•' 50 

s wis 

Hand. Disston's, discount 12$ percent. 
S ft D., discount 10 per cent 

i. l >!-.-,!■ H i s ...perfool o 35 o 55 
S. ,v i) . .lis on in 35 percent, "n Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, coinplctc each 75 2 75 

frame only 75 

sVsll III .11.11 K 

Sectional per 1001b. 2 50 2 75 

Solid " 1 75 2 00 

* Vs.ll I'iiIUi 

Per Hi 23 30 

■-w\ sets. per doz 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand s. is. No 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-Cut Sets, No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

si W.ES. 

Burrow, Stewart ft Milne— 

Imperial Standard, discount 10 per cent 
\v. - i i_r 1 1 Beams, discount 35 per cent 
( Ihampion Scales, discount 55 per rent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
Dominion, discount 55 per cent. 
Rii li.liiii. .lis-.. nut 55 per cent. 
Warrens new Standard, discount 40 pei oenl 
Champion, discount 55 percent. 
Weighbeams, discount 35 percent 

SCREW mm BBS 

Sargent's per do/.. 65 l iki 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors. 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 3-in style peril../ 6 60 

Common du.irs.2or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 3-in. style.... per doz. 6 80 

I ommon doors, 2or3 panel, in natural 

colors, oil finish per doz. 8 15 

4-in style 20.-. per dozen extra. 

SCREWS 

Wood. F ii . bright and steel, discount 87} 
and In per cent 

Wood, R H . bright, dis. 82} ami 1 ir oenl . 

" !■' ll . braes, dis. 80 and ID per oent. 

II H. ' .lis. 75 and In per cent 

F, H . bronze, dis. 75 per cent 

It. H . " dis. 70 percent. 

Drive Screws, 'lis. 87!, and 10 per cent. 

Hi mil. wood . per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set. ease hardened, dis 60 per cent. 
Srpiare t ap. dis 50 ami 5 per cent. 

Hexagon Cap. die. 45 per cent 

^. \ in i - 
Per doz. net 5 00 8 00 

81 VI II l: SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 
Battel I utlerj Co., full nickeled, discount 60 

and 21 per cent 
Baile) Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 67$ 

percent 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

Sl|.l\ l.l.s \Nli SPADES. 

i lanadi, 10 and 5 pei i 

SINKS 

steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent 

SN Ms 

German, dis ounl 25 i" 

Lock, Andrews 4 50 U 50 

SOLDERING icons 
1 1) lb p., II, .... 

'-'Hi or ni" " o 34 

ii- 

Iroii. No !'•.; per do/. 2 40 2 55 

No 194 " 3 25 3 40 

ito'eOai 

i'l) and I',, lei. diseoinit .'ill I., 52j per '• 111 

-I \ Mil Ii 
Plain, . and 12} per oenl Ofl n 

1 liHt 

Retinned, discount 75 pert ent, off revised list 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 25 3 50 

Plain 2 i«i 3 15 

Coopers', discount 45 percent* 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent 

Sim Ks AND IHEs. 
American discount 25 per cent 
STONE, 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindustan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " 13 

Axe " .... 15 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas " 1 50 

Water-of-Ayr " 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 2-in.,40to2001b.,perton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lh., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STOVEPIPES, 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 

7 inch... " " 7 50 

in wiei.ine STOVE POLISH 

No. 4, 3 doZ. in ease, net cash .... 4 80 

No 6, 3 do/, in ase. . " ... 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 and 12$ 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned. . 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 15 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in keys) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in do/ens only 80 

J weights 60 

Swedes out tacks, blued and tinned- 
fa bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk . .85, 12$ and 12!. 
brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12} 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpel lacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

( lopper nails 52$ 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glaziers points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. '.HI and 10 

" . " " bulk... 40 

Sin ie nails 60 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINKS 

English, ass skin per do/.. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

( iiesterinan's each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Bailey's, discount 25 per oent, 

TIIEHM.iMi; I MS 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 audio 

per cent. 

THAI'S (stei 1 I 

' ■ Hi "■ house, discount 25 per cent 

Game, II ft N . P s. ft W . 66 peroi nt 
Game, steel, 72J, 75 per oenl 
TROWELS 
Disston's, discount lOperci nl 

' i man per doz I 75 6 00 

s. ,v. I) , discount 35 per cent 

TWINES. 

Bag, ISussian per lb II 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 19 

4-ply 23 

Mattress per lb 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 



\ ISIS 

Wri S h ,t'» 13} 

Brook a 12J 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 \ 350 

. " „." No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 iki 

in LMELLBD » uie. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount ."ill per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent! discount 
M, 10 and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
SmOOth Steel Wire 

N "' ,°? g: .'." K '' * 2 5° 

J° 6c. extra. 

, 12c. " 

12 20c. " 

3 10c 

i .. 40c. 

}5 55c. " 

16 " 70c. " 

Add 60c tor coppering and *2 for tinning 
Extra net per 100 lb. Oiled wire 10c , 
spring wire $1 25, special hay baling wire 30c 
best steel «,,.- 75e ., bright soft drawn 15c 
charcoal (.Alia quality) si. 25. packed in casks 
or eases 16 .. bagging and papering 10c., 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
lie , 111 5 and lO-lli. bundles 25c , in lib 
hanks, ,50c, in i-lh. hanks 75c, in J-lb 
hanks 81, 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17 
*5-No. 18, $5.50 No. 19, $6- No. 20,86.65 
No 21. S7 No 22. S7.31 No. 23, S7.65 No 
24. S3 N... 25, 89 No 26, $9.50— No 27 
$10 No. 28, si 1 No. 29, $12 No. 30, $13- 
No.31, $14 No. 32, $15 -No. 33, $16 -No. 34, 
sl7. Extras net tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2 Nos. 26-31. $4 Nos. 32-34, s6. Coppered, 
5c— Oiling, 10c in 25-lb. bundles, 15c in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c in lib. hanks, 25c 

111 Wb. hanks, 38c. in {-lb. hanks, ,50c 
packed in casks or cases, 15c. bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Brass wire, discount 62} per cent, off the list. 
Copper wire, discount 62} percent, net cash 

30 days, f.o.b factory. 
Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5. 

83.70 to 83.90 Bros. 6, 7. 8. $3.15 to 83.35 

No. 9, $2.65 to $2.85 No. 10, $3.20 to $3.40 
No. 11, $3.25 10 $3.45 No. 12. 82.80 to 

83 No. 13, $3.90 to $4.10 No. 14. $3.75 to 
No. 15, 84.30 No. 16. $4.30. Base 

sizes. Nos. 6 to 0, $2.27$ f.o.b. CJeveland. In 

carlots 12}c, less. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand. No 17, 

84.65; No. 18. $2:90; No. 19, $2.60. Hollow 

6 strand, No 17, $4.30; No. 18. $2.70; No 

19, $2.35; No. 20, .$2.30, f.o.b. Hamilton, 

Toronto, Montreal 

Willi: FENCING. 

Galvanized, barb 2 90 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 90 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 67$ in 
less than carlols, and 82 55 in carlots. 
WISE 11. 1 it II. 

Painted Screen, per 100 so. ft., net.. 1 40 
Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days 

W \STE COTTON 

I "Ion d per Hi. 06 

While " 08 

" III N. ties. 
Acme, discount 35 to 37} per cent 
Agricultural, discount till percent 
< He s 1 lenuine, discount 2(1 to 25 per cenl 
Towers' Engineer each 2 00 700 

S peril../ 5 80 6 00 

G. & K.'s Pine " .... 3 40 

I'.urreU s Pipe each ... 3 00 

Poek.t per doz. 25 2 90 

W p. I N . . 1 . 1 : s 

Leader per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian. . . " 24 00 

Royal American " 24 00 

Sampson " 24 00 

Ti 1 mi , 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days 

WROt'llHT IRON WASHEHS 

Canadian make, discount 40 per cent 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street . Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLE8 D. PHILLIPS, 

Kiulyn Engineering Works, 
Nkwi-okt, Hon., England. 



Cables- 
Machinery," Newport. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 



Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS. CANADA. 



Manufacturers of 



FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 
ELECTRO PLATE. . . . 

Aak for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32 Canada Life Bldg . MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS -" C " Brand Horse- Nails 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRAS8ITE" GOODS — Oonn Castor Co. 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Always 
ask for 



"BAILEY" BRAND CUTLERY 



FULLY WARRANTED 



5- 
I s 



Complete Lines In 

Shears, Scissors, Razors, 

and Butcher Knives. 




<■+ -1 

o « 

<* -I 



BAILEY GUTLERY GO. 

BRANTFORD, CANADA. Limited 



CHAS. P. CLARK, President. 



JAHHIJ CHITTENDEN. Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, 81,500,000. Office! Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices: Nob. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRAD8TREET COMPANY gather* Information that reflects the financial condition and the 
controlling ctrcniunuiucesor every seeker of mercantile credit. Its buslnens may be defined as of the merchants, 
by ihe merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulKUtlng information, no effort Is spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify its claim as an authority on all matter* 
affecting commercial afialro and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
fur ilahes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
4UEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPKO. MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING. G«n. Man, Western Canada, Toronto, 









"The Year has gone— let it go ! M 

&f)e Old 7$eav 

with all its happiness and sadness, its fulfilments and disappointments 
its gains and its losses, is gone. 

XLty Mew Jgeav 

fraught with limitless possibilities, hopes and 
ambitions, is at hand. 



hopes 



May iour coming year make your possibilities actual facts ; may joui 
and your ambitions be realized ; may health and happiness be yours, and 
may yoa appreciate, as never before, the trade-getting qualities and personal 
service of 



(( 



CROWN HURON" RANGES. 



THE WESTERN FOUNDRY CO., 

Limited 

WINGIHH, ONT. 



'' Quality First and Always 




y ^44444444da4A444444AA4r444^4^^d44A444i 







Est. 1868 



Inc. 1886. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve - g — »- Medals 



i! 
!! 
!! 



!! 
i! 




Awarded 
By JURORS * 

International Expositions i 
Special Prize !j 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 J 




PATENT INTERLOCKING 

RUBBER TILING. 

The most perfect floor covering for Hotels, 
Cafes, Business Offices, Banks, Court Rooms, 
Churches, Hospitals, Vestibules, Halls, Billiard 
and- Smoking Rooms, Lavatories and Bath Rooms. 

NOISELESS NON -SLIPPERY 

WATERPROOF SANITARY 

Carefully selected range of soft, beautiful 
colors affording ample scope for combinations in 
harmony with surroundings. 

Write for Prices and Particulars 



Sole Canadian Manufacturers 



The Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfc. Co. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
45-47-49 West Front St. 



TORONTO, 



Factories 1 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



i 



CANADA. V 



"Alligator" 
Brand Gold Leaf 



We have now in stock : 

Gold Leaf, 
Silver Leaf, 
Schlag Me-ta 



I. 



LIMITED 



B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO, 

53 St. Sulpice Street, 

MONTREAL. 



VARNISHES *hd JAPANS 

McCASKILL, DOUGALL & CO. 



Manufacturers 



MONTREAL 




I 



Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Wont lurn white from the effects of water and sun. 

Standard Piano, Fnrnitnre and Decorative Varnisbes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and Varnishes 
Architectural Varnishes 



OFFICES 



161 Summer St., 

BOSTON, Mass., U.S.A. 



30 St. John St., 

MONTREAL 



,1 



Neither Fictitiouily Named Nor 
Exorbitant, 



GctLANGWELl'S BABBIT, 



MONTREAL. 



QJg 



CP^ABIA^ 



«5^ 




R D W A R 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada 



VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 10, 1903. 



NO. 2 



%€ B J*$? 






Arrow WingedShoe I&5. Works 

y . TRADE MARKS REC'D 



NSt 



SKATES 



•J 



v^ r* 



For Sal* by Loading Wholesale Nardwara Houses. 



jLliXIl. 




gfTTTTT^t 



LTSdOiTTJ QflLYfliNIZCD 
IRONS. 



"QLtfN'S ntAD"~the best in the 
world for work and wear. 



" Mill? DC LIS"— equal »o, or belter 
than, any brand but "Queen's Mead." 

Every sheet of both brands fully guaranteed. 



JOHN LTSAGHT. Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENQ. Managers Canadian Branch. 



CANADA 
fUUHA OE LIS. 





ti 



Safford " Radiators 



Manufactured for Heating all 
classes of Buildings by Hot 
Water or Steam. Made in 
different heights, beautiful de- 
signs. Plain or Ornamental. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office and Works: DUFFERIN ST. ' TORONTO, CAN. 




RICE LEWIS & SON 



Cor King and Victoria Streets, 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



SAMUEL, SONS £> BENJAMIN, 



London and Liverpool, England. 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington St. West, ^TORONTO, ONT. 

We carry in stock a full line of the following goods: 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard. 
Rods and Tubes. 

Canada Plates. 

Copper — Bar and Ingot. 
Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 

Copperine and Babbitt. 

Cotton Waste. 

Crucibles. 

Eave Trough — Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 
Galvanized, "Gordon Crown." 
Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 

Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 

Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 

Lead Pipe. 

Solder— Half and Half and Standard. 

Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat. 

Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 

Tin— Bar. Ingot, "L & F." and Straits. 

Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 

Zinc — Sheets and Block. 



INQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturer! of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM. ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



GARDEN 
HOSE 



We solicit your enquiries lor 
samples and prices for next season. 

Our line is complete, embracing 
the old lines with some new ones. 

All brands made with our Patent 
SeamleSS Tube to stand city pres- 



sures. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 

Hanufacturers of Rubber Goods, 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



Lightning, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 






' .i^w--^ 



ARE 



Well Advertised. 
In Demand. 
Easily Sold. 
Satisfactory in Use. 
Of Known Reputation. 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops. 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers. 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free. 



EXCEL IN 



Easy Running. 
Quick Freezing. 
Economy. 
Convenience. 
Practical Results. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phi,ad S a ' Pa - 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



See! You Don't Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 



G 








Nol£ 





WAIKI k . 

rr.nwN Lti rrn 



No.17 



rWALXCflSCHIVfRSAL 1 
J bill PULLINC- _J 



.'.0.16 



Walker's Self=Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Wood Handles. 
EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Several Imitations on the market, but none as good. 
Mfrd. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 




* »S<fTorrfo *np Sdfte- 
pnpte 0as^.'' 

X tuzvertisemetzt 

Y|eCOr^fD, 
Tof^orJ-ro 

u/<W bring you. 
tertdcrsfr<?m t/<. 
»>Vj *, J, &<st contractors 



\ 




WIRE ROPE 



Wire Rope. 



OF. 



All Kinds and Sizes 

AND FOR 

All Purposes. 

PRICES RIGHT. PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 

The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 




Screen Door Hardware. 



NON-HOLDBACK) 



(HOLD-BACK) 



Made of 
High-Grade 

Steel 
Spring 

Wife 
and in 
Various 
Finishes. 




Spring 
Hinges 

Strong 

and 

Handsomely 

Finished. 




Large 

STOCK 

Prompt 

SHIPMENTS. 



8TAR COIL 
DOOR 8PRING, 
Also the OEM. 



COLUMBIA 

Single and Double Acting. 



ACORN. 



TORREY ROD 
DOOR SPRING. 



FOR PRICES WRITE: 



The Columbian Hardware Co., Makers, Cleveland, onio. 

j— — ■ -^ Lamplough & McNaughton 



^<~> 



GEM WIRE DOOR PULL. 



CANADIAN SALES AGENTS, 

9 De Bresoles Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



[f your order i-> limited 

to but one make of 

Clippers - 

Specify 



HORSE CLIPPERS 



J if v 

♦ lei 

■ 




Wewmarket 
The d 

Machi 



Power Clipper, 28-in. drive wheel, with speed of 2.800 cuts per minute. 6-tt. flexible shaft. 
riv,- wheel, middle bracket and shaft can be swung so as to reach any part of the horse, 
ne-cut cogs made of Sheffield cast steel. 



20th Century Power Clipper, suspends from ceiling, has a positive gear drive, steel flexible shaft, 
highest-grade knives. The adjustable rope suspension permits easy access to all parts of the horse. 
Runs easy and cuts fast. 



Newmarket Power Clipper. 



TORONTO, 

87 YORK ST. 



QUOTE LOW 



Lewis Bros. & Co. 

WHOLESALE HARDWARE. 

eVAddseaeJ] oomnnuilcatloM to MONTREAL. 



OTTAWA, 

54 QUEEN ST. 



SNIP QIKK 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RE-ACTING WASHER 




Tin- quickest acting, readiest selling, and most generally satisfactory Rotary Washing 
ne on the market 

Theonl] regret your customers will have after buying one of these excellent machines 
is that they ili'l not know about ii sooner. 

They require them you should stock them— we can supply them. Order early. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., 

Limited 

HAMILTON. 

W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal, Eastern Agents. 




The P. R. Gumming Manufacturing Co., 




no. aa. 

No. 33 double blade) is similar in construction and finish. 



LIMITED. 



Something New ! 

THIS is an entirely new style of 
mincing knife of our own design. 
The shank is a flat tinned steel band, 
drawn tightly into a groove encircling 
the handle, the blade being riveted be- 
tween the ends. This construction 
does away with any hole in the handle, 
which consequently cannot split or 
come loose. The handle itself is stained 
and shellacked, the whole making the 
neatest and strongest mincing knife 
ever put on the market. 



MADE ONLY BY 



The P. R. Cumming Manufacturing Co., Limited, Clarksburg, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BENCH 
DRILLS 





No. 10. 
Capacity from Oto < 2 -in. —Changeable Speed. 

These Drills are furnished complete with 
Three-Jawed Chuck. They have Cut Gears and 
Adjustable Tables. 

We furnish Special Short Drills, Vises and 
other Attachments. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST. 



fTP KJV No. 8. 

Capacity from Oto \-in. 




No. 11. 
Automatic Feed. 



G00DELL-PRATT COMPANY, 

Greenfield, Mass., U.S.A. 



Decatur, Bull & CO., Montreal, Resident Representatives. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 



SHEFFIELD, 
ENGLAND. 




H R S &C° 

TIN PLATES: 

"Rogers" Cokes. 

" H. R. S. & Co." Charcoals. 

and all other grade-. 

CANADA PLATES: 
"II. R. S. & Co.," "Tyrch." 

and other brands. 
Canadian Office : 

6 ST. SACRAMENT ST., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MAM'KACTTRERS OF 

TINWARE AND UN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
Jacketed Oil Cans, 

Baking Powder Cans. 
Lard Palls, Etc. 

JAS. A. McGOLPIN 

156-162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



Buy the Best. 



«6£rw 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clotbes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealer 



THE MOST COMPLETE STOCK 



Brass a nd Copper 



in Sheets, Tubes, Wire and Rod. 



Service Right, 
Quality Right, Prices Right 



WATERBURY BRASS GO. 



122 to 130 Centre St., 



New York City. 



Always have our classified Stork 
List before you. 

YOURS FOR THE ASKING. 



THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited. 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan - American Exposition. 




MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

s Ja s n*. l la ROPE, ,; ath H Y p a T'? hin H g r, Y t a h rn, n id6 BINDER TWINE 

1 * Cord, Pulp Cord, Clothes Lines _____ __ «« «■_________ 

Transmission Rope a Specialty. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manil 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

•_•> Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

wm b. stewart, MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel. 94 27 Front St., West. Toronto. 






¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 




our 



E wish 
numerous cus- 
t om ers and 
friends a Bright 
and Prosperous 
New Year, and 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

Have You Received Our Calendar? T 



p that they may sell still more 

Pennoline 

the king of illuminating oils, in 1903 than in the past. 

See market quotations for price list of our 
several leading brands. 



The Union Petroleum Go., 



¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

¥ 

Vancouver, Winnipeg, Montreal, St. John. ^ 



TORONTO 



Branches 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Rn DV A CC P f*f\ port talbot, south wales, 
. D. DTMOO Ot UU.y GREAT BRITAIN. 

Largest MAKERS OF 

BEST SIEMENS STAMPING ENAMELLING 

BLACK PLATES, 

CIRCLES. RECTANGLES, I 

MAKERS of all descriptions of STEEL SHEETS. 

Brands SKER, and SKER BEST." 

Sole Canadian Export Agents, 

ROBERT CROOKS & CO., Botolph House, 10, Eastcheap, LONDON, E.C. 



Cable addrens : "CROLLO," LONDON. 



IT PAYS TO INVEST 



IN OUR ORNAMENTAL 



Office Railings, Fences, Grills, 
Fire Dogs, Etc. 



yss&i&SSsi 




Because they arc 



( Inexpensive 
) Relr 



iable 



I Ormairiri^r-i^a I 



Non-Tarnisha ble. 



Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 

Mead Office: TORONTO, ONT. 

DWi l : l < l "II [( I - 
Monti Winnipeg, Halifax CX ilaod 



The Fairbanks Comfranij 




Recognizing a demand for 
a cheaper grade of Scales 
than "The Standard" 
for domestic and farm use 
we offer 

THE "CROWN tVEN-BALANCE. 
' THE RICHELIEU" ONION SCALE. 
■fit DOMINION" PLATFORM SCALE. 

These styles are well 
finished and are excellent 
Scales. 

Write for Catalogues 
and Price*. 



Till: FAIRBANKS COMPANY, M0N V T A R N E C A L UVER . 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



I* Mark 



AUER UGHT MANTLES 

\ LONGEST LIFE $ BRIGHTEST I 



.Our. 
Mark 



A Statement of Facts. 



m 



We make the strongest mantles. 
Our mantles gives the most light. 
We use the purest and most costly 

chemicals. 
We anneal our mantles with 

pressure gas. 
Our mantles won't shrink or fray 

out. 
Our trade mark A is on the 

be^t mantles. /i__ 
We make mantles with any private mark on 
them, your own name if you desire. 

WE make: 



IA1 



3jrf 



Coal Gas Mantles. 
Oil Gas Mantles. 
High-Pressure Mantles. 



Coal Oil Mantles. 
Gasolene Mantles. 
Acetylene Mantles. 



Ill single, double or triple weave. 

Lowest prices on Mantles, Shades, 
Chimneys and Sundries. 

Write us if you are interested. 

AUER L!GKT CO., - - MONTREAL 




r*>~L 




'S 



a 




PATENTED 1874. 



The King of 
Centre-Adjustment 

Clippers 

still remains 

unsurpassed 

after a run of nearly 

THIRTY YEARS 




|" Clipper. 



The Improved 

B, PATTERN 
" NEWMARKET " 

may now be obtained 
from all jobbers. 

Detachable Plates. 

Improved Cap with 
Long Bearing. 

Rigidity and Easy 
Running. 

Accurately Machined 
and Perfeotly Fitted. 

All Parts Interchangeable. 



MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



BURMAN & SONS, LIMITED 

BIRMINGHAM, E NGLAND 



Supplies for the Maple Syrup Season. 




Sap Buckets . . . 

-EXTRA DEEP AND STRAIGHT. 
—THREE SIZES. 

They possess many advantages over the ordinary 
flaring Buckets — being small in diameter they do not 
catch the rain or snow, and as they are very deep, 
they hang perpendicularly, and consequently will 
not overflow until full. 

— Covers supplied if required. 

— They nest close for shipping or storing. 

We can also supply the ordinary Flaring or 
Western Sap Pails. 



E. T. Sap Spouts. 

MADE OF RETINNED STEEL-STRONO AND DURABLE. 

Only require a ^-in. hole in tree. 

It does not cover the inside surface of the hole ; therefore 

larger amount of sap is obtained. 

Packed in card-board boxes. 




Maple Leaf 

Sap Spouts. 




Made in Bronzed Steel. 

Require a J^-in. hole. 

Has a shoulder which prevents it being 
driven in too far. 

The hole in the tree is not exposed to wind 
and snow ; consequently, sap will flow longer. 

Packed in card-board boxes. 




Syrup Cans, round or square. 

Plain or decorated. Made in # , "4, and i gallon sizes. 

Either Wine or Imperial Measure. 

A full stock carried in all lines ; orders shipped promptly. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 



TORONTO, CANADA. 





&g&iK ! ?^^ 





ETAL 









VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 10, 1903 



NO. 2 



President : 

JOHN BAYNB MacLBAN, 

Montreal. 

rhe MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 



Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal - 
Toronto 
London, Eng. 
Manchester, Eng. 
Winnipeg 
Vancouver, B.C. 
St. John, N.B. - 
New York 



- 232 McGill Street. 
Telephone 1255. 

io Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702 

iog Fleet Street, E.C. 

W. H, Miln. 

- 18 St. Ann Street. 
H. S. Ashburner. 

- Western Canada Block. 

J.J. Roberts. 

Flack Block. 

J. A. Macdonald. 

No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

Room 802 New York Life Bldg. 



Subscription, Canada and United States, S2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 
• Cable Address j J*^ j^E 

TO INTERVIEW THE GOVERNMENT. 

BRITISH-COLUMBIAN men inter- 
ested in lead raining are coramen* 
cing to take decisive steps toward ob- 
taining from the Canadian Govemmenl 
some protection for the industry of their 
Province. Messrs. John L. Retallack, 
chairman of the Load and Silver Miners' 
Association, li. O. Buchanan, representing 
die Kootena) Boards of Trade, and Geo. 
I). Potior and George Alexander, of the 
Lead Miners' Committee, are on their wa) 
to interview the paint manufacturers and 
other large consumers of load in Ontario, 
Quebec and the Eastern Provinces, with a 



view to securing their interest, and, per- 
haps, co-operation in the project. The) 
will moot in Montreal on January 20. 
Afterwards thej will wait o<\ the Dominion 
Government, and petition them to make 
some change in the tariff which will bene- 
lit the British-Columbian lead-mining 
industry. An increase in the dut) on p\g 
load is, of course, the primary object. 

These Western gentlemen are likely to 
moot with a favorable reception from most 
manufacturers in the oast. The subject 
of load mining has come up before them 
in a casual way more than once recently, 
and a general feeling ofsympath) with 
those engaged in thai industry in the 
Pacific Province seems to be prevalent. 
Whether their suggestions will moot with 
a like response from members of the 
Government is another question. 

The duty on piir load from the United 
States is now l"> per cent., and on white 
and rod load, 5 por cent. The disposition, 
however, of influential supporters of the 
present Government is to regard all such 
proposed legislation on behalf of so com- 
parative!) small an industry as is load 
'mining in Canada as merely a sort ot' 
bonus system b) which certain promoters 
are aided by public mone) to keep in 
operation a business that could not pos- 
sibly be put on a paying basis. This senti- 
ment has already been given utterance to 
h\ some strong friends o( (he party in 
power in regard to the lead-mining in- 
dustn ; and when opposition is announced 
at this earl) stage we cannot export an 
e.ts\ path for the British-Columbian min- 
ing men. 



SPORTING GOODS TRADE. 

HARDWAREMEN should do the bulk 
of the sporting goods trade of then 
towns. So mam of these lines are 

handled exclusive!) by the hardware trade 

that it would be oas\ to make sporting 
goods a feature, and so secure a thorough 
connection with all clubs and organiza- 
tions, as well as private parties, using 
these goods, either indoors or in the open. 

To do this most successfully, a study of 
the trade should he made, either h) the 
proprietor or b) some 1 lerk who is old 
enough and who has sufficient tacl to look 
after this line. Catalogues should he 
secured from the leading houses, ;uid 
these should he examined from cover to 
cover careful!) and often. Most lines 
should be stocked, but where this i- not 
practical, it will be found eas) in mam 
eases to sell direct from the catalogue. 

In this connection some hardwaremen 
make the mistake of using loo promin- 
ently the catalogues of houses which sell 
by mail older direct to users of sporting 
goods, either to clubs or private indivi- 
duals. While it ma) be well to have 
catalogues from such houses, it would be 
wise to patronize them as little as possible. 
It would rather be good policy to make 
the claim that, having a connection with 
the leading manufacturers and jobbing 
houses, you are in a hotter position to sup- 
ply local clubs or persons than am outside 
retailer or mail-order house would be. 
This claim, combined with personal 
acquaintance and businesslike methods, 
should enable the local trade to keep the 
mail-order houses almost entirely out of 
the field. The sporting u;oods trade is 
profitable, and well worth the stud) and 
woi k[ne< «. — .11 \ to obtain it. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADA'S COMMERCIAL POSITION. 



Till-! new year in Canada starts its 
career under most favorable con- 
ditions. Without being charged with ex- 
ration u r believe we can safel) saj 
tint at i!k- beginning of no previous year 
in tin- histor) of tin- count rv have the con- 
ditions been, on the whole, so promising. 

The besl criterion of a country's position 
is not its territorial expansion, or the 
number of square miles that are within it> 
boundaries. 

It is the measure of its commercial pros- 
perity and the possibilities of it-- natural 
resources that are the best indications. 
And it is herein that lies the strength ot 
Canada's position to-day. 

While there has been a marked develop- 
ment in the manufacturing industries of 
Canada during the last few years, agricul- 
ture is the foundation of her industrial life. 
And in this respect the conditions are 
gratifying indeed. In Manitoba, in the 
Northwest Territories and in New Ontario, 
-aw a development of agricultural 
interests not only in excess of expectations, 
hut far and beyond the record of any 
previous year. 

Manitoba and the North west Territories 
yielded 125,000,000 bushels of grain, of 
which nearly 68,000,000 bushels were 
wheat. 

In Manitoba the yield of wheat has in- 
creased nearl) 1,000 per cent, in 10 years, 
while the aggregate value of the grain, 
the root-, the live stock and the dairy pro- 
ducts of the Province in 1902 is estimated 
at nearly $44,400,000. For a population 
of a little over 500,000 this is a most 
creditable showing. And during an inter- 
view a few weeks ago, cx-1'remicr tiieen- 
way ventured the opinion that 1903 would 
witness an increase of ■>:> percent, in the 
crop production of Manitoba and KM) per 
cent, in that of the Northwest Territories. 
A short time ago the United Stales Consul 
al Winnipeg, m a report submitted to 
Washington, declared that " three-fourths 
of the wheat lands of North America lie- 
north of the boundary line." 

According to an official statement issued 
at Ottawa a few weeks ago, 56,000 people 
from outside countries settled in Manitoba 



and the Northwest during ll months end- 
ing \ov ember last. And about 31,500 of 
these weii' from the United Slates. This 
year everything points to a still greater 

influx, especially from the United States. 
The old Province of Ontario more than 
sustained its reputation last year for the 
varietv and wealth of its agricultural pro- 
ducts, producing 166,861,653 bush, ol 
grain, againsl 139,678,398 bush, in L901. 
Of the total, 26,121,693 bush, were wheat 
and IOC, 13 I , 139 hush, were oats. 

A well-founded belief obtains in the 
world that nations to be commercially im- 
portant must have a well-developed iron 
industry. Without discussing the sound- 
ness of this premise, it is a fact beyond 
dispute that 1902 witnessed a marked 
development of the iron and steel industry 
in this country. In fact, in every branch 
of the manufacturing industry, Canada 
made substantial strides during the year 
which has just departed. 

The export trade in manufactured goods 
ncreased by over $3,000,000 last year, 
while the export trade of the country, in 
merchandise generally, grew from $194,- 
509,143 in 1901, to $209,970,864 in 1902. 

Our foreign trade is now well on the 
way to the half billion mark, being $423,- 
910,444, of which $211,640,286 were ex- 
ports and $212,270,158 imports. Our 
export trade alone is now about $7,000,- 
000 larger than the imports and exports 
combined of 13 years ago. According to 
the latest returns for the present fiscal 
vear, the foreign trade of the country for 
L903 bids fair to be much larger than that 
of 19ti2, both in regard to exports and 
imports. 

Hut the foreign trade of a country is not 
always the best indication of its prosperity 
Frequently the export trade, for example, 
may be stimulated by the lack of demand 
at home, as it was during I he depression 
in the United States a few years ago. Bui 
that the export trade of Canada is not 
forced bv any such influence is evident 
from the difficulty manufacturers and 
others are experiencing in supplying the 
demand of the home market. 

That, however, is not the only test. 
There is the corroborative evidence of the 



railwav earnings and the bank clearings, 
both of which show large increases over 
1 he previous year. 

Five or six years ago it was fell that 
Canada was building railways faster than 
she required them. But what are the con- 
ditions to-day? Simply that the industrial 
development of the country has far out- 
stripped its transportation facilities. And 
in every part of the country -in the other 
portions as well as in the Great West 
there is an absolute blockade. If by some 
mysterious agency it were possible to sud- 
denly double the transportation facilities 
of the railways, there would be no more 
than a sufficiency for to-day's requirements! 
And new lines are being built and old ones 
double-tracked and otherwise being equip- 
ped to meet the actual requirements of the 
commercial demands of the country. 

Canada enters upon 190.3 with even 
brighter prospects before her than when 
she entered 1902. And certainly in no 
country are the commercial prospects 
more assuring. 



When a merchant hasn't time to stop 
and think, it is evident his business is 
running away with him. 



THE CANADIAN CEMENT INDUSTRY. 

A TORONTO daily newspaper points 
out that while the consumption of 
cement in Canada last vear was but 
2,200,000 barrels, it is estimated that 
3,500,000 barrels per year will be pro- 
duced before long. Then it adds: " The 
pessimists believe that things in this line 
will be something like what they a're in 
Germany; where at present the cement 
market is much congested, and the pro- 
duel is being sold at below the cost of 
manufacture, producing a condition of in- 
dustrial distress that is widely felt through- 
out the Fatherland." 

It would be interesting to learn who the 1 
pessimists are, and why they are so timid 
as lo the future of the cement industry in 
this country. We are afraid the pessi- 
mists referred to are some ol the "lambs" 
of speculative circles who are looking for 
a good chance to "get in on the ground 
floor" on some gilt-edged investment, but 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MK1A1. 



1! 



who -in too ignorant .it i In real condition* 
to knovt how to invest theii money. 

Those who are intimate with the cemenl 
trade are not likel) to be frightened bj the 
stock market reports Poi the benefit >>i 
the timid who ma) be seeking the truth 
w e would refei them to the reporl ol the 
Ontario Bureau of Mines foi L902i some 
extracts from which m- reproduce below : 
"The employment of cemenl has ol late 
years been extending in .1 multitude ol 
directions, and it has been found capable 
of satisfactorily replacing not onlj da) pro- 
ducts and stone, bul also wood and iron 
foi m.m\ purposes. In almost ever} 
variet) of publii works, such a* canals, 
dams, breakwaters, piers, bridges, con- 
duits, etc., cement plays a highly import- 
am part, and in the composition of build- 
ings it is do longer restricted to founda- 
tions or floors, but finds much favor with 
architects, especially in large modern steel 
and iron structures, as a substance for em- 
bedding beams and girders to give addi- 
tional strength, prevent oxidation, and 
guard against the destructive effects of 
warping in rase of fire. * * * For 
roofing 1 iK's, sewer pipes, culverts, for 
decorative and art purposes, for the manu- 
facture of hollow building blocks to take 
the place of brick or stone, for the founda- 
tion of hank barns and tor a hundred 
other uses cement is rapidly winning iis 

way. " 

What is the result of this remarkable 
development? In 1891 the total produc- 
tion of cemenl in Ontario was but i s .i'll 
barrels ; in 1901 it bad risen to 189.28A 
barrels; official figures tor 1902 are not 
yet given, but our contemporary places the 

production in the Dominion at 1,400, 

barrels (in all probability an excessive 
figure). Vet, and in spite of the big im- 
portation, prices were well maintained all 
year. 

It is sale to s.i\ thai the Canadian 

cement industn has just started on an era 
of expansion that is not likel) to suffer 
from overproduction lor a tew years yet, 
even it" the many companies proposed 
come into active industrial being. The 
business ma) be overdone, bul it will not 
lie lor a few years yet, 



CIRCULARS A WASTE OF MONEY. 
'T'Mlk shrewdest and most experienced 
1 advertisers the world ovei havi de- 
cided against the use of the circulai as a 
profitable advertising medium. Marshall 
Field, ot Chicago, probahl) the most sin - 
eesstul merchant in the world, ami the 
most successful advertiser, says : "One 
advertisement in one i;ood papei is worth 
a hundred circulars and costs fat less." 

"some inexperienced advertisers still 
mak« use of the circulai In which to con- 
vey their message to the buying publii In 
placing their orders for, say, 2, circu- 
lars, the) onl) have in their mind the first 
cost of printing, which ma) he som 
or perhaps $8, foi the cheapest that an) 
good house would care to use. Generally 

they COSl many times this figure lor some- 
thing special to attract attention. They 
do not at the linn.' consider the COSl of the 
envelopes and the addressing of the same, 
or the cosi of postage, which is the largest 

item of all. 

Say a business firm places an ordei foi 
2,000 circulars costing $8. The envelopes 

are worth $1.50 per I, , or $3 for 2, 

the cosi of addressing them is worth $2 

per I, or Si for 2,000. If a le. stamp 

be used it means Sjo for Stamps, and the 

recipient knowing it to be a circular, from 
the fait that there is only a le. stamp on 
the envelope, often casts it in the waste 
basket unopened. On the other hand, if 
a 2c. stamp on each envelope be used, the 
COSl of postage is $40, this added to the 
COSl of the printing, the COSl ol" envelopes 
Etnd addressing of same, brings the total 
eost of sending out 2,000 circulars just 

What impression does a circular make 
on the manager of a lartre business house, 
who may, perhaps, receive a do/en or so 
in his morning mail/ Hi- may give each 
a passing glance, or if he should happen 
to be busy he mav east them all In the 
waste basket. He never thinks of put tint; 
a circular on file for reference. At the 
best he may read it over, then go and 
attend to his many other duties without 
ever giving it a thought afterwards. 

Ninety-nine times out of a hundred this 
is the way the circular is treated. Hut if a 
merchant be a retailer and desire to reach 
the mnnv and places his advertisement in 
the dailv newspaper it will not eost him 
anything like $55, and he will reach not 
only 2,000 readers, but perhaps jo.immi or 
30,000 readers. 

If the meri bant be a wholesaler, manu- 
facturer or jobber, and he places his mes- 
sage in a reputable bona-fide trade journal, 
he K.tn for a great deal less than $ 



I III ee, Ms, It Ml I III: - 

than he « ould h\ hi cin ul.u 

Then then h still anoihei phase to Hi. 

question Th< > in ul.u looks ' heap 

belittles the Standing of a jmmhI i.hahl. 

house On the olhei hand, an 

mint well written and well set up ap| 

ing in a publication ol standing and 

know n mei it, . ai ries « ith it an ail "t 

Ink II. e anil respSCl w hii h no , u, ul.u, no 
mallei how t.islelullv il mav Iv gotten up, 

, an hope to . .11 I v . 

I . in ul.u is a baa k numbei todern 

advertising methods, and ^ood adverti 
have discarded its use as a relit ol back 
ai^es in ^ood advertising, as being more 
expensive and less effective. 

DEPARTMENTAL STORES AND 
NEWSPAPERS. 

C CONSIDERABLE comment has | 
/ caused in the trade bv the purchase 

of The Toronto Dailv News In Mr. I W. 

Flavelle, of The Win. Daviea Meat Pack- 
ing Co. Mr. Flavelle is the principal 
proprietor of The Robert Simpson Com- 
pany, o\m.' of the largest retail depart- 
mental stores in Canada, and also of about 
thirtv retail provision stores in Toronto 
and some outlying towns. 

The Control of a dailv newspaper by a 
departmental store proprietor who is a 
huge advertiser is not entirely new, even 
in Canada. Mr. Timothy Katon, of The 

1 Eaton Company, is, with sii William 
Mulock, Postmaster-General, the proprie- 
tor i^f The Toronto Dailv Star. In the 
United States quite a number of depart- 
mental store men are owners of or hold a 
lar^e interest in daily newspapers. 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., Boston, have a 
half interest in The Daily Globe of thai 
eilv. Wanamakei. Philadelphia, and 

M.ii shall Field, Chicago, each practical]) 

own a dailv paper. The Mohiean Com- 
pany, Which have a chain of retail si, .us, 
own dailv papers in New York. Boston 

and Washington. 

As it is good poliiv to follow the lead of 
successful men, no doubt others will do as 
Mr. Flavelle has done. Mr. Flavelle 
his business e.ueer in a retail general 

store with his mule, the late Mr. Dundas, 
M.I'., in Lindsay, aiW has gradually 
worked himself up, and lo-dav . though a 
young man, he is oiw of the wealthiest 
men in Canada He i- a man of uu- 

usuallv high character, and. though he 
has made man) enemies in the retail trade 
bv his competition, vet, all hold him in 

the highest respei I. The lattei mav also 
truthfully be said of his tu les in 

the newspaper venture. Mi. Willison and 

Mi c'oUiiilioun. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE CI.F. QUESTION — AN AUSTRALIAN VIEW. 



Al'STRAL VSIAN II \K1>\VAKK. 



TMK face meaning of this commercial 
formula is matter of common 
knowledge iu the business world, 
but i significance is not so well 

understood. Goods c.i.f. are goods sold 
at a price which covers insurance and 
freight to the port named. So much we 
all know. The questions arise, however, 
what, in such transactions, should be the 
character of the insurance effected, and 
when th<' seller's responsibility ceases and 
the purchaser's begins ? 

ntly a discussion took place in the 
columns of a Canadian contemporary on 
these points A firm bought " c. i. f. 
Mont i<al " from the agent of a British 
house certain goods, which arrived in a 
rusty and unsaleable condition. The con- 
Bignee held thai the goods should have 
been insured to uch loss, and cast 

the responsibility on the consignors. 
Their agent, on the other hand, main- 
tained that the contract only called for 
ordinary insurance, and that Ms firm was 
consequently not liable. The opinion of 
leading business and professional men was 
taken on the subject, and, while there 
was a difference of view as to the actual 
import of the term " c.i.f.." there was 
practical unanimity that the shippers in 
the case cited were not at fault. A "mem- 
ber of the bar," and an insurance ex- 
pert, agreed with several commercial men 
in this view. Tn the ordinary course, 
they maintained, the seller's responsibil- 
ity was at an end when he had covered 
the shipment with the kind and amount 
of insurance usually placed on goods of 
similar character. If the purchaser had 
not stipulated for a special policy cover- 
ing the loss complained of lie must put 
up with the consequences. At any rate. 
the matter was one between him and the 
underw liters. 

\ to the time when the risk passes 
from the one party to the other, a 
" wholesale grocer " thinks the seller 
" ought to lie " responsible until the 
goods are actually in the hands of the 
purchaser, but he firmly feels there is 
no hope of this position being legally 
maintained, and has had so much trouble 
with insurance «>-> " at thn other end " 
that, instead of buying c.i.f. he buys c. 
and f.. and ha the insurance looked after 
by a lo<al agent. "A prominent Grain 
merchant " says without any misgiving, 
that in all C.i.f. transactions " delivery 
under the contract takes place where the 
shipment i~ actually made and the in- 
voice rendered. A- -non a- the goods 

leave my hand- they are in possession of 

and because lie has Signed 

tie- contract, losses in tran-it. if there 

lie any. must I e borne bv him." 



We have been at pains to consult those 
qualified to speak on the subject bore, 
with a somewhat similar result. A legal 
practitioner says it is not quite clear 
when goods sold c.i.f. become the proper 
tj of the purchaser. The better opinion 
seems t<> be. he adds, however, that the 
seller's risk ends on shipment, and that 
for any damage sustained in transit the 
purchaser would have to recover from the 
insurance people concerned. Long experi- 
ence has convinced a leading hardware 
merchant that " the liability of the seller 
censes with the shipment of the goods 
and the transfer of the bill of lading (al- 
ways provided the same is perfectly 
clean) and insurance policy. The pur- 
chaser of a c.i.f. consignment is thus put 
in exactly the same position as if he had 
purchased f.o.h. at port of shipment, and 
I think this is looked upon as the recog- 
nized usage by most importers. Some of 
the selling houses make this quite clear 
in their contracts of sale by, ins&rtdngv a 
clause to this effect : ' Where goods sold 
c.i.f. are not bought by sellers f.o.b. at 
shipping port, the buyer's risk of condi- 
tion commences at works.' " Another gen- 
tleman of large and long hardware experi- 
ence says: "The custom of our trade, so far 
as T have any knowledge of it. is for the 
risk on c.i.f. purchases to be borne by the 
purchaser after shipment has been made. 
All the jute and oil business with Cal 
cut I a is done on this basis, and I have 
never heard of the exporting houses car- 
rying any risk after shipment. Messrs. 

■ ■ and — ; , who are agents for 

large Calcutta exporters, have had dis- 
putes with their customers on this verv 
subject, and in each instance. T believe, 
the settlement has been effected in ac- 
cordance with the views which T have 
expressed." Appealed to on the subject, 
one of the firms named makes the follow- 
ing: statement : ' The shipper receives 
payment usuatlv at the port of shipment 
bv drawing upon London under a bank 
letter of credit provided by the buyer. The 
latter is the owner of the goods as soon 
as the bill of lading is parted with by the 
shipper, irrespective of whether payment 
is as above or bv anv otber arrange 
merit. Should the p-oods lie drawn for. 
say, at 00 days' sipht. •"•on the buyer, 
and the buyer declines to accept, he can- 
not escape the costs tlie holder of the 
liill i- tmt to in realizing monevs to 
meet same '■ ' " '' ' from the goods 
and second from the buyer." 



Toronto, has been appointed traveller tor 
tlie company in the Central Ontario dis- 
trict to succeed VY. K. Bulmer, who repre- 
sented the company for several years. 
Mr. Raw son starts on the road next week-, 
and, as he is a progressive, energetic young 
man, he should receive a warm welcome, 
from the trade. 




Considerable thought has been given by 
The Dominion Coal Company to the 
building of a coke oven at Montreal to 
supply the city with the coal gas by-pro- 
duct. 

Sutherland & Spick, hardware mer- 
chants, of Dauphin, have secured tempo- 
rary quarters for their business after the 
recent fire, and next spring will erect a 
commodious new building. 

One of the best-known residents of 
North Sydney, N.3., W. H. Moore, died 
in the early morning of December 27. The 
deceased was a large shipowtier, and for 
many years carried on a large business at 
that place. 

E. McDougall, who has been on the 
travellers' staff of The Smart Manufac- 
turing Company for the past seven years, 
will now travel for The Canada Hardware 
Company, of Montreal. His district will 
be, from Cornwall, Ont., to Pictou, N.S. 

F. Rogers' coal and wood yard on 
Queen street west, Toronto, suffered dam- 
ages by fire to the extent of $300 on the 
3rd Lost. The prompt work of the fire- 
men prevented the fire from spreading to 
the large lumber piles in the adjacent 
yards. 

E. V. Tanner, perceiving the needs of 
our western country, has a feasable pro- 
position to manufacture straw fuel, and 
believes that he can supply inexpensive 
machines for the purpose. The straw will 
lie packed in somew hat I he shape of cool 
wood, and will make splendid fuel he 
claims. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



WILL COVER CENTRAL ONTARIO. 

E. W. Raw son, who has tor some 
years been in charge of the sales depart- 
ment of the McClary .Manufacturing Co., 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MKTAL 






CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

t< i rooLS. 

WM. T. WOOD & CO., m.mul.u- 
turers of fine qualit} i>e tools, 
Arlington, Mass., are Banding oul 
in the trade an illustrated catalogue of 
theii goods. This firm make ever) form 
oi ice tool imaginable), from ice cultivators, 
ploughs, breakers, etc. , to ice chisels, tongs 
and saws. The lines of tools carried b) this 
in in are complete, and anj merchant de- 
siring to lay in a store of ice tools will find 
nearly everything made in that line listed 
in this catalogue. Mention Hardw ire 
\m> Mbtai when writing. 

A CALENDAR i OR SIX CBN1 S, 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., 
Worcester, M.t^., upon receipt of six 
cents, will forward one oi theii fine calen- 
dars for 1903 to an} of oui readers who 
mention I Iardwarej vnd M i 

v i;i i Ul BR'S i vi ENDAR. 

Frs Martineau, hardware dealer, 1379- 
1385 St. Catherine street, Montreal, has 
issued a well designed and lithographed 
calendar for Unci. It is in French. The 
design represents the three branches of 
Mr. Martineau's business, hardware, wall 
papers and paints. 

ll.\\n\ kill RBN< I \\\l \l . 

S i n years ago The Dominion Brewery 
Co., Limited, Toronto, oi which Wm. 
Ross is manager, issued to their friends a 
vest-pocket reference annual. This year 
another of the series has been issued, and, 
like its predecessors, is replete with useful 
information on sporting events and records; 
rau-s oi postage, etc 

Till-: rWO FAMILIES. 

One oi the prettiest and most interesting 
little calendars of the year is that issued 
b) Carter Bros., retail hardware merchants, 
PictOrt, Out. The picture is from a paint- 
ing bj O. Water, and is entitled "Tile 
Two Families." The one family is a mare 
and her colt and the other a fox hound and 
her litter oi pups, with the two mothers in 
evident sympathy with each other. 

" what's up?" 

Rogers, Toronto Junction, is another 

retail hardware-man who is distributing to 
his customers a pretty and Striking calen- 
dar. The picture in this instance is also 
a reproduction in original colors oi a 
masterpiece, "What's Up?" and shows 

three handsome setteis in the fore- 
ground with a background of sh rub- 
ber} in autumn garb. Rogers' Hard- 
ware Store" is printed prominentl) on 

the face oi the calendar and in a corner 



Ifs Worth a Great Deal 

to he an lf|60l for 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

Nun arc then handling the betl paint thai can be mad. You are 
representing the largest paint-making concern in the world. \ on ar>- 
also sharing in the best paint selling methods and advertising. 

There is money and business reputation in the agency. 'The 
Company has built up the most successful paint business in the world 
on the quality of its products and by straightforward business methods. 

A stock of the Sherwin-Williams Paint on your shelves identifies 
you with the Company. The prestige of their success is yours. 

The high quality of our products, backed up by a direct syst. 
advertising in your behalf, brings only one result — a successful paint 
business for you — the largest in your locality. 

Write to-day for our "H 13" booklet. (lives our proposition in 
detail. 



£|7//£ Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK. BOSTON. SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY. 




is this businesslike phrase: "We either j„ eXCeedingl} simple lo operate. Write 
carry it in Stock, will get it for you, Or it ,| u . m f or t | u .j, catalogue and mention 
'Sn'l made." _ || » RD WARH ami Mi.iai . 



" ARK DRAM) " PAINT. 

The Francis-Frost Co., Toronto, manu- 
facturers oi " Ark Brand " paint have issued 
one of the finest calendars oi the year. The 
subject is a reproduction in well-blended 
colors oi Angelo Aspi's famed painting 
"Babette." It is mounted on a heavy 
pebbled white background, and is a most 
handsome work. 

LCH Ks. 

S. K. Slaymaker, Lancaster, Pa., has 
issued a handsome Catalogue oi his locks, 
which will be sent lo the trade on applica- 
tion. It is profusely illustrated, with good 
clear engravings oi the great variety oi 
locks and keys which the firm makes. 

The binding and printing are both oi the 

best. Alexander (iibb, Montreal, is the 
Canadian representative. 

DANA AND CO., CINCINNATI. 

The catalogue oi Dana & Co., Cincin- 
nati, oi their Peerless Iceland Freexers is 
a booklet handsomely primed and en- 
graved with cuts oi the various patterns 

of freezers made by this firm. One oi the 
advantages claimed for these freezers is 
theii few parts and one motion alone. Il 



NORTH BROS. MM.. CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

The North Bros. Mfg. Co. Philadelphia, 
have just issued a useful little illustrated 
catalogue of their ice cream freezers. In 
these freezers the patented automatic twin 
scrapers insure automatic, positive and 
continuous scraping of fro/en cream from 
the sides ol the can. The scrapers are 
hung on dasher so their lower ends rest 
on bottom of can, and the friction between 

ends of scrapers and can bottom, when in 

motion, moves the scrapers against side of 
can and holds (hem there positive!} and 

continuously. Two other special features 
are that the pails are made of cedar, with 
electric-welded wire hoops, which are 
guaranteed not to fall off or break, and 
the bottoms of the cans are drawn s 
which will not leak, break, or fall out oi 
body of can. This firm also manufacture 
large size and machine freezers tor hotels 
and restaurants. The last I the 

catalogue are filled with ac< 
sistin^ oi packing tubs nul 
breakers and chippers. Dealers handling 
these free/ei's will be furnished with cir- 
culars and dec' 1 of idvertising tree 
of charge. For catalogue, address North 
Mfg. v o.. Philadelphia. Pa. 



11 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



IDEAS IN GETTING TRADE. 

\ PROGRESSIVE merchant is ever 
actively searching for ideas on 
how to increase hi* business. The 
Saint Paul Trade recently favored its 
readers with a few ideas in this line, from 
which we reproduce the following : 

\ clever Ohio merchant succeeded in 
attracting a |?reat deal of attention to 
hi- store bj offering a prize to the j ■■ 
who would write the word* "Christinas 
Goods at Weber's" the greatest number of 
times upon the blank side of a postal 
card. It seems almost impossible, but the 
prize-winner succeeded in writing the sen- 
5,012 limes. The second prize con- 
tained the sentence 3,467 times, and was 
verj plain and readable. The winner was 
a 15-year-old boy, and the third prize 
given to a clergyman. It" the prizes 
given in thi> c, .ntest are attractive en- 
ough and the right kind of advertising is 
done, we see ao reason why it should not 
prove very profitable to the merchant 
using it. 

Here is an idea that is not altogether 
new, but is always effective. Fit up a 
lady's boudoir as it would be after " my 
lady's shopping tour. A wrap should be 
thrown carelessly over the back of a 
chair, one glove on the chair and another 
on the lloor. On the bed and on the 
floor should be several packages, and "my 
lady" herself should be standing in front 
of the dresser removing her hat. Don't 
spoil this effect by trying to exhibit goods 
but indicate that the lady has been to 
your store to do her shopping by having 
all the packages wrapped in your printed 
paper. 

This little plan may be used to good 
effect in small towns. Select from your 
Stock a variety of articles, ranging in 
from S to 14 cents. Arrange these 
attractively on a table well to the front 
of your stoic, and in a box, close at 
hand, have several hundred envelopes, in 
each of which is a number, 5, 10 or 15. 
On a card explain to your trade that the 
things on the table are not for sale, that 
the envelopes in the box are for sale at 
a price not exceeding: 15 cents. 'I lien ex- 
plain that the purchaser of an envelope 
is entitled to his choice of anything on 
the table for the price indicated on the 
ticket inside of the envelope. Some of 
these tickets are for 15 cents, some for 
10 cents, and a few of them for 5 cents. 
N,.n can proportion them SO as not to 
have the numbers exceed the cost of the 
articles on the table, but be sure to have 
enough 5-cenl card- in the envelopes to 
make the drawing interesting. You may. 
if von so choose, have one prize of a large 
doll or anything which i- especially ap- 
propriate for that purpose, but, of o 
the ticket entitling the purchaser to the 
doll will not be put among the envelopes 

until they are nearly sold. 



WORTH KNOWING. 



There is not a revolver mailr that 
po s sesses safety features equal to those 
to be found in ever; Automatic 



IVER JOHNSON REVOLVER. 




Do you Know that an acci- 
dental discharge of this revol- 
ver is absolutely impossible ? 

Do you Know that this fact, to- 
gether with general excellence, is re- 
sponsible for the building up of th e 
largest revolver manufacturing business 
in the world ? 

It is, and what more could be said ? 

The Iver Johnson Bicycle is another of our products, and its 
superiority is universally acknowledged. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



New York Salesroom : 99 Chambers St. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 



THE CELEBRATED 



NATIONAL CUTLERY CO. SHEARS 

Acknowledged the best and fully warranted. 
Not connected with aoy Shear Combination. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, .1 

Ladies' Scissors, 
Barbers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips. 




DECATUR, BULL & CO., Sffia 



Who Comes 
Here? 



This, our friends, is the genial sales- 
man for The Alabastine Company. The 
story he has to tell may seem some- 
what familiar — nevertheless, he has new 
features that will interest you. Listen 
attentively to what he may have to say. 

If in need of goods, and cannot wait 
for him, send in your order by mail. 

The trade supplied by Wholesale 
Hardware and Paint Dealers. 



The Alabastine 
Co., Limited, 

PARIS, ONT. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 West Front Street, 

MORSE CI_IF=f=» 



ronto. 



ONLY 

WHOLESALE 



Henry Boker's 
'Keen Cut" Horse Clippers. 
'Perfection" " 
Ball Bearing" " 





American Hone Clippers. 



The "20th Century" 
Horse-Clipping Machine. 



" Empire State." 
" The 8tar Pointer." 



THE NEW CHICAGO 1902 
HORSE-CLIPPING MACHINES. 



National Newmarket. 
The I. X. L. Ball Bearing. 






Stewart's Patent Knife. 



No Belt to Slip, Positive Power, Bigid Base. 



All Gearing eut from Solid Metal, 
(not cast 



FOR HORSE SINGERS AND FULLER PARTICULARS OF HORSE CLIPPERS. SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE 

H.S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO u.,«d. Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY. 



Graham Nails aro the 

Faotory : Dufftrin Itrtst Toront 



l-t. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE AIGHT 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLY 

DEPARTMENT 



ELECTRICITY ON BRITISH RAILWAYS 

\ I" a recent meeting o( the British 
~\ Westinghouse Electric and Manu- 
facturing Co. , the principal portion 
o\ George Westinghouse's address was 
devoted to the possibilities o\ substituting 
electric traction for steam oi\ local lines 
where regular and frequent traffic is 
necessary, says The Hardwareman. Alter 
saying thai the orders in hand at the 
Manchester works included eight 5,500 
K. \V. turbines and generators for the 
Underground Electric Railways Co. of 
London, Limited, and the three 3,500 
K. W. turbines and generators for the 
Metropolitan Railway, he went on to say 
that the rate of development of electric trac- 
tion in Great Britain would depend largely 
upon the facility with which the required 
capital could be raised, the machinery 
constructed, and plants established. Since 
the last meeting several of the leading rail- 
wax companies had taken action in regard 
to "electrification." The North-Eastern 
had already invited tenders for the equip- 
ment of about 4"> miles oi' its lines in and 
about Newcastle. This company, instead 
of building its own plant for the manu- 
facture of electricity, was proposing to 
take a supply from The New castle-on- 
Tyne Electric Supply Co., and this might 
be considered a precedent of importance. 
If there were at the present time a supply 
of current available along the lines of rail- 
ways there would undoubtedly be a rapid 
development of electric traction upon 
branch lines which were now worked with 
little satisfaction to the public and at great 
COSl lo the railway companies. The Lan- 
cashire and Yorkshire Railway Co. had 
announced their intention to electrify their 
line between Liverpool and Southport, 
while the Great Eastern and the Brighton 
Companies had given notice of their in- 
tention to apply for Parliamentary powers 
for a similar purpose. 

AN AUTOMATIC SWEEPER. 

Of the main improvements that are lo 
be added to the equipment of the King 
Edward hotel none are more remarkable 
than the apparatus designed to clean the 
i arpets of the building. This broom will 
$6,000, bul those who have ex- 



amined it state that even at that cost its 
installation would effect a great economy. 
The apparatus consists of a small machine 
in the cellar, two cylindrical separators, 
to which are attached pipes leading to the 
various floor-. At each floor is a long 
hose with a T-shaped brass nozzle, with a 
thin slit running the full length of the 
head, which is quite flat. The machine 
is operated by steam furnished from the 
plant heating the building. Each stroke 
of the piston draws the air in a continuous 
stream througV'the nozzle, hose and pipe 
into the separator. T^e force of khe suc- 
tion is so great that not only is thefsurface 
of the carpets cleaned, but dirt runbed or 
stamped into them is drawn out. 

This unique apparatus is the invention 
itf D. T. Kenney, New York, and this is 
the first to be installed in Canada, the 
decision to introduce it here being a re- 
commendation from Mr. Joseph Wright, 
of the Bennett & Wright Co., Limited, 
Toronto, who, while on a visit to New 
York, saw the machine in operation. Mr. 
Wright expressed to Hardware and 
Metal the opinion that the day would 
probably come when these machines would 
be taken from door to door in gasoline or 
electric carriages and sweeping done by 
the job, the machine being worked by 
its own power. 



BRITISH CYCLE PROFITS. 

The London Statist, which several weeks 
ago published comparison of earnings 
statements of several leading British cycle 
companies, has gathered further informa- 
tion on this score, which, like the previous 
returns, points to a further improvement 
in that industry abroad. Erom these 
figures is compiled the follnwing compar- 
ative tableof net profits from four-companies: 

Bowder Eadie New Huraber 

Brake. Ltd. Manfg. Centaur. Ltd. 

1898 £ 42° /£9.49i '^IS.130 

31899 1.977 5. 142 "2,408 

1900 I 4.S5° 2 .3 2 9 "2,168 ,£n.553 

1901 25,125 13495 2,609 19.054 

1902 40,610 16,725 4,656 21,087 

a Nine months. Note the dates of the fiscal 
years are not the same in all cases. ■ Nei loss. 

Brussels, O11L, lias passed a by-law to 
loan 55,000 to Cotteridge Bros., who will 
operate tin; Brussels Woollen Mills. 



CATARACT AUXILIARY CO. 

THE promoters of The Hamilton Elec- 
tric Light and Cataract Power Com- 
pany have organized a second com- 
pany, The Cataract Auxiliary Co., of 
Hamilton. The charter of the new com- 
pany empowers it "to manufacture, sell 
or purchase electric power, whether gen- 
erated by water power, steam or other 
force, and to apply the same in any of the 
arts or sciences, or in the manufacture of 
any article, or in any condition in which 
the use of electricity is employed for the 
purposes of the company's business ; and, 
generally, to have the benefit of all powers 
given, in the act respecting companies for 
supplying steam, heat, electricity, or nat- 
ural gas for heat, light or power." 

Hon. J. M. Gibson, who is a director of 
the company, states that the company had 
been formed for the purpose of increasing 
the plant, and to work out the steam 
auxiliary feature of the Cataract Power 
Co.'s enterprise. The steam auxiliary is 
being established on Victoria avenue, and 
it is calculated to help out with the power 
during a couple of months in the winter, 
when the demands for power and light 
overlap. For about two months in the 
winter the lights have to be turned on an 
hour or so before the factories shut down 
for the day, and the steam auxiliary is to 
come to the company's relief and overcome 
difficulties in the matter of supplying all 
the power and light required. The auxili- 
ary company, which is under agreement 
with the parent company, will double the 
power capacity at DeCew's Falls, the idea 
being to supply all the power the Interna- 
tional Harvester Co., Deering division, 
may need, as well as power required by 
any other company. 

GOLDIE & M'CULLOCH ENLARGING. 

Goldie & McCulloch, the machinery firm 
of Gait, Ont. , have found the demand for 
their goods manifesting such growth in 
recent years that they have been compelled 
lo plan new works, which will be built on 
a much more extensive scale than their 
present premises. They will be erected 
close to the town limits of Gait, about a 
mile from their present location. They 
have secured 26 acres, with railway facili- 
ties of the most satisfactory character. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 




Will Hold Up a Shelf! 

That's what HsIirin.rHrkrliM Inr, 
For Una pnipow I In- reran '"• 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

limn 111,- .... 

BRADLEY STEfcL SHELF BRACKE1 

It In well Japanned, Strong. ■»■>•» Light- 

I'lic saving In I'ri-tgtit ll ft KouTl profit, aside 
from Hi.- lower price hi whloh iln- foods ari 

S>#" Order ill reel or through your JobbOI 

aTLAS MFD CO.. New Haven, Conn , USA. 

ANNEXATION BARGAINS. 

In New and Rebuilt Machinery. Wrile for spi '■'' 
price* on ihe following : 

BAND SAVI M \( mini 
30-in. Bracket. Goldie & McCulloch Make. 

Pedestal, American M.ikr. Nl W 

j' in " Silver Mfg. Co , Pattern. 

3,1 in. " Cant liros. Make. 

I INSMI1 IIS' TOOLS. 
-•o in. Squaring Shears. 

j«-in. " Crosby Make, NEW. 

31-in. " " Brown. Hoggs, NEW. 

oo-in. Sheet Iron Folder. 

EMERY GRINDERS. 

Double Emery Grinder, Pedestal Style. 

Hench 
No. -■ Twist Drill Grinder, NEW. 
Emery Grinder, Wet Too 1 . 

SPEED LATHE, 
ti in. Swing, 48-10. Bed, Pitman Make, 
to-in. " si-in. " Kitchburg Make 
6S4-in. " 34 in. ". Duiulas " H. G. 

IRON KLXNERS. 
34 in. x J4-in x 6J4 ft. Planer, London Make, NEW. 
oin. x 6-in x 2 " " Federal, NEW. 
Monthly s iock List and Supply Catalogue sent on request. 

H. W. PETRIE 





ii- , 15 ] , 9i w 11 and 
s 111 U 11 N Is H -. BtatloTi * . l' 'l:i >\ 1 1 1 






iyEffJvJ! Blacksmiths' 


pV Hand 


J 


Drills. 


The very 
1 H- best. 


A. B. JARDINE & CO. 


HESPELER, ONT. 




<ijjjjj^ M _i» We Make 




fi4\<L G00d 



DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 





Write for Catalogue 
It tells all about 

tht'in. 



The Kerr Engine Go. 



Walkerville, Ont. 



They are eaaily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a atove 
by any one. 



Pleaae your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 




Sold by 
Jabbers 

oi . . . 



Hard ware- 
Tinware 

and 

Stoves. 

EXTENDED. 

Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY. Dubuque, Iowa. U.S.A. 

" TAYLOR-FORBES CO.. Limited. Guelph, Ontario. 



ft 



THE PEERLESS" 



i. ill,- ben Bolster spring ever produced A inn- 
line tin the li.iniw.tr.- trade Write Us for Prices 




JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of' 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 

H. W. Petrle 141-146 Front Street West. TORONTO Selling Agent. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS, 

ST. MARYS, ONT.. CANADA. 

"Maxwell Favorite Churn" 



Steel Frame Churn. 



Patented Features: Improved Sieel 
Stand. Roller Bearings, and loot 
and I land Lever Drive, and Detach- 
able Driving Link Imp oved for 
hi of 1003. Steel or Wood 
Frame .is desired 




LAWN MOWERS. 

Hieb and Low Wheels, from tain 1020m widths. 
C.ld Rolled Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and 
Culling Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not otter you these "THE MAX WELL " Lawn Mower 
.irlicles High Wbeel in Im 

SEND DIRECT TO IS. 





Wheelbarrows. In ( °^ r different uses. 



MAXWELL MOWEB 

A Wllt**>l 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE MAKING OF STEEL TUBES. 

\T the meeting oftheCycle Engineers' 
Institute, held in Birmingham on 
December 11, W. J. Talbot, 
A..M.I.M K.. read a paper on "Steel 
Tube Manufacture," dealing particularly 
with the seamless tube used for naval pur- 
poses and cycle construction. A few years 
ago, tubes wore almost universally made 
hv the hot process, but that was now more 
or less obsolete, and modern practice 
tends to various cold-drawing methods. 
Some of these.after describing the material 
and its preparation in the rough, the author 
proceeded to explain, using diagrams to 
make his description clear. He showed 
that the Mannesmann and Stiefel pro- 
cesses, which came under the category of 
"hot work," did not finish the tube, but 
carried the production to the cold-drawing 
point. Large tubes were usually drawn 
on a parallel bar and loosened afterwards 
in a reeling machine, and with tubes of 
2- : 4 inches and over for Admiralty pur- 
poses, where a very narrow limit of 
eccentricity was allowed, it was; necessary to 
turn the tube down after the first pass. 
The number of turns the tube had to make 
through the drawing-dies depended on the 
use to which it was to be applied, to the 
guage and size, and to other circum- 
stances, but before each pass it had to be 
annealed, and pickled in a hot vitriol bath, 
and finally dipped in a lubricant before 
reinsertion in the dies. Annealing was 
the most expensive part of tile process, 
and the author emphasized the need for 
efficient muffles, which could be worked to 
give rapid heating, very gradual cooling, 
a neutral atmosphere, and an absence of 
contact between the tubes and the muffle- 
Barnes, these being essential conditions to 
economical production. Bad surfaces 
were due to very slight causes, principally 
arising out of the pickling, and constant 
care was needed to avoid loss from impuri- 
ties in the acid, unsuitable water, strong 
or overheated pickle, etc. Mr. Talbot 
supplemented his paper by a number of 
tables showing the results of tertsile tests, 
the loss of weight due to the processes, 
the corrosion which follows exposure to 
acid solutions, salt water, and pure water 

the last tests having been made with 
plain and coppered tubes. With the acid 
solution and pure water the coppered tubes 
had the advantage, but salt water corroded 
the plain tube more slowly than it did the 

ifed samples. 

In an animated discussion which fol- 
lowed the reading of the paper, Mr. Cle- 
ments, speaking as a practical cycle 
manufacturer, said pickling was, no 
doubt, at the bottom of many of their 
troubles, especially those arising from the 



peeling of enamel. To the pickling by 
acid w.is due the rusting of the insides of 
tubes, and the rust inside the tubes, owing 
to the slenderness of the walls, soon per- 
colated through, and so caused the strip- 
ping of the enamel. With a view of 
overcoming thai evil so long as pickling 
was necessary Mr. Clements suggested 
that tubes should be treated in the same 
way as gun-barrels are treated in the 
preliminary process of "browning" — 
they should be boiled. They should be 
immersed for 10 or I 5 minutes in a boil- 
ing solution of soda — a pound of soda to 
a gallon of water and afterwards washed 
to free them from the soda. They should 
then be boiled for a further period of 20 
minutes in pure water distilled water, if 
possible ; if not, rain water. By this pro- 
cess, the tube would become thoroughly 
cleansed and coated with magnetic oxide, 
and if the enamelling were properly done, 
the risk of stripping would be very slight. 

MACHINERY NOTES. 

r pHE directors of the Consolidated 
1 Pneumatic Tool Trust have decided 
to erect their new works in a small 
town in Scotland, giving as their reason 
that the workmen will live better and more 
comfortable there than in a large city, and 
will thus be more vigorous and contented. 
About 5,000 men will be employed. 

A No. 2 Petrie boiler was shipped to W. 
D. McRae, Wallaceburg, Ont, by H. W. 
Petrie, Toronto. 

The Dominion Harness Co., Port Elgin, 
Ont., have purchased from H. W. Petrie, 
Toronto, a 20-in. Barnes upright drill for 
their plant. 

A Little Giant planer and matcher, a 12- 
in. buzz planer and a spoke and axe handle 
lathe have been shipped by H. W. Petrie, 
Toronto, to Albert Harris, Collingwood, 
Ont. 

Mr. Joshua Peters, formerly manager of 
the Moncton, N.B., Record Foundry and 
Machine Co., has gone to North Sydney 
to fill an important position with the Nova 
Scotia Steel and Coal Co. 

A machine shop will probably be erected 
n Winnipeg or across the Red River in 
the spring. Mr. Murrav, of the Rat 
Portage Iron Works, has been in Winnipeg 
looking over the situation. 

In the German army estimates $25,000 
has been set apart for experiments with 
field automobiles, as trials with these ma- 
chines made up to the present time have 
shown them to be of permanent value. 

Additional tools in the shape of a 2 1 -in. 
swing, 8-ft. bed, Crosby Co. 's screw cutting 
engine lathe, and a Hi-in. by H-ft. Porter 



lathe were installed in the plant of the 
Taylor Safe Works by H. W. Petrie, 
Toronto. 

Manager Douglas, of the Otis Elevator 
Co., proposed at a meeting of the Hamil- 
ton, Ont., Board of Trade, that a com- 
mittee of manufacturers canvass manu- 
facturers in the United States with a view 
of having them locate establishments in 
Hamilton. 

The Mineral Range Iron Mining Co., 
which is engaged in developing the mag- 
netite resources of Hastings County, will 
construct an electric road in connection 
with their enterprise. The road will run 
from the company's property to L'Amable 
Station, on the Central Ontario Railway. 

The Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co. , 
of Toronto, has been instructed by the 
Deputy Minister of Militia to make semi- 
annual inspections and reports upon the 
hot-water heating boilers, which are in- 
stalled in military buildings in the Do- 
minion, except those in Nos. 10 and 11 
Military Districts. 

Geo. Heamon, of East London, Ont., 
has designed a new style of snowplough. 
It is supported on a double set of runners, 
like a sleigh. The blade is adjustable in' 
height, so that on board walks it will clean 
off snow to within half an inch of the sur- 
face, while on smooth concrete walks 
the snow will be entirely removed. There- 
are shafts attached to the plough, and a 
seat for the driver. There is also an 
attachment for sprinkling sand on slippery 
walks. It is estimated that it can be made 
at about $35. 

ROLLING MILLS IN TORONTO. 

The announcement was made this week 
by a prominent shareholder of the Toronto 
Steel Co., who is also closely identified 
with the Dominion Iron and Steel Co., 
that the directors of the Toronto company 
had decided on the erection of a rolling 
mill in conjunction with the structural 
steel mills and general works at present 
controlled by the company. The necessary 
capital for the construction of the mill had 
already been set aside by the directors, and 
the work would be started as soon as the 
arrangements at present being made with 
the Toronto city council had been com- 
pleted. The particular reason given for 
the establishment of the new mills was 
that a much larger market for all kinds of 
steel was growing rapidly throughout 
western Canada, and that large profits 
would be rendered possible by the com- 
pany having its own rolling mill. The 
pig iron and steel billets could be secured 
from the Dominion Iron and Steel Co. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



v^ «xl^ avLat ^.w^ mMjm ma ObLa tvl># *il-> *.!,■•> #,8,* •>.!,• svLai ■>!,■•> ■>!,-* Oil,-* am *>■,-« am tkBLai avLai am >■!,■> am am) avL* a If* aI>* ■>!,-♦ ^l-» aM,-* am aIi* am ».B^ avL«> «k»i^ a^B^ ^B^ aI.^ aI« »■ !-— a>|^ *M 

I There is Money in it For You. J 






A well-assorted line of "Comfort 1 Bicycle Sundries will 
find a read] Bale. 

Pedals, Handlebars, Bells, Spokes, 
Pumps, Cement, Tires, Etc , 

will always be in demand and yon cannot afford to be without 
them. 

Write to the only manufacturers of Bicycle Sundries in 
Canada for their New Catalogue and Price List. 



ACCESSORIES DEPARTMENT 



* 
* 

* 
4 
* 



| Canada Cycle and Motor Co., Limited % 

"3 Toronto Junction, Canada. 



t- 




THE AUER, 
GAS LAMP. 

"TURNS NIGHT-TIME INTO DAY-TIME." 
New Styles. Lower Prices. 



Do you want a lamp which 
won't tire your eyes? 

Do you want a lamp which 
makes sewing or reading 
a pleasure ? 

Do you want a lamp which 
gives more light than 
half a dozen kerosene 
ones for less money ? 

Do you want t< i sell the best lamp on the market ? 




No. 21 
100 Candle Power. 



THEN WRITE FOR 



OUR CATALOGUE AND DISCOUNTS. 

Every Lump Guaranteed. 



AUER LIGHT CO., 1682 NOTRE DAME ST., MONTREAL, 



3 









5 



TKADK MAR 



Burgon & Ball, Limited 

•<fJ\ Willi WHOM Is IM OKI'OKA 1 K I > 

(soundJJ Burgon & Wilkinson 

(Lata Wm Wilkinson 4 Son-, 



,«.►>" -*. 



fl* 



WIL 

KIN 
SON 




Established 1730, and foremost ever since Manufacturers of the celebrated 
BBA Sheep SVears. now made with special hollow ground razor edge, thereby 
saving grinding, as the blade can be worn down fully H of an inch without 
affecting the edge. These Shears hold the World's record, as 3,654 sheep 
were shorn with one pair. If your jobber does not carry them in stock, write 
for circulars and particulars to . . 




r B l I > K MARK 



Decatur, Bull & Co., ^*% 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

Sole Canadian Agents. 



6c 
WI L. 

K I N 
SON 



TRAPS HARK 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE OFFICE 



DEVOTED TO THE 
OFFICE STAFF OF 
BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS. 



INVESTIGATING THE ACCOUNTS. 
Bj H II 

TAKING stock of his accounts is as 
necessary to the merchant as taking 
stock of his goods. The banks 
monthlv balance their books and thus are 
enabled to keep themselves informed of 
the extent of their business and whether it 
is going back or advancing. Likewise, 
every merchant should take stock of the 
accounts in his ledger as well as of the 
goods i'n his shelves. He should scru- 
tinize the names of his debtors. Some of 
his customers he will find especially desir- 
able ; others, he will rind slow pay and 
not desirable. The good ones should be 
well treated and promptly waited upon, 
and if they have any complaints these 
should be quickly investigated and settled 
in a manner that will give satisfaction to 
all concerned. If concessions be neces- 
sary, even though it means an actual loss 
to the merchant, they should be made to 
retain custom. 

The hardware business, like every other, 
ha- slow and poor payers amongst its 
customers. These should also be con- 
sidered, but in a different way from the 
others. They should be made to pay 
more for their goods than those who settle 
their accounts promptly. It is just and 
right that the people who buy their 
hardware, etc., and keep the hardwareman 
out of his money for a time needlessh 
long, giving him other unnecessary ex- 
pense and great bother in collecting his 
accounts, should pay the highest ruling 
price for their goods. It is only fair that 
the man who settles promptly his accounts 
should bin hi- goods at the lowest price 
going. Complaints about overcharges 
cm be met by giving a discount for im- 
mediate settlement. 

Besides, the slow-pay customers are the 
ones who scarcely ever pay. It is a fact, 
we are sorry to say, that some people 
make it a practice of running accounts 
with their hardwareman, tailor, dry- 
goodsman, and everyone else they can, 
without intending to pay their debts. 

Caution should be exercised in opening 
out new accounts. Reports of the finan- 
cial standing of the would-be-customer 
should be obtained from mercantile 
agencies, and as much found out about 



him as possible before giving him the 

goods. A customer of this sort often max 
deal with you for months, always seem to 
have lots of money and pay cash ever) 
time for the goods until you are confident 
that he is square and honest. He asks 
credit for a small amount, gets it, and 
settles promptly the first lime. The next 
time he gets in deeper ; at last a large 
account is run up, and then you never 
see him again in your store. You resort 
to the law courts, but find legal proceed- 
ings are useless ; he has everything in 
the name of his wife, or he resorted to 
some other means to avoid being com- 
pelled to pay his debts. Such cases as 
this are too common among the trade. 
The merchant would do well to be on the 
alert and work up a cash business as far 
as possible. 

The credit system of itself is all right, 
but should not be abused. 

PENCIL-POINTING MACHINE. 

Grand & Toy, office outfitters, Welling- 
ton street, Toronto, have a unique office 
device in the shape of "Jupiter" pencil- 
pointing machine which they are showing 




to the public. By the invention of the 
"Jupiter "a long felt want for a pencil- 
pointer is supplied. The accompanying cut 
is an illustration of this practical office 
device. 

ACCOUNT COLLECTIONS BY DRAFT. 

The prevailing system of collecting out- 
of-town accounts to-day is by draft, either 
at sight or time. There is, however, 
amongst the retail trade, to a certain ex- 
tent at least, a prejudice against this 
system of collecting. If the retail mer- 
chant who is thus prejudiced would con- 
sider the time, trouble and expense of 
remitting, which is saved by simplv ai - 
cepting a draft, this system would no 
doubt become more popular. Another 



important advantage is in the mallei of 
cash discounts, which items are very often 
overlooked by the busy man, and which by 
the draft system are always assured. 
When a draft is returned without any ap- 
parent reason, the credit man has no 
option, but must write the customer, 
usually ina courteous way, requesting him 
to state why the draft has been returned. 
It the draft is incorrect, the customer will 
no doubt reply to this effect at once, but, 
in nine cases out of ten, no reply is forth- 
coming, and a man who has some 3,006 
or 4,00(1 accounts to deal with is obliged 
sometimes to write several letters before 
receiving a satisfactory reply. The rela- 
tions between debtor and creditor are in 
this way strained considerably where a 
line or two from the debtor would have 
prevented any unpleasantness or misunder- 
standing. The customer must be reason- 
able and do his part. 



BUSINESS PERSONALS. 

I). G. Scott, of the Merchants Hank. 
Montreal, has been transferred to the 
branch at Gait. 

Mr. Edmunds, of the Hank of Com- 
merce, Winnipeg, has been removed to the 
branch at Ottawa. 

Mr. Fellows, of the Hank of Montreal, 
Montreal, has been transferred to the 
branch at Ottawa. 

C. A. MacMahon, of the Wblverton, 
Ont., branch, has just been named assist- 
ant accountant of the Sovereign Bank in 
Montreal. 

S. L. Smith, of the Hank of Montreal, 
at Guelph, on leaving for New Westmin- 
ster, B.C. , was presented with a handsome 
gold locket by the manager and staff. 

E. T. Horn, formerly assistant to Mr. 
Russell, the manager of the Intercolonial 
Railway at Moncton, has been appointed 

assislanl to the general superintendent of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railway, with 
headquarters ai Pittsburg', Pa. 

The Adams Furniture Co. last month 
celebrated t he anniversary of their moving 
to their new building at City Hall Square, 
Toronto, by a tastefully arranged " At 
Home," which proved a popular event 
with their many customers and friends. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



THE C. O. YOUNO CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

AND SUPPLIES 
No. I Adelaide Street East Toronto 



GLUE 



i licking 

kind 1 lie ln-sl 
011K IS in.tnut.i. 

lured In us 



Write foi quotatona 



W. Harris & Co., °;^ 



Ave. 

TO 



WESTERN 

** ACCITDAN 



Incorporated 
1851 



ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire and Marine 

Capital - $2,000,000.00 

Assets, over - 2,900,000.00 
Annual Income 3,000,000.00 

Head Office: TORONTO. ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox. President. J. I. Kenny, Vice-President. 
C. C. Foster, Secretary. 



Are You Well Stocked 

With liood Wrapping Paper ? 

It not ><>ii will find a to your ad 
vantage t" order our brown or 
manilla. Il is a good strong, dur- 
able atul cheap paper. 
Tbere is leas waste when good 

wrapping paper is used. 

MADE IN CANADA 
by the 

CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



P 



OINT U fOR 

BUSY MEN. 



x snom IA1K 

BY 

LONO DISTANCE TtLtPMONi 

OTTEN SAVES 

A LONO WAIT. 

TRY IT. 



Illl BELL TELEPHONE 
CO. Of CANADA. 



TRADE WITH ENGLAND 

i.li.m a ho « . be i to I 

with the Ol'l CountT) 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The eddr.ai Is I6S Fleet St . 
London, England 

The COat il only '» DOT week, (Annual 

ption, including postage, (4.80.) 
Moreover, reg '.rrs are allowed 

tn .1! iout chargr in tin- paper. 

1 r ale 



ESTABLISHED 1855 

TAYLORS 

* # riRF& BURGLAR **• 




HAVE MANY EN TED R(jVEMENTS 
NOTFOUND IN her MAKE5 
THAT WILL WELL REPAY AN 

INVESTIGATION 

8v THOSE. wH ° TO SECURE 
DESIRE. i u ° v- 

THE BEST SAFE 

J. & J.TAYLOR. 

TORONTO SAFE WORKS. 

TORONTO. 
HON TREA L VA NC OLIVER 

WINNIPEG VICTORIA 



THE TIME TO INSURE IS 



NOW 



While you are WELL. STRONG and INSURABLE. 



THE 



Confederation 
Life 

ASSOCIATION issues policies on all approved plans 
of insurance, and is a prosperous and progressive 
Canadian Company. 

PROTECTION FOR YOUR FAMILY. 
PROFITABLE INVESTMENT FOR YOURSELF. 

Pamphlets and full information sent on application. 

W. H. Beatty, Esq., 

PRESIDENT. 

W. D. Matthews, Esq., Frederick Wyld, Esq., 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



W. C. MACDONALD, 
ACTUARY. 

HEAD OFFICE. 



J. K. MACDONALD, 

MANAGING DIRECTOR. 

TORONTO. 



iMPmssiom 




i luai %r >/ - ■/ .-.. a/ai .- 



A Course in 
Advertising 
by Mail for 

One 

Dollar 



The most practical instruction possible 
to receive may be had by reading each 
issue of Impressions regularly. ** Live 
articles by the very best authorities. *» 
One dollar a year. 

The Print Shop 

St. Catharines, Ontario 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




THE MANUFACTURE OFCASTOR OIL 

C* ASTOK OIL is produced in Cali- 
fornia. Italy. Mexico and India, the 

lirst named hi ing the principal pro- 
dacing Geld. 
In both Calilnraia and Mexico the pro- 

■ i extracting oil fioin the seed is 
simple. Alter gathering the seeds in the 
fall of the year they arc placed in dry- 
ing furnaces for an hour or so for a sufli- 
i it-ii t time to soften the seeds, as the 
greater percentage of the oil contained in 
a seed can be obtained when the seed is 
soft. After tlicv have heen removed from 
the dryer they are placed in the press, 
similar to a cider pi ess, and the seeds are 
crushed. The oil runs into a large bowl 
directly beneath this press and is mixed 
with about an equal portion of water and 
boiled for one and one half or two hours 
-thus precipitating the albumen and 
other impurities. When cool there will be 
a thin scum on top which is skimmed oft. 
The water and oil are then separated, 
sometimes by running the water off and 
sometimes by " bailing " out the oil, 
which is placed in the " sun tanks " — 
(tanks of metal exposed to the sun) 
where it bleaches for eight or ten hours 
and is then icmmed to the storeroom, 
where it is placed in barrels, carboys, 
etc., ready for the market. Some of the 
trees in California reach a height of 50 
ieet, and the seeds from one tree contain 
as much as I") gallons of pure oil. 

PRACTICAL PAINT CALENDAR. 

John Lucas & Company, of New York, 
Philadelphia and Chicago, are sending out 
to the trade this year one of the most 
practical calendars received by " Hard 
wan' and Metal " this year. The calendar 
pad is printed in white on a dark green, 
the letters being large and easily read. 
Above the pad is a view of Longfellow's 
home, Cambridge, Mass. Printed on the 
calendar, underneath the pad, are many 
hints to painters and paint dealers, such 
u , help in case of accidents, antidotes 
for poisons, weights and measures, tests 
for linseed oil, turpentine, etc. This cal- 
endar should be secured by all hardware 
dealers, who can have them by mention- 
ing " Hardware and Metal.' 

PRIVATE POST CARDS. 

I he United Factories, Limited, Toronto, 
have had designed and printed two pri- 
vate post cards, which, from either the 
artistic or commercial standpoint, are 
about as good as anything yet issued in 



Canada. One of these portrays half a 
dozen designs of brushes, a cut of the 
firm's trade mark and the firm's name, 
the other presents an assortment of 
woodenware. All the goods are shown in 
their natural colors, and as the work- 
manship on the work is of a high order, 
these cards will be received with pleasure 
by the trade. 

ADVANCE IN QUOTATIONS. 

The Francis-Frost Company, Limited, 
Toronto, have changed quotations on 
their " Ark " brand paints from $1.20 to 
SI. 25 per gallon. 

NEW BRUSH AND BROOM FACTORY 

T. S. Simims &. Company, Limited, St. 
John, N.B., held a reception at their new 
factory on Tuesday, last week. They 
have one of the best appointed broom 
and brush plants in Canada. The offices 
and sample rooms are very handsome, 
but it was the splendidly arranged fac- 
tory which commanded particular atten- 
tion. 

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS CO. ENLARGING 

Expansion is the order of the day at 
the Toronto brunch of The Sherwin- Wil- 
liams Company just now. This firm have 
found it necessary to strengthen the sup- 
ports for the floors, because of the great 
weight of stock carried. They have, 
moreover, been compelled to enlarge each 
of the four floors of the warehouse fully 
50 per cent. These extensions are a re- 
sult of the increasing business in the To- 
ronto district trade of this company, 
which has necessitated their carrying 
about three time? the stock in Toronto 
that was carried last year. The offices 
of the branch a:e also to be enlarged. 

PAINT AND OIL NOTES. 

T. G. Richardson, painter, St. John, 
N.B., is dead. 

An increase of about 5c. is noted in 
turpentine this week. 

The Consumers' Varnish Company, of 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

A. Joly & Company have registered as 
painters, in St. Louis de Mile End, Que. 

Wilks & Mi'hfud have been appointed 
curators of R C. Thornloe, painter, etc., 
Montreal. 

Markham. (Int.. lias voted in favor of 
exempting The Loanl Brush-handle Fac 
lory from taxation. 

I he Toronto Painters' Union have elect 
ed Thomas Cordon, president, and R. W. 
Fletcher, secretary. 



The Sun Oil Retiring Company, of Ham- 
ilton, Limited, is authorized to increase 
its capital from 5>f>0,000 to $100,000. 

The . Hamilton, Ont., Broommakers' 
Union have elected H. P. Walker, presi- 
drnt, and Wa'ter Rolls, secretary-treas- 
urer. 

Robert Munro, manager of The Canada 
Paint Company, was confined to his 
house three or four days with a severe 
cold. 

The travellers from all the paint houses 
of Montreal are again on the road, after 
spending the holidays with their friends 
at home. 

The annual meeting of The Canada 
Paint Company, Limited, will be held at 
the head office, Montreal, on Saturday, 
January 17. 

The excitement over the new oil wells 
in Raleigh township, neat Chatham, Ont.. 
continues keen Several new wells, of 
more or less volume, have been struck. 

The large stock of paints, oils and var- 
nishes carried in Westman's hardware 
store, London. Ont., had a narrow escape 
from fire on Monday night, but the flames 
were checked when about $100 damage 
was done. 

Moft'att's, Limited, 33-35 Charterhouse 
Square, E.C.. London, Eng., are introduc- 
ing to the British trade an incandescent 
oil lamp, which they claim will give from 
70 to 80 candle light with an oil con- 
sumption of one quart in from 12 to 15 
hours. It is constructed with a silver 
cone for the outer wick tube, which, in 
conjunction with a new style of burner 
and a special form of chimney-gallery will 
prevent the flame from increasing in vol 
time when left alone. 



PAINTS 



We manufacture 
these brands : — 
LION," "PEERLESS," "OWL," 
" RAVEN," also Ready-mixed 
House and Floor 
Paints, Roof, Barn, 
Bridge and Brick 
Palnls.Coach Colors, 
Varnishes, Japans, 
etc Our prices will 
interest you. Write 
us. 
The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont. 







CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






Don't TaKe CKances. 








Don'l take chances of losing youi customei bj telling 
him an infei ior Painl 

Vou maj make monej out <>i him once, but he ia n^iu 

Ion \ ei 

Give him a satisfai tot \ Paint. 

Sell him "Ark Brand." 

Id II come again, and will always be .1 k"" 1 ' advertisei 
for you. 

This is not so when you sdl him something with which 
you know he will 1 u >t be satisfied. 

He'll be satisfied with "Ark Brand," and \<>u will have 
made an hones) profit from the sale. 

"Ark Brand" is made for interior and exterior us,-. 

Let us till you more about it. 



I 






Francis -Frost C^ 



u 



Canadion Distributing Agents 
for Grippin'a CracK Killer. 



Toronto. 



~ 



Biiv 1 ni 



BEST PAINTS 



AND SAVE YOUR HONEY. 

It is always cheaper to buy the best. It costs as much to 
apply a cheap as it does a good Paint. 



A. A A 



THE 

HOLLYWOOD 



? m a kicker by 
nature, but now 



"BEAVER" BRAND 



and 



"T.L &C. CO." BRAND 



PURE 

PREPARED 

PAINTS 



flANUKACTl. RED BY 



THE T0R0N10 LEAD k COLOR CO., 



TORONTO 



Limited 



AR 



BEST. 



For interior and exterior use. Most economical, because 
they cover the greatest surface. Cheapest, because they wear 
longest. Most satisfactory, because they look best. 

EVERY TIN GUARANTEED. 

As for our New Century Catalogue and Color Cards. 




HOLLYWOOD 
PAINT CO. 

Li mi to. 1 

Hamilton, - Ont 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PAINT AND OIL MARKETS 

MON 1 Kl \i . 

VII. the paint dealers bave already 
representatives on the road, though 
.11 receiving orders from their 
ih.'\ only li'i't i heir headquarters the first 
of the week. There i- a slight advance 
in linseed oil on the English markets, but 
up to th. present the local quotations 
hanged. There is an ad 
m the pi i i of turpentine, w hich is 
mted i'oi in- the very strong feeling 
in the South, and a still further advance 
is not at all improbable. A rumor is 
afloat among the trade that a general 
advance in prices may take place in the 
: iinre. We quote : 
GKOUND WHITE LEAD.— Best brands. 
Government etandard, (4.90 to $5.15; 
No. 1, $4,674 to 84.774 ; No. 2, 84.30 to 
84.40; V.. ::. 83.924 to 84.02$; No. 4, 
83.55 to 83 65 all f.o.b., .Montreal. Terms, 
1 months, or 3 per cent, oil for cash in 
30 days. 

IU:\ WHITE LEAD.— 15 in casks, and 
in keys, 85.25. 

DRY WHITE ZINC.-l'ure dry, in 

casks, f>ic; in 100-tb. kegs, 6£c No. J 

zinc, in casks, 5£c; in 100-tb. kegs, 5$c. 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Pure, 

25-tb. irons, 8c; No. 1, 7c.; No. 2, 6c. 

PUTTY.— We quote : Bulk, in bbls., 
81.90 per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 
S2.05 ; bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; blad 
dei-s, in 100 or 200-lb. kegs or boxes, 
82.40 ; in tins, §2.55 to $2.65 ; in less 
than 100-tb. lots, S3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
(Juelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. higher, 
f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL.— Casks, 7c; 100 
lb. kegs. 7Jc; smaller quantities. 8Jc 

RED LEAD.— Genuine red lead, in casks, 
$4 50 ; i" 100-tb. kegs, 84.75 : in less 
quantities. So. 75 per 100 lb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, S4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities. So. 50. 

LITHARGE.— Ground, casks, 5c; less 
quantities, ~>\c; flake litharge, casks, 
85.25 ; small-," 85.75 per 1 1)0 lb. 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, 60 to 63c in 1 to 
1 bbls.; 59 to 62c. in 5 to 9 bbls. Terms, 
net cash in 30 days. Delivered in Ont- 
ario, between .Montreal and Oshawa, at 
2c. per gallon advance. 

TURPENTINE.— Single barrels, 80c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 79c. Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 

SHELLAC VARNISH.— Pure white, 

-, to *2 15 ■ orange, $2 25 to 82.35. 
MIXED PAINTS.— 81.20 to 81.40 per 
gallon. 

C ISTOR OIL. 8| to '•'!'•. in wholesale 
lots, and fcc. additional for small lots. 
LL OIL l- to 50c. 
COD OIL. 35 to 

PARIS GREEN. Canadian ; Petroleum 
barrels, I3jc. per lb.; arsenic kegs, I3^c; 
50 and 100 lb. drums, 1 In : 25 lb. drum-. 
1 1 .'.<-.: l-Ib. packages, 15c; J-lb. pacl 

I lb. tin-. 16c; \ It/, tins, 18c. Eng- 
lish : Petroleum barrels, I !>. ; arsenic 
I | J,.- ; 50 to 100 lb. drum-. 15c . 25 
Hi. drum-. \~>l<-; lib. paper boxes, 16c; 
I lb. tins, 17c. 

TORONTO. 

Turpentine has advanced 4c. per gallon, 
the rise being dun to enhanced pra 
primary markets, where it is claimed the 
market is almost cornered. Linseed oil 
is firm in p imarj market- and stead] 



here. ().di-is foi white had are being 
booked, subjecl to possible changes in tile 
tariff, the leelin^ i.<ring thai the tariff on 

pig lead and lead products may be ehan 
not much doing yet, as 
the travellers an just getting down to 
business aftai the holidays. We quote: 

WHITE LEAD. — Ex-Toronto, pure white 
iead, So to 85.25 ; No. 1, $4.62£ to 
$4,674 : No. 2, SI. "25 to S4.50 ; No. 3, 
$3,874 to 84.12^.; No. 4, $3.50 to $3.75 
in packages of 25-tb. and upwards ; 4 C - 
per lb. extra will be charged for 12^-lb. 
I'ksjs.; genuine dry white lead in casks, 
$5,024. 

RED LEAD.— Genuine, in casks of 560 
84.50 to $4.75; ditto, in kegs of 100 
tb., 85; No. 1, in casks of 560 tb., $3.75 
to 81; ditto, kegs of 100 lb., $4.25. 

LITHARGE. — Genuine, 6 to 6Ac. 

WHITE ZINC— Genuine, French V.M., 
in casks, S6.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6 to 
S6.25. 

SHINGLE STAIN.— In 5-gallon lots, 
60 to 75c. per gallon. 

PARIS WHITE.— 90c to $1 per 100 tb. 

WHITING.— 65c per 100 tb. ; Gilders - 
whiting, 80c 

GUM SHELLAC— In cases, 35c ; in 
less than cases, 40c per lb. 

LIQUID SHELLAC— Pure orange, in 
bbls., $2.25 to $2.35 ; white, $2.35 to 
82.45 per gal. ; in less quantities, 10c 
extra. 

GLUES.— Broken sheet, in 200-tb. bbls., 
84c per tb.; cabinet glue, in bbls., 12c; 
emery glue, in bbls., 174c; bookbinders', 
ground, 10^c; finest American, white, 
19c; No. 1 American white, 15c per tb. 

PUTTY.— Bladders, in barrels, $2.25 ; 
bladders, in 100-tb. kegs, $2.40 : bulk in 
bbls., SI. 90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up 
to 100 lb., $2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins. 
less than 100 lb., $2.90. 

PARIS GREEN.— Petroleum bbls., 14c 
per lb.; arsenic kegs, I4$c; 50 and 100 
lb. drums, I5c; 25-tb. drums, 154c; 1-lb. 
packages, 16c; -£-tb. packages, 18c; 1-lb. 
tins, 16c.; -J-tb. 18c. 

PLASTER PARIS.— New Brunswick, 
$2 per barrel. 



PUMICE STONE.— Powdered. $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls. and 4 to 5c per tb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c in small lots and 
8c in bbls. 

LIQUID PAINTS— Pure, SI. 20 to SI 10 
per gallon ; No. I, $! 10 per gallon. 

BARN PAINTS.— 65 to 70c per gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— English, in cases, 9 
to 94c per tb. and 10 to 104c for single 
tins. 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, 1 to 2 bbls., 65c ; 
boiled, 68c; 3 to 5 barrels, raw, 64c ; 
boiled, 67c; 6 to 9 barrels, raw, 62c ; 
boiled, 65c delivered. 'To 'Toronto, Ham 
ilton and London, 2c less. All quauti 
ties of 10 bbls. and over of linseed oil 
sold only f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don and Guelph. 

TURPENT1M Single bbls.. 81c; 2 to 
!! bbls., si e. delivered. Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London, 1c less. Eor less quanti- 
ties than barrels, 5c per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages. 
50c and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GASOLINE AND BENZINE.— We quote: 
Benzine, 19£c and gasoline, ordinary, 
21 Ac and engine, 22£c. f.o.b. Toronto. 

WINDOW GLASS. 

MONTRKAT. 

Little business is doing in window glass 
at present and dealers are not looking for 
any immediate improvement. Prices re- 
main unchanged. Our quotations are as 
follows : First break, 50 ft., 82; second, 
82.10 for 50 ft. ; first break, 100 feet, 
$3.80; second break, 4; third bnak. 
$4.50 ; fourth break, $4.75. 



TORONTO 

There is nothing doing. Prices are still 
stea.lt. We quote: Under 26.1X1., $4.25; 26 
to 40 in., $4.65 ; 41 to 50 in., $5.10 ; 51 
to 60 in., $5.35; 61 to 70 in., $5.75; 71 
to 80 in., $6.25 : 81 to 85 in., $7 ; 86 to 
90 in., S7.75. Toronto, Hamilton and 
London. Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 
30 days. Discount, 15 per cent. 





SATISFIED CUSTOMERS 

mean increased trade. 
To satisfy your customers you must handle the best goods. 

"ANCHOR" LIQUID PAINT 

has been on the market for the past twenty eight years, and has always given 
satisfaction, the White Lead used in its manufacture is BRANDRAM'S B. B. 
GENUINE, acknowledged to be the best in the world. 

If not already represented in your town 



Send us a post card and let us tell 
you all about It. 




HENDERSON 
4 POTTS 




HALIFAX 

ANIl 

MONTREAL. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAI. 






CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisement* under this heading. 2c. a wor*. 
each insertion; cash In llrUOt I-> ttrr», BsroTM, 
and abbreviations each count »> line Ward in Mamat' 
liiK cost. 



FOH SALE 



Ci)k S \i.i-. Din i «, i .\r.i ISH1 I) HARD 

* wan Business in rapidly growing town oi 
Collingwood It haa good connection and in 

ide; owner retiring Apply lo I Hend 

• lollingwood (5) 

DO YOI WW I V Slil" 01 IINNER'S OR 
number's tools at > bargain? it so write 

B I 
(S) 

HARDWARE— GOOD PAYING iu.mm» 
excellent location, s.ilrs mostl) cash, stock 

$4 ooo, all HrM-claSS. Owner K°' n K i nto manu- 
facturing, Will sell quick at price on dollar. 
Address care London Fence Machine Co., London, 
I .m.ida. (tf) 

A i OPENING BEST AND MOST SUCCESS 
ful hardware business in first-class Westc n 
Ontario town. 2,500 population. Agricultural dis- 
trict equal to anj in Canada, G od livestock, 
value over $4,000. Proprietor going into manu- 
facturing. Splendid opportunity, must sell q ick. 
Address 'Hardware," care London Fence Ma hine 
Company, London, Ontario. (tf) 

WILLIAM ABBOTT 

Representing Jonas it Corver'i celebrated "Noro" 
Air Hardening Steal. Especially adapted tor Iml'Ii 

speed and for all Classes of t»v >1> and work. Kasily 
annealed, for Shaping into Milling Cutters, Dies 

au.i other tools stork on baud for Immediate 

orders 

Office and Sample Room. 13 St. John Street, 

MONTREAL. 



vX.J M 






. • 



Strathy Wire Fence 

IS THE PERFECT WIRE FENCE. 

Undei pn 

■• 
1 oib-ii win-, or Hand ni.«. i>- v>iib plain or coilod wire 

YVMII> I Ok QUOTA IIIlN; A|£cnl« Wanted 

Strathy Wire Fence Co., - Owen Sound. 



r 



STEVENS 



ALL STI 
TOOLS 



1 



ARE 



STANDARD FOR QUALITY. 

Your stock if not complete without a full line of our Biflei, Bhotgans, Pistols, Tools 
and Victor Bicycles. 

Handled by the Leading Jobberu. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p -°.- l7 Bo " Chicopee Falls, Mass , USA. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. ZiW&^TFlr Chmmht " 5t 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



********** 



' 



l 



Start the New Year Bright and Light. 

Install LUXFER PRISMS and make Business Easy. 
We manufacture and deal in all kinds of — 

GLASS FOR 
STORE FRONTS 

and INTERIORS 
Will make suggestions valuable to your customers. Discount to Trade. 

Luxfer Prism Co M Limited 

IOO King Street West TORONTO. 

**M^**^*^*****mmm***m 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



AND ALLIED TRADES 



SIMPLE WAY TO HEAT A 
GREENHOUSE. 

M\\\ householders are considering 
about how to keep their little 
oho uses warm during the 
severe winter. A lot of them have been 
trying oil stoves and things of that sort, 
Imt obviously tin- suitable plan is to con- 
up with 'ho kitchen boiler. How is 
this to be done '.' Bere is the answer of 
an expert : Hie fust question to be de- 
cided is whether or not the tire-box in the 
is large enough for heating the 
kitchen and doing the regular cooking, 
and ha? capacity to heat the water re- 
quired for domestic purposes, and then 
have a reserve capacity sufficient to heat 
the amount of radiating surface required 
in the greenhouse. If the boiler in use 
tumbles, it is evidi-nce that the water- 
back make- steani. and consequently can 
heat more water than is now being used. 
The next question is the size of the green - 
. and, in the absence of the dimen 
sions, I can only suggest that 20 square 
feet of heating surface in the greenhouse 
will be equivaVnt to heating ten gallons 
extra of hot water for ordinary use. 1 
assume that it is only a small conserva- 
tory attached to the building, and that 
it will not reqjire a very large radiator. 
The best way In pipe will be to take the 
brass coupling out of the top of the boiler 
which supplies the hot water service pipe, 
and use in its place a 1 -in. iron pipe with 
on it for supplying the domestic 
supply system from the side and the con- 
servatory radiator from the top, to in- 
sure the conservatory getting the hot 
Water quickly. It may be necessary to 
place an air valve at this point to permit 
any air that ma\ accumulate to escape. 
The pipe can then b( carried to the radi- 
ator coil, and the return of the same size 
can be carried to the water-back, using 
a tee to recei i the cold water from the 
boiler as well as the return water from 
■ onservatory coil." 

BUCK STOVE CO. TO ENLARGE. 

A Brantford, Out., despatch says that 
The \\m. Buci Steve Company, of that 
city, have decided to make an outlay of 
$100,000 on a new factory. The Canada 
Cycle and Motor Company's premises in 
Brantford bave been purchased, and addi- 
tional buildings will be put up. Con 
stiuction will commence in the spring, 
and at their completion the works will 
include the following building Ware 
bouse and shipping department, 00 x 300 
feet, toui n.illioom, 50 x 100 feet, 



one storey ; machine and mounting de- 
partment, 40 \ 226 feet, three storeys ; 
pattern and polishing shop, 40 x 150 feet, 
one storey ; nickel-plating and buffing de- 
partment, 30 x 70 feet, one storey; steel 
range and sheet department, 48 x 65 feet, 
three storeys ; japanning and finishing de- 
partment, 25 x 50 feet, three storeys ; 
office, sample rooms and stores, 40 x 150 
feet, three storeys ; mounting shop, 160 x 
275 feet, one storey ; pattern vault, 40 x 
125 feet, one storey. In addition to these 
there will be a powrr-house of three stor- 
eys, besides a large cupola attached to 
the moulding shop. 

HOT-AIR STOVES. 

INLETS to stove chambers (the air- 
heating space) must enter, and the 
outlets must leave, at points which 
will insure the flow of air having the 
most intimate possible contact with the 
stove, says Ironmonger. The cold - air 
ducts (tubes) to sto\ e-chamber should be 
three-fourths the total area of the warm- 
air ducts to rooms. The grating to the 
cold-air ducts, lined with wire gauze, 
must be double the area of the ducts. The 
warm-air ducts to rooms (residence work) 
should be : Ground floor, 50 square inches 
area per 1,000 cubic feet of space in the 
rooms ; first floor, 40 square inches ; sec- 
ond floor, 32 square inches. The registers 
or gratings in rooms through which the 
warm air is delivered should have one- 
fourth greater area than the ducts. This 
is to insure slow or diffused delivery. Note 
that the area of gratings means the area 
of the voids or spaces in the gratings. 
Gratings average three eighths of iron- 
work. It is in the highest degree essen- 
tial that extract ventilation should exist 
or be provided in the rooms. Warm air 
will not enter •! room already full of air, 
but it will enter if the air already there 
is being extracted and the inflow will be 
in exact ratio with the extraction. If 
ordinary chimney-flues exist, these (if hav- 
ing normal draught I are efficient extrac- 
tors, and a '■> by 9 chimney will serve a 
fairly large room The following aie the 
usual figures, though the extract shafts 
have varying efficacy, according to their 
height : Extract shafts, ground floor, 32 
square inches per 1,000 cubic feet of space; 
first floor, 40 square inches ; second floor, 
50 square inches. Gratings to these (if 
any i can have a clear opening of same 
area as the shafts.' 



A PATRON SAINT OF TINNERS. 



C T '. ] 



T. PERRAN is the patron saint of 
inners, and is said by The London 
Globe to have invented their ban- 
ner, a white cross on a black background, 
symbolizing the black tin ore and the 
white metal. Some think it was he who 
first taught the Cornish folk to "stream" 
for tin. But he lived in the fourth cen- 
tuiy after Christ, so it is difficult to re- 
concile this with the other legend of the 
Tynans, who traded in Cornwall in the 
days of King Solomon. Be this as it 
may, St. Perrarj was a man of great local 
importance in his day, for many villages 
are called by his name, such as Perran- 
/.abuloe, Perranwortha, Perranuthnoe and 
I'ei ranporth. There is a story that he 
sailed the seas from Ireland sitting mir- 
aculously upon a floating millstone, so, 
perhaps, his story is not to be entirely 
accepted without question. However, one 
evening when the holy man was cooking 
his supper, he took a large, heavy, black- 
stone for one side of his fireplace. This 
primitive stone burned with intense heat 
and suddenly a stream of brilliant white 
metal Sowed from the block of ore. The 
saint rejoiced and called the Cornishmen 
together that they might celebrate his 
discovery with feasting. This they did 
with much zeal, consuming their national 
drinks of mead and metheglin in such 
quantities that "drunk as a Perraner" 
passed into a proverb that remains to the 
present time. This event took place on 
the second Thursday before Christmas, 
since called I'ierous Day and still kept as 
the tinner's holiday. 

AMONG THE TRADE. 

T. P. Bell, hardware dealer, of Beeton, 
Out., was in Toronto on business on 
Wednesday. 

Three hundred cars of coal per week are 
now arriving in Toronto, about half of it 
being anthracite. 

A. W. Carrie k, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of The Gurney Foundry 
Company, Toronto, is back to his desk, 
after several weeks' absence through ill 
ness. 

Smith's Falls. Out., has defeated a by 
law to fix the assessment and taxable in- 
come for ten years of The Could Manufac- 
turing Company, manufacturers of stoves, 

etc., of that town 



MANTELS, GRATES and TILE. 

Are any of your customers building a new house ? If so, why not 
try and sell them a mantel as well as hardware ? They will want 
one, and it will pay you. Write us for catalogue and price. 

THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

"76 York St., TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MHTAL 






The Selling Qualities 

Or our splendid range 

]k Imperial Oxforc 

make them the most desirable stock you 
can handle. 

THEIR DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

and other improved features, give them a quickly ap 
predated precedence over other ranges. 

Housewives everywhere praise them enthusiastically. 

Customers realize their superiority on sight — sales 
are easy. 

They're the popular range of Canada. 

Send us your address at once. 



THE GURNEY F 



CO., Limited 



TORONTO. 



WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 







THE QURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



NORTHERN" 




"These aire 



JUST A FEW 



Cold Facts 



IN FAVOR OK 



The" 



Northern" Refrigerator 



"It's a 

Seller" 



Raised panels. 

New style swing base 

Antique flow finish. 

Fancy brass locks and hinges. 

Hardwood ice rack. Extra large ice-box. 

Zinc lined throughout. Galvanized Iron Shelves. 

Air space insulated with paper and wood. 

Look into It before placing orders — it will pa> you. 
For dimensions and prices write 



DRY COLD .AIR PRINCIPLE. 



TheThos. Davidson Mfg. Co., l " ted Montreal, P.Q. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 
Winnipeg, January 5, 1902. 

r |' , HERE cannot be s.iid to be anj hard- 
1 ware market, a-* trade is experiencing 
the usual after holiday depression. 
Nearl) all the jobbing houses will spend 
the next month taking stock and getting 
read) for Spring. There will be a now 
price list out next week, and, although 
there will be few changes, there will be 
a general revision ot the lists. The out- 
look for trade in building hardware is 
excellent, as plans are already under wa\ 
for main new buildings, and all indica- 
tions point to an extremely active building 
vear. There will also be a very extensive 
trade in barb wire. The large number o\ 
American settlers coming in have increased 
the demand, as they are accustomed to 
fencing their land at once, and our own 
people are fencing more land every year. 
Quotations are as follows : 



Barbed wire, ioo lb 

Plain twist 

Staples 

Oiled annealed wire 10 

ii 

12 

13 

14 

15 

Annealed wires (unoiled) ioc. less. 



83 25 
3 2? 
3 65 
3 42 
3 48 
3 56 
3 66 
3 76 
3 91 



Cut Nails— 

2d 1 in g| 10 

3d Kin. i!s in . . 4 10 

3d iX in 3 75 

4<i \% in 3 50 

5d 1 K in 3 5° 

6d 2 in 3 40 

8d 2% in 3 25 

iod 3 in 3 20 

2od 4 in 3 15 

30d 4 54 in 3 10 

4od 5 in 3 10 

5od =,'A in 3 10 

6od 6 in 3 10 



Wire Nails — 
1 in 



$4 20 



i'/a in 4 20 



IX 
1% 

1% 

2 

2% 

3 

3H 

4 

4M 

5 

5* 

6 



Horsenails,40 per cent. discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Bar iron, $2.60 basis. 
Swedish iron. 84-75 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 

Spring steel 

Machinery steel 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 

Jessop 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 

1 8 to 22 gauge 

24 guage 

20 guage 

28 gauge 

Galvanized Iron, American, 16 gauge... 

18 and 20 gauge 

22 and 24 gauge, 

26 gauge 

28 gauge 

30 gauge 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 
Apollo, 10K oz. 

28 guage 

26 " 

24 

22 gauge 

20 and 18 guage 

16 gauge 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 

26 guage 

28 ' ' 

Genuine Russian, per lb 

Imitation ' 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 

a6 gauge 



3 85 

3 60 

3 60 

3 So 

• • • 3 35 

• • ■ • 3 3° 
.... 3 25 

3 2 ° 

3 20 

3 20 

3 20 

3 20 



4 3° 
4 15 
4 55 
4 4° 
4 4° 
4 15 



2 85 

3 25 
3 5° 
8 5° 

13 00 
3 50 
3 75 

3 9° 

4 00 
4 10 
4 00 
4 00 
4 5o 
4 5° 

4 75 

5 00 



5 00 

4 75 
4 5° 
4 50 
4 50 
4 25 
4 00 

4 75 

5 00 

5 25 
11 

°7 
8 00 

8 25 



Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 50 

IX 12 50 

I XX 14 50 

Ingot tin 33 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 00 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 5 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis 813 00 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 1500 

Solder 20 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 % 

Round" " 82H 

Flat " brass 80 

Round " " 75 

Coach 6; p.c. 

Holts, carriage 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 and 5 p.c. 

Tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Flat head stove 60 and 5 p.c. 

Round head 60 and 5 p.c, 

Elevator 60 p c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

" No. 12 36 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch 10% 

\i inch ZV t 

5-16 inch 5>4 

X inch S% 

7-16 inch 5 

% to % inch 4& 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s.g. hickory, doz. . 82 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra I 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, OF., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 pc. 

OF. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley 's soft, 12 gauge black. 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 18 00 

soft, 10 gauge 21 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 00 

Chilled 6 50 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

" " plain 75 and 2% p.c. 

pieced 

Japanned ware 37 J4 p.c 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 and 10 p.c. 

Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 



PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 

Prime white American 

Water white Canadian 

Prime white Canadian 



2454 c. 
23'Ac. 
23c. 
2iKc 



SCRAP. 



No. 1 cast iron $14 to $15 per ton. 

No. 2 " 5 to 6 

Wrought iron scrap 5 

Copper (heavy) 7c. per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7 54 c. 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c to 254c 

Zinc scrap ■ ic. 

PAINTS. OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels 8 83 

Less than barrel lots 88 

Linseed oil, raw 71 

Boiled 74 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 27 'A 

Eldorado engine 26 Mi 

Atlantic red 2o54 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil ig'A to 21 54 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 56 

Neatsfoot oil 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil.... 200 

Pure castor oil, first pressure 11 

Lubricating 10 



Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 5 50 

51 to 60 " " " 600 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2)i 

White lead, pure per cwt. 6 00 

No. 1 " s 75 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade andcolor, per gal. $1. 301081.9° 



MOTES. 

The weather of the past week has been 
so mild (hat good progress has been made 
with the brick work on the Cockshutt 
Plow Co.'s new building. 

\V. ti. McFarlane, Western manager for 

the Marshalls Hardware Co., has gone to 
Duluth to consult with the heads o( the 
company as to plans for 1903. 

The Canadian-Port Huron Co., Limited. 
have received their letters of incorporation 
for the purpose of manufacturing and 
dealing in implements, tools, etc., at Win- 
nipeg with a capital stock of $100,000. 

The Manitoba Iron Works Co., that has 
recently applied for incorporation, has 
taken over the Standard Machine Works 
and will erect new workshops and foundry 
on Logan avenue. 

The American-Abell Machine Co. has 
most kindly loaned its great, new ware- 
house, 200x2260 ft., to the curlers for the 
Bonspiel. This is a great advantage, as, 
owing to the presence of the Scottish curl- 
ers, an unusual amount of ice is required. 
The building will give 20 additional rinks. 

Wm. Plaxton, of the firm of Plaxton 
Bros., one of the oldest plumbing houses 
in the West, died in Carlsbad, Austria, last 
week. Mr. Plaxton had sought the 
famous waters as a cure for jaundice, but 
had apparently gone too late. Mr. Plax- 
ton was 51 years of age and leaves a wife 
and adopted daughter. 



NEW HARDWARE FIRM. 

Three Regina, N.W.T., young men 
have purchased the building and stock of 
John A. Kerr, Regina, and after Pebruary 
15 will carry on a wholesale and retail 
hardware business there under the style of 
The Western Hardware Co. It is pro- 
posed to pay particular attention to 
builders' and blacksmiths' supplies, and, 
in addition, all classes of hardware for 
farm and general use, shelf goods o! all 
kinds, stoves, ranges, etc., will he kept in 
stock. A workshop will be carried on in 
connection with the store, and special at- 
tention will be devoted to hot-water heat- 
ing, ^pumps, and pipe-fitting in all its 
branches, furnaces, furnace work and tin- 
smithing. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



MORE NEW LISTS. 

VLONG with othei Canadian makes 
of shovels .1 reduction in price l>a^ 
been made in those of The Halifax 
Shovel Company, ranging from $l to 

$:.'."><> per dozen. The new lists an a> 

follow S : 

BKOUKFIBI P 

Prlii 

I ' Ipl 81 • |« i iUn 

i> bandli . Miliar point, blai k I *U Ml 

1 . 41 

i 

17 in 
polished 1 l I U 

:i 
.... ,i 

I l? 60 

" i i.l i» blank 1 U 00 

i ISM 

I M mi 

17 00 

poliahed 

;i || 00 

I |0 DO 

,, i; n 

ljunv " square point, blank - 18 "o 

3 i 

11 " polished 

j io 00 

round point, blaok - IS 00 

:>, is ■'•'I 
poliahed 

:: || 00 

nl pt., furrow shovel, narrow, blank 16 00 
" po] 

shovel, ibaUow, pan blaok 9 15 oo 

■• po] 9 I • SO 

PI I KKS. 

Price 
Description sizr. per 'I"/ 

I> handle, square point shovels, black. 

9 13 im 

I IS .'ill 

6 14 50 

poliahed •-' 13 mi 

3 13 50 

4 14 00 

■■ a is oo 

round poinl " blaok '.' IS 50 

3 13 00 

I 13 50 

poliahed 9 13 oo 

3 13 M 

4 14 00 

Long lull . square poinl " blaok •-' 13 50 

3 13 00 

1».|isIh-,1 9 13 00 

3 13 .-jO 

round poinl *' blaok ■-' 12 ">o 
3 13 00 

poUsbed -' 13 no 

3 13 .V) 

•■ furrow shovel mir oik .' 12 50 
I«.l -.' 13 00 

" shallos pan 9 13 00 
I>IK 9 11 10 

Gil MOUR. 

run 

D iptlon. - •perdoz 

l> handle, square point, shovels, blaok 9 HI 00 

• • 3 11 .mi 

poliahed 9 11 so 

3 is ini 

round poinl black .' 11 00 

3 11 50 

poliahed 9 ll 60 

3 IS 00 

square poinl blaok I 11 00 

3 ll 50 

poliahed I ll 50 

3 is 00 

round poinl ' " blaok •-' ll i»i 

" 3 11 50 

polished 9 11 ■"*> 

... 3 v . ,„ 

nl. pi., furrow shovel, narrow, black 3 11 00 

i-.i 9 n SO 

•• shore), shallow pan, blank 9 ll 00 

poUah'd ■-• ll :-i 

Iii spades, a reduction has been made 
of Si per do*, in Brookfield, (8 in Peters 



and $2 iO in llilmour, Fenert) remaining 
mi. hanged, Hie lists are • >- follows : 



IIKlUiKI III n 

1 1 

puttahi 'i 

■ 1. 1.,, k 



i 
i . .' 

i . -i 



ri 1 1 ks. 

r. . 

|. ■ l .1 I . • I , N 

I... k J 

3 

pobahod 

.i 

Long " bbwk 

:l ■ 

polished ■-■ IS 00 



i. II MOUR. 

I . . |p| i. mi No pel .1../ 

D handle, square poinl spades, blaok 9 11 "" 

poUahed 9 11 10 

blaok 9 ll oo 

poliahed - ll 50 

The. reduction in scoops includes Fen- 
ert) alone, Brookfield being the same as 
before, li amounts to 30c. per dozen in 
all lines except " long l> handle," No. 6, 
which is $2.20 per dozen lower, and "D" 
polished ashpit ami " D" black Heur and 
house furnace which an- unchanged. The 
list i> : 

FENER I \ . 

i 
Desci iption. No per doz. 

D handle, black '.' SIS 80 

•• " I II 00 

17 30 

•> 17 SO 

polished ■_' It 3o 

" ' 4 17 30 

17 80 

i. 18 30 

half polished 8 lfl oo 

in 90 00 

black, Im ' "ill. In in y ■'■ 17 gfl 

new Battel n 6 17 BO 

" extra heavy, rd pi ■■ 17 so 

Long l> handli . for salt, extra beavj I 16 .^i 

poliahed asbpil 9 17 00 

I) liitii.lli . black, flour uml bouse fumsi II mi 



PHOENIX FILE CO.'S PLANT SOLD. 

The Nicholson File Co. have recentlj 
purchased the stock, machinery, tools, 
etc., of the Phoenix File Co., which was 
operated tor man) years In the late F. 
Bausch, Cull- St. Paul The Nicholson 
Com pan) have removed the entire plain to 
their Dominion Works, Port Hope. 



The jour ne) men plumbers »f Pun idence, 
K.I., have in their union meeting rooms a 
library of trade publications and technical 
works relating to their trade This would 
good thing (or the master plumbers' 
organizations as will a- foi the journey- 
men's unions of Canada'to do. 



JAPANS 




"But who can 
Paint like Nature!" 

It is not given to us to paint like 
nature but the CANADA PAINT COM- 



PANY take the crude pigments which 
nature so generously provides and fashions 
them into a number of striking and ser- 
viceable colors for the use of the com- 
munity. To go straight to the point, if 
you are interested in good durable paint 
and varnish, patronize the Canada Paint 



Company's manufactures. Please note 
that, notwithstanding increased com 
petition, the bookings in December for 
Spring shipment are double what they 
were for the same period last year. 
To avoid disappointment order early. 
Address The CANADA PAINT COM . 
PANY, Limited, Montreal or 
Toronto. 




VARNISH 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




IJ 



!,,- 



QUEBEC MARKETS 

HARDWARE. 

Montreal, (January 9, 1903 
USINESS in wholesale hardware cir 
cles has been seasanablj quiet since 
the holi '..■■ - Many of tin- travel 
are in from their routes, and several 



factories have been shut down for repairs 
or stock taking. The outlook for spring, 
however, is as encouraging as ever, and 
there is little doubt bul that the year 
1903 «ill 1»' quite as prosperous unless 
in the event of some unlooked-for set- 
back, as last year At all events trade 
conditions are now in a most healthy 
state, both among wholesalers and retail 
en*: The retail trade during the holiday 
weeks was lively, and payments to whole- 
salers are reported good. ''Stanley" 
rul.s have advanced 5 per cent., and 
"Stanley" levels are about 16 per cent. 
higher. Saturated paper is now quoted 

M.T.") |)(T 100 II). 

BARB WIRE. The market is still quiet. 
The price is $2.00 per 100 lb. f.o.b. 
Montreal ; $2.55 fob., Cleveland, in car- 
lot- of 15 tons : $2,674 f.o.b., Cleveland, 

in -mailer lots. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— There is still a 
very slow movement and no particular 
change in prices. We quote : No. 5, $3.70; 



Woe 6, 7 and 8, S3. 15; No. i>, *-2.(>5; \o. 
10, $3.20: No. 11, $3.26; No. 12, $2.80; 
No 13, §2.90; No 14, $3.75. In carlots, 
f.o.b. Cleveland : No. 5. S2.20; Nos. 6, 7, 
8 and '.». $2.15; No. In. $2.20; No. 11, 
$2.25; No. L2, $2.30; No. 13, $2.40; No. 
I 1. $2.50. In less than carlots. l2Ac pel 
I mi tb. extra is charged. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.- A few orders 
have been received, but the market rules 
quiet at unchanged prices. We quote as 
follow-: Bright and annealed, §2.50 
per Kill lb. f. o. b. Montreal, Toronto, 
Halifax. London, Hamilton and St. John. 
Net extras per 100 tb. are now as fol- 
low-: Coppered wire, G0c; tinned wire, 
S2 ; oiling-, 10c; spring wire, $1.25 ; best 
steel wire. 75c; bright soft drawn, 15c; 
special hay-baling wire, 30c 

FINE WIRE— There is but a small 
amount of business passing on this mar- 
ket. The discount remains at 25 per 
cent, with the following extras : 1 and 2- 
1b. hanks, 25c per 100 lb.; ^ ft. hanks, 
37-Jc. and £-ft. hanks, 50c. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.— Both 
these wires move slowly. They are dis- 
counted at 62^ per cent. 

PENCE STAPLES.— A small amount of 
business has transpired on the local mar 
ket on a basis of 83 per 100-ft. keg for 
galvanized staple- ami $2.80 for bright, 



with 25c. extra for 25 and 5(1 ft. pack- 
ages. 

WIRE NAILS.— Trade is quiet at un- 
changed prices. We quote : Carlots, $2.10; 
small lots, $2.45 per keg f.o.b. Montreal, 
London. Hamilton, Toronto, Brantford, 
Windsor, Out., and St. John. 

CUT NAILS— There has been a slight 
improvement in tin- demand, but the mar- 
ket is still inactive. Tn carlots, the price 
is $2.40 per keg. and in small lots, $2.45 
per keg. 

HORSE NAILS. Business this week is 
of small proportions. "C.L.C." horse 
nails are discounted at 57^ per cent. off. 
The discounts are quoted as follows ' 
" C " brand, ]u. 10 and 7£ per 
cent, off; on "M" brand, "Oval," 57^ per 
cent.; "New City," 57^ per cent.; " New 
Countersunk," 65 per cent.; "Monarch," 
65 per cent.; "Peerless," 50 and 7$ per 
cent. 

HORSESHOES.-The demand is small 
and the market rules quiet. We quote as 
follows : Iron shoes, light and medium, 
pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.35 ; No. I 
and smaller, $3.60 ; snow pattern, No. 2 
and larger, $3.60 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
§3.85 ; X L steel shoes, new light pat- 
tern, sizes 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.45 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.70 ; feather- 
weight, all sizes, to 4, $5 ; toe weight, 
all sizes, I to 4, $6.25. Shoes, more than 



creamery Cans and Trimmings 



. * 



0*0 




h 



^ 



>:■ 



-t> 




CREAMERY CANS. 



CREAMERY TAPS. 



With Locking 
Attachment Cover. 



With 
Slip Cover. 



Steel Retlnned 
Top 



Loose Key 
Metal Tap. 



" FAMOUS" 

MICA 

GAUGE. 



As we carry a complete stock at all times of the above lines prompt shipment can always be made. 
A heav) stock of Sheet Tin of all sizes, gauges and quality always on hand. 

rhe McOlary Manufacturing Oo. 

LONDON, TORONTO. MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N B. 

"Everything for -tho Tinshop." 



'^ 



^ 



%? 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



ENGLISH 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 

FIRE 

BUILDING 

ENAMELLED 

SILICA 

MAGNESIA 

DRAIN 
CULVERT 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



BRICKS. 



PIPES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERP1PE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

« CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO. OUT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 



BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Imperially adapted for Car Wheels. Malleab'e 
Castings, Boiler lubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery wh re griat strength 
1 r <|ui cii; Strong, High Silicon Iron, tjr Foundry 

I'urp. ses. 



.. 



MIDLAND 



J5 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefull] selected Like Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Price to Sales Agents 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 
or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 



"ii. i..- in ■ kee,, ID.:, per keg exlrn. 

t o.b Monti ''ill only. 
i;l\ i: is \\n Bl RR8 I ten ordai 
• .[.. .i tad this] wtt I I he di» ounl ■ 

nut I ii ' hanged \\ e qui il ■ BV 

Iron ii\«-ts, Motion carriage, and w 
box, black rivet-., tinned d.> , ooopara 1 
riveta and tinned ' and 

in pet .-••lit. . ■wedes Iron bum araquot 



ad at 58 i"-i 



..Il 



ippei 



it 



with the iiHiial proportion Of liurr , LB 

• ut. ofl anil coppered iron rivets and 
burn, In 5 lb. oarton boxea an quoted 

.it 60 and 10 per cent, nlT list. 

BOM B LND NUTS The markel loi 
bolti and nuts ba not i banged to an) 
appreciable extent Discounts are Nor 

holts, 56 per cent, ; 

oommon, 50 per cent , full square car 

". per coat.; machine bolts 

I 5 per cent., coach sere.' 
per cent. l-i-li hoc bolts, 66 and B 

■ nt . blank bolts, 50 ami 5 pel 
cent.; bolt ends, ">0 and 5 per cent. ; 
plough bolts, 50 and 5 per cent. To any 
ntailcr an extra discount of 10 per cent 
is allowed. Tire bolts, <">7 h per cent. ; 
stove bolts, 07* per cent. Nuts, square, 
8*C. per !b. off list; hexagon nuts, :i?c. 
per lb. olT list. To all retailers an extra 
discount of $c. per lb. is allowed. 

SCB1 H S The discount on -■ ""•'■ 
unchanged. Trade baa not impn 
The discounts are quoted as follows: 
Round head bright, 82$ and 10 per cent.; 
Hat head bright, st I .,,,,1 [Q pei cent . 
round heads, 76 and Hi per cent.; 
brass, Hat heads. B0 and 10 per cent 

CORD LGE \ reduction of V has l n 

made in sisal and latlnarn. We quote: 
Pure tnanila, 14c; British pure manila, 
I •2c. ; sisal, lie; single lathyarn, in}.' 

BUILDING PAPER. The price of ready 

roofing has been advanced 6c. There u 
a lielii movement, and our quotations 
is follows : Tarred felt. $1.98 per 
100 lb.; J ply, readv-roofing, 00c. per roll; 
I pi] . $1.18 per roll ; carpet felt. $2.25 rer 
100 lb.; dry sheathing, 35c. per roll; tar 
sheathing, 15c per roll; rirv fibre. 

per roll; tarred fibre. 00c. per roll; K 
and I \ I . 65c. per roll; heavy straw and 
sheathing, s:',u per ton; slaters' felt, 00c. 
pei roll. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH. -There is very 
little doing. The quoted price is $1 10 
per inn square feet. 

ETREBRII KS rrade is quiet. Prices 
are as Follows English, $16 to $22 and 
Scotch, $17 to $22 per I. 

' I Ml \ I \ small amount of business 
is doing and price- are unchanged. We 
quote as follows: Canadian cement, $1.90 
■ 25; German, $2 'J" to $2.30: English. 
$2 15 to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 to $1.96 pei 
bbl. ex wharf, and American. $2 10 to 
$2 21 ■ 

SNOW >llll\ I I - I ; a fair le 

mand. We quote " Habitant." $2 

$2 10 ; " Victor." I" per '.-nt. off : Bteel 

railroad shovels, 18 and ."> per cent. off. 

I'IKI. Sl|ll\ ELS \ moderate trade IS 
doing, discounts being as follows: No. 70, 

384 t<> In.-, per dozen; No 56, 55 I 

Mo 57, --' : to Me No 60, B2J to 

No "' to SI Ut; ' SO t" 

"Duplex," No 7. $1 21; \ 
$1.52; No. 11. $1.82. 
SKATES I he demand has fallen ofi to 

some extent. Quotations a! e : Halifax 
pattern, 36c per pair; nickel-plated 
per pair; ladies' nickel plated. I 
pair; ladies' concave nickel plated. - 
plain hockey. 27( to $1 36; nickel plated 
Locke} ,6 19 50; double end hockej . 

' s ;-, 



Bar Iron 
Horseshoe Iron 
Hoop and Bar Iron 

All " Dominion Crown," 
English make, at low pril 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Horcbantn Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



When a Man Wants a Pump 

iini mil that in buying a 

Our I'um; 

and our guarantee ii .it tin- 
back of every Pump we m.inu 

• 

Should tl ■ 
the Pump which are due to our 
negligi make 

it good or refund the money. 

The R. McDotigall Co., 

i butted 

<i \i i. ONT. 
Manunu toren of Hij np i 




Pig Tin. 



"Boustead &> Co's" Penang 

'♦Straits" 

"Lamb and Flag" 



'Lake" 
'MA" 



Copper 
Galvanized Sheets. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u.^ 

NEW GLASGOW, U.S. 

u — 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS HARTTJI 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOCKEl STICKS ftere is still boom 
movement in these, and the prices are ha 
follows. Best second growth, goal keep 
.■is'. 81 20 per do*.; as lm, 12 26; 

|] 10; common, 90c Etegula- 
ti<>n pucks, Si 50 per doz. 

• \ I. HODS rbere lias not been much 
demand during the past week. Quotations 
follow : Japanned, 16-in., $4.50 per do/.; 
17-in.. $4.80; 18-in., $5.10: with gold band, 
17 in . J5.10; 18-in., $5.40. Galvanized, 
If. in . 16.20; IT in.. 16.50; 18-in., $6.80 per 
do/. The discount is 45 per cent. 

I INTERNS.- These are moving out 
(airly well still, business being done on the 
following basis. Tilt, lift or hinge, No. 0, 

81 per doz.; (old Blast, *7 per doz.; dash- 
board, No. 0. So. To per dozen ; cold-blast 
dashboard, $9 per dozen. Extras are as 
follows : Japanning, 50c. per dozen ; cop- 
per plating cold blast, 8"2 per dozen. The 
prices quoted are f.o.b. London, Hamil- 
ilton, Toronto, Belleville, Kingston and 
Montreal. 

METALS. 

The. metal market has developed no 
striking feature during the week, unless it 
l>e the stronger position of copper. That 
market has been slowly gathering 
strength and emerging from the weak 
state which characterized it during the 
greater part of 1902. At present the price 
ol copper is firm and shows a tendency 
upwards. The change is likely due al- 
most wholly to speculative influences. 
Following the example set by American 
railroads the Canadian roads have advan- 
ced rates for transportation of iron pro- 
ducts from manufacturing points in Can- 
ada. The higher rates will be enforced 
on angle bars, bale ties, bolts, coil chain 
and cable, fish plates, galvanized and 
corrugated iron, iron and steel, bar, 
sheet, boiler, bundle or band, iron boiler 
inlns, iron pipe and fittings, pig iron, 
rivets, nails, screws, spikes, splice-bars, 
wire, wire rop-\. staples and tacks. The 
foreign markets report nothing of im- 
portance to this trade. 

BAR TRO.V — The movement in bar iron 
m id and has improved somewhat dur- 
ing the past few days. AYe quote as fol- 
lows : Merchants' bar, S"2 ; horseshoe iron, 
J2.25 : forged iron 82.20. 

BLACK SHEETS —The market remains 
unchanged with a fair movement. We 
quote : 28 gauge, $2.65 ; 26 gauge, 82.60 ; 
2m to 21 gauge, $2.50; 8 to 20 gauge. 
$2.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON.— No new feature 
i- imported in this market and the prices 
remain as last quoted. Our prices are 
as follows : No 2- Queen's Head, 84.40; 
Apollo. L0| oz . $4.30 ; Fleur de Lis, 
$4.15: Oomet, $4.10; "Bell" brand $4.05. 
For less than case lots 25c. extra is char- 
ged. 

I I. \lt PIPE The movement in 
pipe i- fair. Composition and waste 
quoted at Be. and ordinary at 7c. 
discount i- 'M \ per cent. 

[EON PIPE.— The market is quiet and 
the prices are firm. We quote as fol- 
lows: Standard pipe, per 100 feet, 
in lenjrths under I!' feet: Black, .{, 

82 10 '■■'. $2.65 : A. 82.85 ; f, $3.65 : I -in., 
S5.2D : \i. $7.35: H, $8.95: 2-in., $12.5S 
Galvanized, fr. 8:5.20: |, 83.15; ' . $3.85 
?. 85: l-in., $7.20: H. S1<V'5 : 1 .'., $12. 
20 : 2 inch, $16.85. Extra heavy pipe, 
plain ends, are quoted per 100 feet &< 
follows: Black. \, 84.20: ■} . 85.25. l-in.. 

5 I | 810.55 : U, 812.75 ; 2-in., $17. 
60. Galvanized, |, 85.20 . }, 86.65 : l-in.. 
$9.55: li, 813.25; 1*, $16; 2 in., 821.00. 



lead 
are 
The 



IMI 



IN F"l 

PROVIDENCE, R.I., U S.A. 



Cast Steel FILES and RASPS, High Grade 

FOR HOME AND EXPORT TRADE 

Largest File Manufacturers in the World ----, 

Seven Distinct Factories. 



The well-known " Nicholson " and " X. F." brands are made exclusively at 
our Providence works from best selected steel, by experienced workmen, 
and are exported to all parts of the globe, and command the highest prices. 



DOMINION WORKS 



F»ORT MOF>E, CANADA. 

Daily production : 6oo dozen, including " Globe," " Kearney & Foot," and other brands. 

Walter Grose* selling Agent. Montreal. 



THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Speoial Milled Work, Engine Studs. 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 








4ffi?E; fp*' s : 
















■m 1 


L I 




JsB - - 


1 




•■ jbEttttTm rt~ 


WMTWII 



Page Metal Ornamental Fence 

Handsome, durable and low-priced. Specially suitable for front 
and division fences in town lots, cemeteries, orchards, etc. Retails 
for 20 CENTS PER RUNNING FOOT. Just about 
the cheapest fence you can put up. Write for full particulars. 
$. Use Page Farm Fence and Poultry Netting. 

The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited, Walkerville. Ontario. 
Montreal, P.Q , and St. John, N B. 7 



SOLDER. 

Half-and-Half, Wire, Bar, Angle, and Plumbers- all grades. 
IF YOU USE, DROP US A LINE. 



THE CANADA METAL CO., 



WILLIAfl 
STREET, 



TORONTO. 



IF YOU WANT LIGHT AT SMALLEST COST 

Use "Brilliant" or "Radiant Shelby" Incandescent Lamps 

Special Prices to Large Lighting Companies. 
Walter Grose, Manufactured by 

Selling Agent, Montreal. The Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Canada. 



ASSISTANT WANTED. 

Bright young man with thorough knowledge 
of the hardware trade, and full of bright up-to-date 
ideas to a»s'st in the editorial department of Hakii- 
i AND METAL. State experience and present 
salary. Address Editor Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto or Montreal. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No. 14. 

Pullman Sash Bal. Co. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






Pot threads and couplings 5 per cent, is 
add ltd. 

TIM'l. \ I ES l hi re i- no i han, 
mention this week, both Local and i 
markel being quiet We quote I 

> I 25 and ehni • OaJ . I I 1 5 

soil PIPE »ND Mi DINGS Cban i 

nut much doing in iln- . in- , and wc 

quote tin- discount as. follow Ligki 

soil pipe, -i to inch, .')() pi-i .. -Hi., we- 
diuin and extra heuvy soil pipe, - to 6- 
ini-h, 60 i"i oant.j extra heavy .-.oil pipe, 

S inch, I.') |..-i .-.-lit.; light fittings, 2 in C> 
incli, ."ill and 10 pel .i-nt ; medium and 

extra heavy tittinos, 2 t.> t> inch, 00 per 
cent ; extra heavy fittings, B-inch, 45 per 
cent. 

PH3 LB/ON The markel quiet 

and the prieea nr.- -till quoted at £23.50 
in |2 1.50 ex -'"i i- Montreal. 

IM.nl OOPPEH. There is not much 

bul the uinrket is linn at *l'2.">ll 

i,. 113.60 per lOu M- 

INGOT TIN. There ie do change. We 
quote >-■: 60 to 828.50 per 100 Db 

PIG LEAD Business is quiet and the 
prices Bteady. In carlots the price is 
$2.90 and in small lots, 13.26 

STEEL. There have been a few ordere 
reported during the week, but prices re 
main about the -am.-. We quote as fol- 
low.: Sleighsboe, J2.10 to 12.20; tire, 
12.20 to $2.2o;*bar, 12.05; spring, 12.85 
to $3; reeled machinery, |2.75; toecalk, 
$2.60 to ¥2.90; machinery (iron finish), 
$2.10; mild Bteel, |2.05; Bquare harrow, 
12.15. 

POOL STEEL. Everything is quiet. 
Prices are as follows: Black Diamond, 8c; 
Sanderson's, s to I2c., according- to the 
grade ; Jessop's, 13c; Leonard's, 7£c ; 
.Jonas & Colver's, 10 to 20c; "Air Hard- 
ening," 65c. per lb. 

<\NAIl\ PLATES. The market is 
without feature. although galvanized 
plates have been moving freelv. I'ricos an- 
as follows: 52s, 82.70 to $2.80 ; 60s, 
52.85 to §2.90; 75s, S2.80 to S2.85; full 
polished. $3.75 and galvanized, $4.25 to 
$4.35 ; galvanized, 60s, $-1.45 to $4.55. 

TEKNE PLATES. These are slow. We 
quote s . 60 

COIL CHAIN rhere is more coil chain 
being sold at present than at any time 
during the past few yeare We quote as 
follow- No. 6, 10c; No. •">. '-».-.: \.. I. 
No 3, : 'hi li. . 6 16, 

5 16 exa< t, *5.25 ; . $4 30 . 7 L6, 
14.10 : f , |4; i- |3 " 

$3.60 ; I. $3 65 ; I in., $3.50. In carload 

lot- aii allow an- .- of 10c. i- made. 

SHEET ZINC. There is nothing doing 
We quote $5.50 to $5.75. 

\\IIMii\N Quiet at 10c. 

ZINC SPELTER Very few, in 
have been tie- order for the past couple 
of we.k- \\.- quote $5.25. 

SOLDER. Bar Bolder sell- at 20c. and 

wire -older at I8c, with a fairly good 
trad.- doing, 

SCRAP METALS. 

The Montreal dealers say* thej are re 
e.-i\ bag i- at present than the} 

are snipping, as all country dealers 
• •rally unload everything they have about 
the first of th. yeai The market is still 
Bteady and no immediate change in prices 
i- like!) to tak. place. Our quota 
tion- are now a- follow-: Beavy coppei 
and wire. 9c. per lb.; light copper, 8c. ; 
heavj red brass, 10c. : heavy yellow, 3 
light bra- ■ ad, 9 to -{■••; rij 

to -,•' . iron, No ' wrought, ^I'i to $1(5; 
No. 2, $7 per ton; machinery scrap. | 



The Popular Goods 
for Progressive People 



llll> I ok 

MLACTICAL HUH I ID I MDI kin-, i i i i \i n i 

Our Metallic 
Ceilings and Walls 

^iv.- tin- acme of -.m-i.i n ii 

> -.1 ln-t ii .is well ;i . pi Artistically beautiful 

destructible, sanitary, easily applied, and almost coin 
select among. 

There's big business In selling these goods are you ready for It I 

Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 



TORONTO. 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG. 



vi> 
\»/ 

I 



to S IT. jtove plat.-. S|,'5; malleable and 
steel, 86: mixed country rugs, 60 to 70c 
per 100 lb.; old rubbers, f>J| to 6Jc. per 
pound. 

RAW FURS. 

There are fair offerings of raw furs this 
week. The prices quoted here are about 
the average ami the correct market pri- 
ces, although on one or two lines it is 
reported that the quotations of some 
buyers are a little higher. The figures 
here given are from the largest deal. n 
who do not think the condition of the 
markel warrants anj advance. We quote: 



HIDES. 

Business 1 in hides it quiel and the prices 

remain tin- -nine a- a Week ago. I' 
follow . No I lii d No '-. • 

No. all -kins, S to 10c., and 

lambskins, 65c 

MUX 1 Rl \l \'H I s. 

I rope and lathyai n are each ^e. 
lower. 
A f.-w Line ol horse bits hu\ . 

■J."> per cent, 

\ .1- :lin< of I." per cent. I, 

place iii blacksmiths' stocks and dii 



i 

-.;..i 



BEAVEB Lebradoi and choici Eastern 

Territory Book; Mountain! and Weatern 

Strictly Prime, or, (fo l 

tly Prime, No. 1 

rjnpnme, No. 3 ... 3.00 

Flat, weak, or poor, >.r. N... 1 

Large 

1100 
1 

I I - 1 1 1 : It Eastern and far North-Beaten 
Territory i"" 1 u 

Large 
n and similar tin.- I.rijiht r«l kinda 1 00 

Territory and Western 

Value principally aa to beauty, ■ i" 1 " 

Sih,-i Eastern an.l fur Northern 
Pacific i oaat, Territorj and Weatern 



M< <li in Small 



i 00 
3.00 

n 



-.■..I 

100 



BE vi: Black Choice only 

Brown 



B \l»-l i: Of an lectiona 



Medi'm Bmall 
, 10 



!'o\ 



7.00 

a 

Brown 

Small 

Fair 
7.00 



3 

In 

i a 

1 v> 

■ 



SO 75 

HI 

I 

600 



- 



3 



I . 

1 • 



M 



4 
3 



IVW Far N'orth-Eaatern i • • 

Territory and w i-. 

Brown Pale 
\i\i:iin British Columbia, NorUiem Pariflc and atoilai • •• 17:. 

Territory and Weatern l " -"-' ■ 1 " l"i 

Quebec and Ontario i LOO 

H U in Small i 
MINK Halii LOO 3.35 

Territory an.l Weatern . I - 

I 
M I -KKAT Eastern, neat I irgi 

Territory and Westi rn 



3 
l 78 

4 

.30 
3 
1 JO 

• 

■ 

3 

3 

l 00 

-.'Small 



4 

4 

3 

4"l 









OTTF.K lj»l.r»<lor an.l far Nort 
territory A 



I Small 

1 Sins 11 



I 00 



3 



R M DON 

Black Valui 

-KI \K 



4 
» 






WOLVBRIN1 \ -lint to .Isri 

, v-loi:i i \i 



l>»rk i 












:; \ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

HARDWARE. 
Toronto, January 9, 1903 
U ' llll I orders from travellers, who 
\ \ started on the road last Hon 

day, are bat -tailing to couie 
in. the letter order busin — of the past 
week has been ->• large and so satisfac 
t.'iy that the opinion is generallj ex 
pressed by all jobbers thai the outlook 
lor 1903 i- even more promising than was 
the case a year ago. Generally speak- 
ing the market is steady, with iron and 
steel lines stiffening, bfope.is fluctuating, 
the tendency being downward. A decline 
of \< . iii sisal i- i eported. 

BARB U IRE. Tins market is dull and 
featureless. We quote the base price 
as follow-: 52.674 from Cleveland, and 
!2Ac less in car lots. From stork, To 
ronto, s:j. 

GALA LN1ZED WIRE.- -There is aoth 
ig doing. Prices arc unchanged. Our 
quotations are as follows: Nos. 0.7 and 8, 
$3.15 to 53.36 per 100 lb.; No. 9, 32.05 
to 52.85; No. |o. S3. 20 to S3.40; No. II. 
s;*.v>;, tu 53 15; No. 12, 82.80 to 33; No. 
13, 52.90 to 8:5.10; No. 14, 83.75 to 83.03: 
No. 15, 54.30; No. 16, 84.55. Nos. G to 9 
base from Cleveland are quoted at 82.27 A 
in less than carlots. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE:— There is not 
much demand. The prices are steady 
this week. We quote the base price 
as follow- : 52.50 per 100 It). Oiling, 
in»-. : nqipering, 00c. and tinning, $2 pet 
Phi Ih extra. Shipping points, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Montreal, with 
Freights equalized on those points. 

WIRE NAILS.— The demand is picking 
up. Price- are unaltered. We quote as 
follows : 52.45 per keg and 5c. less for 
carlots. The shipping points are To 
ronto, Hamilton, London, Gananoque and 
Montreal. 

CUT NAILS. There is nothing doing. 

\\.- quote 52.50 per keg. 

HORSE NAILS. Prices are unchanged. 
Disc (Hints are as follows: "C" brand, oval 
head, Ih and In and 7.\ per cent.; on 
"M" brand, 50, 10 and 5 per cent.; on 
"Monarch." 0."> per cent., and "Counter- 
sunk" head, 65 per cent.; "Peerless," 50 
and 7 \ per cent. 

HORSESHOES. Trade is dull, and 
price- are unchanged. (Quotations are as 
follow-: Iron shoes, No. 2 and larger, light 
medium and heavy, 83.45 ; snow shoes, 
53.70 ; lierht steel shoes, 83.55 ; feather 
weight i all sizes), 54.95; iron shoes, No. 
I and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all sizes), 8:5.70; snow shoes, 34; light 
steel shoes, S3. s0 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), 54-95. 

S( EtEWS. A fair sorting trade is to 
be- notc-d Prices are steady. We quote as 
follow-: Flat head bright, S 7.J> and 10 
per cent, discount; round head bright, 
B24 "'"' I" l' er cent.; flat head brass, 80 
and 10 per cent.; round head brass, 75 
and IH per cent.; round head bronze, 65 
per cent, and flat head bronze, 70 per 
cent. 

RIVETS VND I'd RRS.— There 
change in the conditions. Quotations 
are as follows : Iron rivets, 60 and 10 per 
cent, discount ; iron burrs, 55 per cent. ; 
copper rivets, with usual proportion of 
burrs. 45 per cent. ; copper burrs nlone, 
30 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS. The market i 
ported quiet. Quotations are as follows : 
Carriage bolts, common (31 list), 50 per 



cent.; manage bolts, full square (52 10 
list), 55 and 10 per cent.; carriage boil-. 
Norway iron (53.00 list), 55 and 10 pei 
cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 50 and 10 
,h screws, cone points, 66 

2-3 and In pet cent.; elevator shaft and 

whiflietree bolts, 60 per cent. 

SPADES \ND SHOVELS.— A more ac- 
tive demand is repdrted. 'The discount is 

now 15 per cent., and the list price lias 
been reduced 53 per dozen for Olds' goods. 

52 for Gray's, and 51 for Burns'. 

ROPE.- Sisal is jc . cheaper. The mar 
ket has fluctuated materially of late, the 
general tendency being downward. We 

quote : Pure nianula. 1 Ic.J British man 
ila. 12c; sisal, lie.; lathvarn, single, 
lie. and double. I Lie; sisal bed cord, 3- 
eord. 48 feet. 66e.; 60 fe-t, 80c.; 72 feet, 
96c. per doe. 

II \KYEST 'TOOLS. -Business is being 
booked for spring delivery in satisfactory 
volume. The discount is quoted at GO 
and In per cent. 

LAWN MOWERS— There is nothing 
moving, but orders are coming in nicely 
for spring delivery. Our quotations 
are as follows : Woodyatt, 12-in. wheels, 
87.50 ; Star, 12-inch wheels, 85.50 ; Daisy, 
12-inch wheels, 84.90; Philadelphia, 10- 
inch wheels, 36 ; Ontario, 10-inch wheels, 
sl2.7.">. The other prices are in propor- 
tion. 

CUTLERY. — While the movement is as 
yet comparatively light, the manufactur- 
ers, both in Canada and Europe, are kept 
busy and prices tire lirm. 

BUILDING PAPER.— Last week's ad- 
vance is well maintained. We quote: Dry 
sheathing, grey or straw, 35c. per roll ; 
tar sheathing, grey or straw, 45c. per 
roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll; tarred fibre, 
60c. per roll. 

TINWARE AND ENAMELLED WARE. 
— There is a good movement of milk-can 
trimmings, but the general trade is mode- 
rate. 

STOVES AND RANGES.— No trade is 
doing, but the manufacturers are prepar- 
ing for another big year's business. 

RANGE BOILERS.— A net price is now 
given for galvanized iron-range boilers, 
all makes. The quotations follow : 18 
and .'50 gallon, SO; .'55 gallon, 37; 40 gal- 
lon, 58; 52 gallon, §12.50; 03 gallon, 819; 
82 gallon, 523; 100 gallon, 831, and 120 
gallon, 337. 

SCREEN DOORS.— The demand is nor- 
mal. We quote : Screen doors, common, 
two or three panel, walnut stained, 3-in. 
style, §0.00; stained, yellow or green, 
80.80; in natural colors, oil finish, 88.15; 
1-in. style, 20c. per dozen extra. 

CEMENT.— Trade is not expected to 
open up before February. 'The prices are 
nominal. We quote: Canadian Portland. 
52.80 to 53.20; hydraulic, 81.35 per bar 
rel. At the works the prices are 82.50 to 
52.70 per barrel. 

METALS. 

A normal movement is reported, with 
prices firm all along-the line. Ingot cop 
per is ,',c. higher. Other lines bear no 
change 

PIG [RON. There is no Canadian pig 
iron offering. Sonic Scotch and English 
iron has been quoted here at figures 
varying from 521.00 to 523.50 per 

ton. though so No. I English is being 

Bold at 524, when it can be had. Prices 

as follows : |23 to 825 for No. ] and 

522.50 for No. 2 at the Canadian fur- 

2 Summerlee is quoted at 325 

on track, Toronto. 



STEEL BOILER PLATES.— We quote 
52 per 100 lb. at Pittsburg. 

TOOL STEEL.— The market is stiff, 
and our prices this week are as follows: 
" B C " and "Black Diamond," 10 to 
lie; .le-sop's, 'Morton's and Firth's, 
lie; Jonas ..V Oolver's, 10 to 20c. ; ditto, 
"Air Hardening," 70c. per lb. : Chas. 
Leonard'-. Se to 0c. ; Park's "Silver," 12 
to lie. ; Bark's Special," I") to 20c. 

MILD STEEL.— The demand at present 
is a little quiet, but the prices are liriniy 
maintained. We quote 31.00 per 100 It). 
at Pittsburg and 82.75 per 100 lb. on 
track, 'Toronto. 

SPRING STEEL.— The demand is nor- 
mal, but the mills are still behind their 

orders. \\f quote 53.50 per 100 lb. Oil 
1 rack, Toronto. 
BOILER TUBES. These are unchanged. 
BAR I BON. -Trade in bar iron has un- 
proved. The market is firm. We quote base 
price: 82.05. Extras cut to length while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c. per 100 lb., 
1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15e; under 1 ft., 
20e; over 20 ft. by special agreement, 
according to length and size. 

BLACK SHEETS.— These are nuiet and 
unchanged. We quote : Common, 83.15 for 
28 gauge and dead flat, 82.50 for 2(i 
gauge. 

CANADA PLATES— A moderate de- 
mand is noted. We quote as follows : 
All dull, 82.90 to 83; half-polished, 82.85 
to 83.10 and all-bright, 83.75 to 83.85. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS.— The market 
continues unchanged, and quotations are : 
Queen's Head, 84.50 for 28 gauge; Amer- 
ican, 81.10 for 24 gauge; Bell brand, 
81.3H for 2S gauge; Gordon Crown, 54.50 
for 28 gauge. 

TIN. — The market has gained strength 
and activity. We quote 820 to 830 per 
100 lb. % 

'TIN PLATES. — Considerable business is 
being done for forward delivery. It looks 
as if prices had touched bottom, and 
some claim that higher prices will be 
reached. We quote as follows : Char- 
coals, 84.75 to 85, and cokes, 34.25 to 
54.50 per box. 

COPPFZR.— More activity is reported 
and an advance of 50c. per 100 lb. in in- 
got is noted. Our quotations are as fol- 
lows : Ingot copper, 813 ; sheet copper, 
822 to 823 per 100 lb. 

BRASS.— The demand is light. The dis- 
count is 15 per cent. 

LEAD. — The market is stronger, and the 
prices are unchanged at 83.50 per 100 lb. 
for pig lead, and 83.75 for bar lead. 

IRON PIPE.— Not much doing. The 
price per 100 feet is as follows : Black 
pipe, i in., 33; Jin., 82.30 to 32.40; gin., 
52.65; •'. in., 82.85; i'-in.. 53.65; 1-in., 
55.20; I J in., 87.35; H-in., 88.95; 2-in., 
si 2.:.:.; 2.', in., 820 to 821; 3-in., 824 to 
525; 3.1 in., 830 to 332; 4-in., 837.50 to 
838. 

ZINC SPELTER.— This metal continues 
inactive. 'The price is 5 to tie. per lb. 

ZINC SHEETS.— A fair amount of busi- N 
ness has been transacted in this line. We 
ipiote the base price: Cask lots, 80 to 
56.25 and part casks, 56.25 to 86.50. 

SOLDER. The market is improved over 
a week ago. and further activity is look- 
ed for. 

ANTIMONY. Business is fair. The price 
is steady at 80 per ton. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

HIDES.— The quality of hides is poor 
and the prices have declined £c. Prices 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






are as follow- \.. I N T o. 2 

green, »'>V.; No. 1 , Ho 

7. ■ hi.-. i. 8c. pei li> 
( LLF skins rn.. an nominal and 
basinet i i quiei Qqi itations ai 

-kins. (1 lo II lb. inclusive. No. I, 10c 

\.. 2, Bo.; do, IJ to 2n lli iacluaive, No. 

I. '.!<■.; No. '2, 7.-.; .l<-nr..iis l.lmiics), (in 

to 7n,-. m. I. 
SHEEPSKINS These an- in -.'."I de 

man. I We i|U"t>- 75 I" 86c 

WOOL Tin-- markel oontinui 
ami unchanged, Quotations air as fol 
low-. I n washed wool. B t" BJc fleece 
wool; l"" ; pulled wool mper, 16 to 10c 
und extra, 19 to 20c 

l \ II 1 1\\ rhere has been a decline "i 
U We quote i»'i lb., on traok, 

Poronto, ami ii| to ftyc. out of store 

SEEDS. 

lli.' business thai is being transacted 
in seeds is quiet. There >> a Intl.. al 
sikr offering at |G ■■> per bushel 

Knl clover i- in limited supply at - 
>><i. •_'."> per bushel for prime to choice 
Timothy is quoted at $1.60 to 11.80 i- i 
bushel. 

PETROLEUM. 

The markel is firm with a good trade 
doing. The I niorj Petroleum Co.'s i 
are unchanged tins week. Prices follow 
Lily White, Canadian, ITA-. in l>l>ls.; Sil 
ver Light, ajnerican, I'.'A.-. in bbls.; I 
tal Spray, water white, American, 204c. 
in Mils ; Pennoline, besl American im- 
ported, 22c. in bbls. In bulk, 2.-. less. The 
Queen City oil Company quote a- fol 
lows: Sarnia Prime White, IT. 1 ,.-; Sarnia 
Water White, L9*c. ; rfamilj Safety, 20c. 
in bbls.; Pratt's At-tral, 19^0. in bulk. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

I'riiTs air firm and a good movement 
i- reported, Our quotations are as fol 

l,.w> Beavj copper and wire, 10c. per 
tb.; light copper, 8 to 84c; heavy red 
l>rus>. 94c.; heavy yellow brass, 8 to SJc; 
light brass. 5 to S^c; lead, 2 to 2£c. ; 
scrap zinc 3c; iron, No. 1 wrought, $13 
per net ton; No. 2 wrought, §4.50; ma- 
ehinery cast scrap, §15.50 to 816; stovi> 
plate, $10; malleable and steel, 86 to 
86.50; old rubbers, 64c. per tb. and coun- 
try mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax, January 5, 1903 

A MEW year lias been ushered in 
daring the last week an. I the 
hardware merchants, in common 
with other business men. express them 

selves as more than satisfied with the 

pafri year's business, both as to volume 
ami to trade conditions generally. \ 
have entered on the new yenr w 

hopeful feeling that the buoyant ,'Oivl; 

tions prevailing now s,, largely for the 
lael two years -will continue through 

1903. Their hope-, too. in to be well 

grounded, a- most encouraging reports 

have come in from all parts of the Mali 
time Provinces, all telling of works plan 
neil or in progress, which will tend to en 
large trade This is indeed a growing 
ami expanding period. The money which 
the farmer anil the artisan are not hoard 
ine. up in " the old -locking "- 
former years, but are s|»-n<linij in im 



|,i o\ .ni. nt ..I enlui -j. in. hi . 1 thus help 
ing trade generally. 



Dm 1 1 1 :_; t In- la t week tin- hai dwai •- I 
ha n.'t iiien ex ten ive, but there 1^ al 

em hi.' h in -el. 1 1 ■ 1 in.- 1 1. I.. • -p e\ '-i y • 
one busy. I p to New N eai ■ « e the 1 •• 
tailei - m ere \ ei \ bus) , and 1 ep >i t a 

In-av \ Inn. in both I lii 1 I ma ali'l 

New Year's g 1 The trade in cutler) 

ami in silverware and fine kitchen fui 
nishings, which m.w run largely in the 

hardware trade was especial!) good, and 

al .. 111 l.ii. led etc. 

Tra\ ell. 1 - a oil on I In- 1 1 ..id 01 

orting up samples preparatory to 
taking then i ■< dei f< »i i n ing I hi 
starting oul with ever; prospecl of doing 

od 11 a< le l he heai Is of the lii ni- 
di figuring 01 verifying ledgej bal 
ances, which, in nearly every instance, 
are quite satisfactory • onsiderable i .in 

meats are d luring the nexl few days, 

ami these will give a g I idea ol what 

trade has been during the holidaj 
son throughout the country, ami all hope 
that these payments maj be a 
im \ .1 - in the past . -I. that t he yeai maj 
open with a clean sheet 
• • • 

No year in the past has Bhown such a 
volume of business us 1902 in the line of 
builders' hardware, and then i- promise 
of much in thi- line in the present yeai 
Locally, the demand has been large. Djur 
i:ie, the pasl yeai ISO new houei 
buildings were erected, or the construe 
tion begun, while man] others have on 
ne extent ive i opaire The new Cus 
toms building was also begun, and very 
extensive repairs and alteration- were 
made at the North Street Station, a nd a 
large extension to the Blind Asylum was 
begun late in the yeai V new school 
on Quinpool Road is also under 

construction. so thai work in this line 
and the consequent demand for material- 
is good. The weather has been bo mild 

that building operations have hardly been 

interrupted, and may no! be Eoi some 
time. Extensive building operations have 
been general throughout the Province, 
and considerable is -till going on. 

• • • 
Price conditions in hardware remain 
practically unchanged so far a- the 
market i- concerned. There is now 
every inducement for the jobber and the 
retailer to buy as there is little indi.a 
tion of any relaxation in the generally 
firm pric-. especially in iron and 



The officers of The Maritime Hardware 

Company met representatives of the wire 
nail manufacturers in St. John on the 
28th ult. Some time ago the latt< 
duced the price of then product, and it is 

understood that the former wish to have 
the prices, s,, far as they are concerned, 
remain the -ame They claim that form 
erly they were not receiving as much 
profit on wire nail- as the business de 
mands. The result of their deliberations 
has not yet been given out. 
• • • 

• The export- from Halifax for the week 

ending January '.. amounted to $127,350, 
apportioned as follow- \\,,.t Indie-, si;,. 
560 . Great Britain, 136,892 ; I 
Stat- I . South America, 116,485 ; 

South Africa, 11,116; Newfoundland, 
17,463. 

K. C H 



OAKEY'S 



paration f. . llrr> 

6d. and i». CaoUlen 



WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

HAmrtiTi'HiHfl or 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN PORMAN, 644 Cralgr Street 

MONTItKAl, 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

Wtit Troy, N.Y 
Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacki 

Harne** Snap*, Chain, Rope and Web 
Good*, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBEKS ATMFHS. PIICBS. 



PRINT'S CLIPPERS 

(VtV t "'!^-^X/Z Toil*, Hand J.lrrtnr Pew. 

'are the best, 

HifhMt <4uAlur (, rooming and 
t l b« t t i -ShAarmt M^hl.^ 

WE MAKE THEM 

BIND Vt>E liTAI^Otri TO 




V 



Aattrtaaa Sa«arw Mf(. C»., lulu I.B..CU 



The Best Door Closer Is . . . 
NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FL00B 8PBIN0 

Will cliise a iloor -i 1 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 \ lu-utii-t MQ l-i- 

vin.l, lias many working advanta^*"* OTet tbe 

ordinary ■prtog-, and lias [«!<■•• the iM-iir, Inn* 

throughout Ureal Britain and the Ootoml** Olraa 

perfecl satisfaction. Made only by 

w. NEWMAN & 80NS, 
Hospital st . - HIK.MINi.il \M 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES. SNAPS, etc.. etc.. 

In all slr.es and styles. May be bad oial! 
Jobbers t br.ni <huul Canada, 

Factory— NIAOABA FALLS. OUT 



STANDARD. 

The cost of Axes 
per million feet of 
lumber taken out 
should be the best 
Standard. L'nder 
this Standard the 
Crown Jewel is 
the cheapest 
in the market. 

Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W.L. Haldimand, Jr., Eastern Afaot, Mooucal. 







CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



COMMERCE AND EDUCATION. 



IN new o( the attention that i- being 
increasingly paid to commercial edu- 
cation, especially in England, Germanj , 
and America, it seems not improbable that 
a few years will witness the introduction 
of business courses into all the more im- 
portant colleges and universities in these 
countries. Naturally this movement has 

come from ont>ide. Educational institu- 
tions, as at present constituted, have little 
in common with the world o( business. 
It is the business men who have realized 
the advantages which well-organized col- 
i- places of instruction, and 
who have come forward and adapted these 
advantages to their own purposes. 

The struggle for commercial supremacy 
ha-- yearly been becoming keener. At first 
business was practically chance work. 
Then knowledge o( goods and methods 
became necessary. Finally, ability has 
had to be fostered by general and sys- 
tematic training, and local knowledge has 
had to be supplemented by an acquaintance 
with the general commercial structure of 
the business world. Intact, higher com- 
mercial education has been rendered 
necessary in order to meet the require- 
ments of the times. 

This march o( progress is readily fol- 
lowed. The teaching of an elementary 
business course has been for some time 
carried on in our secondary schools and a 
more thorough practical training has been 
afforded in the so-called business colleges. 
These courses have turned out good, 
practical business men with a sound 
knowledge of correct methods. But they 
have fallen short in another direction. 
They have failed to afford an acquaintance 
with the great underlying principles of the 
structure and organization of modern in- 
dustry and commerce. 

Naturally, this training cannot be sup- 
plied adequately in secondary schools. It 
is the work- -of special colleges and of 
universities, and the time is now ripe for 
the development of commercial courses in 
these institutions. 

Commercial undertakings are conducted 
on a far larger scale to-day than ever be- 
fore, and it has become more and more 
necessary for their promoters to be 
thoroughlv grounded in the economic 
principles underlying them. This shuiild 
be the main work of those higher institu- 
tions. 

A valuable example o( the practical ap- 
plication of these theories is afforded by 
the London School of Economics and 
Political Science, which was founded in 
1895. Prior to that date commercial edu- 



cation of a universitj type was .in unknown 
quantity in England. It is true the 
older universities did afford a training in 
economics and political science, but it was 
for no commercial purpose. Their object 
in imparting a knowledge of these subjects 
was purely academic and in the interests 
o( learning in general. 

On the continent, French students were 
able to secure higher commercial training 
at L'Ecole Libre des Science Politiques, 
and in Austria, Germany and the United 
States, man\ of the universities devoted 
considerable attention to it. Indeed, 
definite commercial courses were estab- 
lished at many of these institutions. 

From the standpoint of industrial train- 
ing, greater progress had been made. 
Already numerous highly-endowed techno- 
logical institutions had been established. 
In fact, the laborer was in a far better 
position to improve his technical know- 
edge than the director of that labor was 
to better his hold on the commercial world. 
If the laborer and director of labor were to 
continue relatively on an equal footing of 
development, something would have to be 
done to provide the latter with means to 
improve his position. To meet this end 
the London School of Economics was 
established. 

When it was first organized, the London 
School of Economics had little if any con- 
nection with the University of London. 
The arrangement under which it became 
the commercial faculty of the university is 
of a very recent date. Accordingly, up to 
a short time ago, no degrees could be 
granted to students who passed through 
the School. The unfairness of this is 
apparent. Many students undertook "a 
severe course of training, sacrificed their 
leisure and involved themselves in con- 
siderable expense in order to attend egu- 
larlv the lectures and classes at the School; 
but at the end of their course they have 
had no certificate, diploma or degree, 
which they could produce as evidence of 
their attainments." Under the new regime 
they will receive degrees in science from 
the University of London (B. Sc. and D.Sc, ) 
The School was and still is fostered by 
the Technical Education Board of the 
London County Council. During its first 
year the Hoard granted it ^£.'o00. Next 
year this sum was increased to ^,1,200 
and now, under the new arrangement, 
£2, 500 o( the ;£l0,000 granted to the 
University, goes to the School of 
Economics. In May of last year a hand- 
some new building was formally opened 
by Lord Roscbery, Chancellor of the 



University and President of the School. 
Since 1895 over 1,500 students have 
attended the School, and last session 540 
were enrolled on the books. Of these 
over K0 per cent, were drawn from the 
professional and business classes. A 
certain number attended from the colonies 
and the United States. About a quarter 
of the total number were .University 
graduates. 

Mr. \V. A. S. Hewins, Director of the 
School, writing in The Young Man, ex- 
plains how the programme of work is 
arranged': "The lectures and classes at 
the School have been arranged with a 
view to the needs of particular callings. 
It has been found by experience that a 
basis of sound scientific training is 
required for successful work in any of the 
special departments of the School, such 
as railway administration or banking. 
Students in these and similar departments 
are therefore encouraged in every way r to 
attend the established courses of the 
School which deal with such subjects as 
the following : 

"1. The general structure of modern 
business and the general features of 
modern, industrial and commercial or- 
ganization. 

" 2. Explanation of the terms in ordin- 
ary use in the discussion of economic, 
social and commercial problems, together 
with the leading principles of economic 
science. 

" 3. The methods of statistics, with 
special reference to trade and commerce, 
imports and exports, or administration. 

" 4. Economic and commercial geo- 
graphy. 

"5. Economic and commercial history. 

" 6. Commercial and industrial law. 

" The choice of special subjects is made 
with reference to the objects which the 
students have in view, the profession or 
calling in connection with which they 
desire to avail themselves of the scientific 
training provided by the school. It may- 
be mentioned by way of illustration that 
the railway courses, in addition to those 
enumerated above, include the following : 

" L The economics of railway adminis- 
tration ; the basis of rates ; meaning of 
the phrase ' cost of carriage ' ; how rates 
are fixed ; the relations between the rail- 
ways and the Government in different 
countries ; English, French and American 
systems, etc. 

"2. The development of the means of 
transport, with special reference t« rail- 
ways. 

" 3. Special railway problems. 

" 4. Engineering questions in relation to 
railway administration. 

"5. The law of transport." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






The example ol London has been fol« 
lowed recentl} ki Manchester, where, n a 
meeting ol merchants, presided ovei bj 
i lit- Lord Mayor, it was resolved to form ;i 
committee to establish a fund sufficient to 
\ iild l ,/...">i mi .1 \i-.u i,.i in years to sup- 
port .1 faculty of commerce in the Univer- 
ritj i'i Mam hestei . 

In Canada, oui own Universitj of 
Toronto has bean making an effort to pro 
\ ido higher commercial education. Foi 
some time the Political Science course in 
tli.it institution has been giving a practical 
turn u> its ii-.i, hing, and during the session 
of L901-1U02 a regulai commercial course 
w a-- instituted. 



NEW WHOLESALE HOUSE FOR 
TORONTO. 

TORONTO is to have a new wholesale 
I hardware bouse. The style o\ the 
firm will ho The Kenned) Hardware 
Co., Limited, and a charter has been ap- 
plied for. 

The directors of the now company are 
S. R. Kennedy (president), J. J. Maclen- 
nan (vice-president), A. I». Cunningham 

and T. G. Scott. 

The capital sto< k will be -Sinn, 

S. R. Kennedy, the president of the now 
company, has been in the hardware busi- 
ness about :.".! years, -2\ years of which 
were spent on the mad travelling for such 
nouses as M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & 
Co.; II. S. I low land, Sons & Co., Limited, 
and Lewis Bros. & Co., Limited. He has 
just severed his connection with the last- 
named firm. 

The building at No. lit Colborne street, 
occupied bj T. Wallbridge & Co., has 
boon leased by the now firm, and posses- 
sion will be taken about January 15. 
Travellers will be on the road about 
March I. 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP 



TM 



PRESIDENT SCHWAB WANTS HIS 
SHARE. 

President Schwab of the United States 
Steel Corporation, according to hU secre- 
tary, Mr. Wrenn, has cabled that he de- 
sires to subscribe for the maximum number 
of shares he is entitled to under the em- 
ployes' profit-sharing plan. He will gel 
* tin shares. 

Mr. Schwab is now a large owner of 
both the preferred and common stocks of 
the Stool Trust. In his affidavit lilod in the 
suits brought to restrain the stock conver- 
sion plan he swore thai he had sold bonds 
oi the corporation to invest the proceeds in 
the. common stock. Now York Journal of 
Commerce. 



T 

pan] . w hi' h ha ' n i uni 

last Ool bow 160 men "i. 

it tuiT. and ■''•"" t t twine in n 

for next trade It i ex| 

that the ~inif will !"• ui'if.i e. i tn 200 
hand 

iwel, Onl . Iiai \ i I in ln\ •■! . .1 

taking over the local electric light and 
n atei « i u s 

Port Bope, Ont., voted 110,1 for the 

a tablishmenl of The Standard [deal 
Sanitary Companj 'a w 

1 1"- 8t l aw rence Light . Beat and 
Power Company, Three Ki- . are 

applying tor incorporation. 

1 roderich, Onl . has carried t hree 
laws, pnblic library, mill exemption, and 
knitting factory exempt 

I he Bumber Power and Light Com 
pany, Limited, lias been authorized to 

increa ipital from 150,000 to tl00, 

nun 

\ delegation from British Columbia will 
wait on the Federal Government on the 
15th inSt., to aalj tor an increase of duty 
on lead and lead products 

Belleville, Out., voted on Monday in 
favor of a bonus f o Kirkwood & SffcKin 

non. who will operate the iron and Bteel 
rolling milU at thai place. 

Dunnville, Ont., lias voted in favor of 

loaning 115,000 to J D Pennington, of 

Dundas, Ont., who is (,, start a refri<_ r 

erator and woodworking factory, employ- 

• er 60 hands. 

Waterloo, Ont., has voted in favor oi a 
bj law to ji.int Schierholtz & Co. a loan 
of 15,000, a free si to. and ta\ exemption 
tor ten years, bo .ho latter will now build 
large upholstering and frame factories. 

The Empire Limestone Company, ol 
York, i- authorized to embark in the 

cement and stone business i n Ontario, 
with a capital of 1600,000 William M 
German, Ml'. of Wlland. is appointed 

the company's attorney for Ontario. 

Collingwood, Ont., carried the county 
good roads hv law ; n by law to grant a 
bonus of $25,000 to the wire and nail fac- 
tory : a by law to buy tor 126,000 the 
Toner & G ill property, and a by 

law to expend money to improve the 
harbor. 

I t" 
construct and operate a Inr^e pulj 



hi tlu< di net havi 

il ni i a' t f ■ • i i he build 

homa P dam 

willi Ii, and i ■ 

\ a < M taw a di i hat much in 

t Ii i <■ in 1 1,., anm >um ement 
that the Canada Atlantic U 
extend it line and in 

that Mi Cloi 
in the exten the ' \ B 

opening to his wo I that he 

hind the proposition t" build the line 
which will connei 
directly with the Western trade 

I- II Clei • mi tn be much 

affected by thi nxiety 

ling the works be has orgaaizi 
Sault St Harit Out Be i de the fol 
lowing statement on Honda} I 

branch of the works will be pt 

ward to Completion a- rapidly • 
ble. Thirty million dollai 

capital hi tmk in the t 

and 1 am confident that not a single dol 
lar will be losl Die worki arc now in 
-ii.), a position that with or without me 
they will work themselves out." 

\ ihai t.i be i anted |,\ the Ont 

ario Government authorizii Belle 

ville Portland Cement Company, l.im 
ited, to engage in all the various lines 
of I'u onnocted with the manufac 

ture of Portland cement, with a 
capital of 82 The provi 

directors of the companj I lericV 

Reillej . II M Mm ton, U .1 Philli] 
Sweetman, and T Croucher, all ol 

■onto I he company will i .,, ,. v 

tensive marl deposit'' ii tl m t 

11 tings, and have n, hi 

Belleville. 

The Vulcan Iron Woi I 

incorporation as The Vulcan Iron Works 
Company, Limited, Wint 

• 0.000 



TENCES 

and GATES 

IN WIRE AND IRON. 

■n furnish anything required, from a plain 
wire fence for the farm to an on> 
residence or public buildin il prices to 

hardware trade. Send for catalognu 

The Dennis Wire and Iron Co., 

'.DON. ONT 



38 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




HEATING AND VENTILATION. 

V MODEL system of heating and van 
Illation luis been adopted in 
new 1 1 i •_■ 1 1 m iiool building at Woi 
cester, Mass. The building i- warmed by 
hot water under a forced circulation, of 
the direct radiation class, with the ait 
supplied t«>i ventilation only. The build 
storej and basement struc- 
ture, l"'. 1 x lot") feet in plan, and contains 
•!T rooms, exclusive of a large assembly 
room and the basement. It has six 
entrain.-, four giving access to both the 
basement and the Grst floor. The base- 
ment rooms are occupied only for short 
periods and are not provided with spe- 
cial means for ventilation, except the 
main lavatories, from which separate 
vent passages are furnished to prevent a 
diffusion of the air from those rooms in- 
to the rest of the building. The appar- 
atus for heating and ventilation has been 
located in the centre of the basement. 
The ventilating system lias been designed 
to supply and exhaust about 40,300 rubic 
feet of air per minute. The total num- 
ber of seats in the school rooms is 1,240, 
so that the per capita supply of air on 
this basis is about 32.5 cubic feet of air 
per minute. 2.5 cubic feet above the State 
requirement. In the case of the assem- 
bly hall air is delivered through eighl 
fresh air openings, aggregating 48 square 
feel in gross area ; with a velocity of 
I "i i feet per minute through the open- 
on the basis of the gross area scale, 
32 cubic feet of air can be supplied per 
minute per person, with 600 people in 
attendance. This means with 1,200 peo- 
ple, the full capacity of the hall, that 15 
cubic feet are delivered per capita per 
minute. On account of the short periods 
of occupancy, it was not considered justi- 
fiable to make provision for greater air- 
supply. 

The air for the ventilating system is 
received through basement windows in the 
front of the building into a cold - air 
chamber walled off from the girl's recrea- 
tion room, and is then carried in an un- 
derground passage to the tempering 
chamber. From the tempering stacks 
n i- received by the blower and then dis 
charged through a system of duets and 
flues to the openings in the rooms. The 
tempering surface consists of indirect 
radiators supported in two tiers on the 
irons and pipe standards, comprising al- 
ther I 'J -tacks of "- each, 

and aggregating 1,320 square feel \s the 
blower is designed to handle 40,330 cubic 



feet oi air per minute, 560 cubic feet of 
air are passed per hour per square foot 
of the tempering stacks.— Engineering 
Record. 

BRISK BUILDING YEAR IN TORONTO 

While not yet up to the most active 
year in the " boom " days, the past 
year has been one of unusual activity in 
Toronto building circles. The permits is- 
sued during the year total up to $3,834,- 
923, against $3.56S.f583 in 1901, when the 
permit for the S5l.O0O.OO0 King Edward 
Hotel was taken out. This makes a re- 
cord figure, except in 189], when permits 
for the new city hail were issued. Every- 
thing considered, it is fair to infer from 
the returns that there was more building- 
done in Toronto during 1902 than in any 
other year of the city's history. And, as 
the demand for good plumbing work is 
steadily growing, the cause of the brisk 
plumbing season is not hard to discover. 

BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 

QUEBEC. 

G. Matte, for a brick building, to cost 
$2,500. 

LONDON. 

The first building permit of the year 
was issued Saturday to H. C. McBride, 
architect. It was for alterations to three 
stores, the property of Mrs. H. R. Ives, 
of Montreal, and situated on the south 
side of Dundas street, near Richmond 
street. 

MONTREAL. 

W. J. McGuire \s Company, plumbers, 
etc., etc., Montreal, have 15 contracts un- 
der way at present. 

Ballantyne & Co., St. Antoine street, 
Montreal, report the jobbing trade brisk, 
but as regards new contracts, they are 
exceptionally quiet at present. 
TORONTO: 

1). Schwalm, pair of dwellings at 170 
and ITS Ossington avenue, to cost $4,000. 

Charles Delaney, factory, near King 
street, to cost 81,200; W. F. Petry, 
buildei 

Lcme Loan and Savings Company, for 
dwellings at 191 and 'Jul Shaw street, to 
... i |10,800. 

W. A. Clark, dwelling, near Dupont 
street, on Walmer Road, to cost $2,800; 
u McBean, architect. 

Metropolitan Bank, for alterations to 

building, corner of Bathurst and College 
treets, to cosl $1,500; Dai ling and Pear- 
son, architects. 



BUILDING NOTES. 

A PROJECT is under way to erect 
a hotel in Montreal, at a cost 
of $1,500,000. 
Beaverton, Ont., has voted in favor of 
a new town hall. 

About $2,500 is to be spent on a new 
bridge in New Hamburg, Ont. 

A 75-ft. addition is to be built to the 
Owen Sound, Out., freight sheds. 

A new locomotive works will be built at 
Longue Point, which will employ 600 men 
and turn out 100 engines annually. 

Lord Strathcona has offered to give 
$20,000 towards the construction of a 
$100,000 gymnasium at McGill Univer- 
sity. 

The plans for the Victoria Hotel, Que- 
bec, prepared by J. R. Resther & Son, 
architects, Montreal, call for a $150,000 
building. 

The Montreal Amateur Athletic Asso- 
ciation will build a new club house in the 
spring on Peel street. It will be 175 by 
133 feet, and will be complete in every 
respect. 

W. & D. Stewart have completed plans 
for 40 new houses to be erected about the 
new Deering Works near Hamilton. All 
will have bathrooms and other modern 
improvements. 

The plans for permanent freight sheds 
on the wharves at Montreal were con- 
sidered by John Kennedy, harbor en- 
gineer, and the transportation repre- 
sentatives. The plans, from railway and 
steamship standpoints, were considered 
satisfactory. 

During 1902 there were 727 dwellings, 
30 stores, 13 warehouses, 27 factories, 
seven churches, two educational institu- 
tions and one hospital erected in Mont- 
real at a cost of $2,604,147. In repairs 
and alterations $425,587 was expended, 
making a total of $3,089,734. 

It is rumored that a new hotel will be 
built in Montreal the coming summer. It 
will be called the Grand Central and will 
be built on Victoria Square. The build- 
ing will be six storeys high, and will be 
built of white cut stone from Quebec Pro- 
vince, with polished red granite pillars, 
the entire design 'being French renais- 
sance, and presenting a beautiful, impos- 
ing and artistic appearance. The building 
will be surmounted by a handsome tower. 
containing three clocks, and the distance 
from the sidewalk to the top will be 200 
feel The plans will be for 480 rooms, 
and the house, when completed and fur- 
nished, will represent a capital of $2,000,- 
000. 



V 




/ 



vy 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






E 



ft 



IT 



^ 




>2_ 



j& 



51 



S 



YOUR 
PAINT 
TRADE 



is worth looking after. It's getting to be one of tin- big money 
finders ; helps other things at the same time. 

The right paint at the right price, with tasty "ads" and 
show cards, brings people to your doors. 

Try "Ramsays Paints" for 1903, the oldest and best in 
Canada — best for price, best for quality, best for your customers 
and satisfaction to yourself. 

We're not bragging about our big gains for 1902 ; that end 
can talk loud for itself, we're after you for 1903. 

Don't you want to see one of our travellers about this ? 
Write us. 



A RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 

1842 



PAINT 
MAKERS 



MURALO 



The Perfect Wall Finish. 

Now ben is a wall finish that m y in cold 

watn and on it goes. 

The Colors are no old washed out faded tints, but rich 
and bright, and everything old fashioned is not in it with 

Muralo. 

The Muralo Co, and the Muralo Co. only, makes cold 
water wall tints as they should be made, and backs them up 
with a little more money than people are thinking about. 

Muralo sells in Canada, United States, Greet Britain, 

South Africa, Australia, and a good many more places. 

It's the best wall tint, and one trial proves it. 

Beautiful little guide books, with your own name, are all 
ready for old customers, and new customers can get them too. 
Mention this when you order. 

Muralo is in it for money, for " good goods," for " honest 
truth '' and push. 

Here Are Our Canadian Agents: 

A. RAMSAY & SON, .... MONTREAL 
THE J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO., Limited, ■ WINNIPEG 
McLENNAN, McFEELY & CO.. • - - VANCOUVER 

Makers 
THE MURALO COMPANY, New 'Brighton, Borough of Richmond, New Yor*. 



FREE INSURANCE AGAINST FIRE 




AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY TOWN. 



th 'BE5T 



Plaster 



Fire Proof 
Frost - 
Sound " 

Will not crdck. 



t/^mdlfmJ)to * ^*$^*0lj *0il l/mffym/^m4^B^fim\fmt/^m/^m/^m4\pd 




Successful Heating 

Our efforts to warm Canadian buildings economically have been crowned 
with success. The introduction of our 



U 



CONOMY" 



Hot Water Boiler and its ultimate perfecting have contributed largely to our 
fame as Beating Experts. 

The "ECONOMY" Hot Water Boiler is made along sensible lines 

strncted absolutely without holts or packing — easy to put together— means 

satisfaction to the tenant, because it works steadily and hums little fuel. 
Write for a new and attractive booklet on this system. 

J. F. Pease Furnace Co., Limited, 



Head Office, 180- iq,* Queen 5t. liast, 



T0RCNT0. 



s ^. 



f i»iys^i^^»» i 



40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SUPERIORITY OF THE SHOWER 
BATH. 

r |"MlK following ( tmparison oi the value 
of the show . t bath as > somq 
with the tub-bath i- taken from a 
paper bj Walter w rhomas, of the Liver 
pool Corporation Baths' Committee 
•• The utility of a bath for the people 
may be considered from three points of 
vi.-u : I. The best medium for cleansing 
the bodj -. as providing for the com 
fort of tbe bather, and 3, as the econom 
I ill. system. What we have to do, 
firstly, is to thoroughly cleanse llu> 
surface of the skin. That being so, the 
shower bath is uhe best medium. Hie 
water from the ring shower of a shown 
bath falls in a gentle circular shower on 
the shoulders of the bather, the -bath. 
commences to wash at his head ami 
washes down his body, finishing the wash- 
ing at his feet : while this is proceeding 
the soiled water i< carried away in the 
drain. 

far so good, but now comes the spe 
rial advantage of l li •» shower. Dp to the 
finish of the cleansing operation only 
warm water has been used. The bather 
now takes hold of the two handles con 
trolling the warm and cold water ; he 
gradually open the cold and closes the 
warm supplies until the cold is full open 
and the warm closed, thus securing for 
himself the most invigorating tonic that 
it is possible to obtain, and after the 
of the skin, which have been opened 
by the warm water and the washing are 
closed, he is in a lit and proper condi- 
tion to have his rub down and put on his 
clothing. 

" Now, it will be perhaps well to fhow 
why the ordinary tub bath is not equal 
to the shower. Imagine a man who has 
been employed in some dirty occupation 
and whose body ki< to some extent, jw- 
bag to perspiration been rendered filthv 
by contact with his work. This man 
takes a hot tub I ath, and what is the 
result ? He gets into the bath, soaks 
If, and washes the dirt off his body, 
which, in consequence thereof becomes 



part of the liquid li. is bathing in. It is 
an impossibility for that man to leave 
the bath clean. Jl«' has simply fouled the 
water and bathed in it. 

The comfort of the bather is obtained 
by the following means— viz. : Cleanliness 
and cheerfulness of the bathing establish- 
ment, plenty of light and air, pure atiuos- 
phere kepi at a proper temperature or 
temperatures, privacy, proper waiting- 
rooms, dressing-rooms, and bathrooms. 

" In comparison with the tub bath the 
shower bath is by far the most econom- 
ica, giving both a dressing-room and 
a bathroom. It occupies only half the 
floor space of an ordinary slipper bath- 
room, and therefore the building cost per 
spray and shower bath is considerably 
less than per ordinary slipper bath. The 
cost of maintenance is also very much re- 
duoed. The ordinary slipper bath con- 
sumes on an average 50 to 60 gallons of 
water, not including the shower, where 
one is attached ; the shower and spray- 
bath, even when most lavishly used, does 
not consume more than 10 gallons of 
water. In some situations the quantity 
of water consumed is of vital importance, 
particularly when a dry season like last 
year is experienced ; but even to those 
places that are blessed with an abundant 
supply of water the quantity of water 
used is of great importance, inasmuch as 
the cost of fuel for heating must be five 
times greater for the tub bath than it is 
for the shower-bath." 



TO REMOVE TARNISH FROM BRASS 

We have been asked several times for 
a receipe for removing tarnish from line 
brass articles, when it would not give 
way to an ordinary polish. 

We olier the following: Take a strong 
oxalic acid, and tub on freely, let stand 
for one minute and wash off with water. 
Polish with an ordinary brass polish. 

To turn brass a golden color, take a 
solution of hydrochloric acid, and alum. 
Dissolve in water ; steep articles for 15 
or 20 seconds. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Guelph, Out . has voted in favor of the 
installation of a civic lighting plant. 

Vincent King, who conducted a plumb- 
ing business on Beaudry street, Mont- 
real, died at his home after a brief ill- 
ness on Friday last. 

A young man of exceptionally keen 
sense of smell is employed by the gas 
companies of Buffalo to locate leaks in 
their pipes, Recently he found a leak for 
which other men had been looking for 
eight years. 

The Stratford, Out., Water Supply Com- 
pany have offered their plant to Strat- 
ford for $98,000. An expert employed by 
the city has valued the works at $110,- 
057, so a by-law to endorse the purchase 
of the works will be submitted. 

A correspondent ' in Amherst, N.S., 
writes that as an excellent sewerage sys- 
tem has been installed in that town, all 
houses now being built there are having 
bathrooms, etc.. installed. The past year 
has been an unusually busy one for the 
plumbers of the place. 

TO CLEAN ENAMELLED WARE. 

It often happens I hat the droppings 
from a nickel-plated pipe, or indeed from 
a brass pipe, stain an enamelled bath, says 
an exchange. It is not easy o clean stains 
off enamelled ware, but in this instance it 
will be found that a complete polish can be 
obtained with oxide of tin. There are 
other means of doing this, but the glaze of 
I he enamel would be destroyed in almost 
every other instance. 



WILL STAND BY AGREEMENT. 

At the last meeting of the Plumbers' 
Supply Association, held last week, the 
following resolution was passed : " Ke- 
solved, that each member notify all his 
travellers, agents, etc., that association- 
al prices are now firmly enforced and 
must be rigidly adhered to." 



Our Line of Hardware Specialties. 

is Worthy of Your Consideration. 

It is replete with trade producers that will increase your business and your profits. 

One of its many features is the most varied line of GAS and ELECTRIC FIXTURES ever offered — superior 
goods and remarkably low prices. 
In addition to a complete display of stock patterns we can design any special pattern for which there may be a demand. 
Line and prices are both worth your consideration — both worth carrying. Let us submit prices. 

The James x'Viorrison Brass Manufacturing Co., Limitc , hardware specialties. TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



41 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 



Wholesale Hard- 
Limited, ware Merchants. 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Tarred and 

Dry Sheathing, 
Tarred Felt, 
Rosin, Pitch, 
Chopping Axes, 
Broad Axes, 
Cross Cut Saws, 
Etc. 

A complete stock of Lumbermen's and Builders' Hardware always on hand. A Trial Solicited. 

PEICES EIGHT. ASK FOE PEICES. 



Barb Wire, 
Hay Wire, 
Cut Nails, 
Wire Nails, 
Cordage, 
Glass, 
Etc. 



The Only 
Exclusive 
Wholesale 
Hardware Finn 
Between 
Montreal 

and 
Toronto. 



Use Syracuse Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




RACUSt SMELTIUG" WORKS 

BABBITT METAL 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc., always In stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Cold Street, New York. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



ATKINS 

HICH-CRADE, SILVER STEEL SAWS 

Are the FINEST that Money, 
Experie nce and Skill can Produce. 

No <t. aler 'I 9l0Ck is complete without them. S*^ 

They are easy to sell. Kvery saw warranto' I. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices. 







E. C. ATKINS & CO. 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York: 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. Galvanized Plain Wire 

Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 



IL» 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



GOOD ADVERTISING 

Notes by Miss Nora Laugher, Toronto. 



M\ K I', up your mind to turn a new 
leaf and to put a bright ad. on 
thai new leaf. Start the new 
year with the idea thai you ing to 

handle i h<' advertising proposition in an 
intelligent) and businesslike way. See 
wherein business can be pushed most 
profitably, and put all the vigor and vim 
you ran into advertising to bring that 
business. 5fou have doubtless gained 
much experience in the past year, so that 
the foundation is well laid. Take stock 
mentally, as it were, look back to the 
many old mistakes and rectify them. Off 
with the old stereotyped formulae. Don't 
be conventional, stiff, unnatural in your 
wording of ads. any more than you 
would be in your talk. Talk to your 
neighbor. That's the finest and best way 

to con\ ince him. 

* » * 

Off with the old. on with the new-— new 
new announcements, progressive 



pie in the coal trade would have retained 
their wealth instead of losing it in their 
efforts to introduce anthracite coal. At 
that time a few blacksmiths in the Alle- 
ghany Mountains knew that the hard 
"stone coal," as it was called, could be 
burned, but [>eople in Philadelphia, the 
likeliest market for the new product, 
could never succeed in getting the coals 
lit. Many barge loads of the stubborn 
stuff were sold, but as no one could make 
use of his purchase, the seller was ar- 
rested for fraud and the coal dumped in- 
to the street and used for macadam. So 
soft coal remained in favor. After much 
money and time had been wasted thus, 
a man who believed in advertising went 
to Philadelphia with a barge full of an- 
thracite from his own mine, built fires in 
the common grates and stoves in public 
buildings, and invited everybody to come 
round and learn how the trick was done. 
Furthermore, he distributed circulars ex- 



were as widely apart as though they be- 
longed to different hemispheres. The 
manufacturer was crippled in a helpless, 
hopeless position, while the producer was 
at the mercy of the jobber. While the 
middleman is to-day hardly as extinct as 
the buffalo, yet producer and consumer 
have gravitated towards each other, and 
this change has been brought about solely 
by the advertisement. It is the little 
ad. that has exploded the old idea of big 
profits and small volume. Small profits 
and large volume are the chickens hatched 
by the good old advertising hen. 

"Ring out the old — ring in the new," 
especially in the case of old-style or shop- 
worn goods. Wise merchants prefer to 
see their store full of bargain-hunters 
carrying off goods at cost rather than to 
give shelf-room year after year to old 
relics of bygone fashions. Move the 
goods on. Get into stock the goods 
there is demand for, but above all pre- 



t 



* wuMffiiFCT RA I A II 



klfIHi~ ,,M iwiTwi unirw* 



Here you put your money on one side of the balance, and you are sure 
I to find Its equivalent on the other. Honest goods, honest values, and 
honest methods propel the wheels of p ogress here. Innumerable 
money-saving opportunities are always In evldenoe. Whether It's i 
FURNITURE, whether It's CARPBT8, or whether It's 8TOVE8, bear] 
In mind this Is "THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY." 



methods, more modern business plans. 
This is pre eminently the age of progress, 
and tin' firm that lags and loiters in the 
race for business will soon be forced to 
drop out and the place will be filled by 
those with 20th century methods. You 
Bhould -tart the new year with the in- 
tention of making a success with your 
advertising. Start early and stay persi I 

entry with it until the end. 
» » « 

Your advertising must lie better this 
year than it was last year to be as good 
as it was last year, because everything 
in all lii" letter and better. 

Every year must show an improvement. 
This i- evolution. Remember nothing can 
ill. |f your advertising is not 

going forward it is going backward. 

» » • 

If 90 years ago advertising had been 
the science it is to-day, hundreds of peo- 



From Providence, R.I. 

plaining the process. " Put wood under 
the coals, light it, then leave the fire 
alone," was his motto, for folks had 
sought to make hard coal blaze like pine 
kindlings. As a result, a few people be- 
gan using the commodity and real merit 
got its reward — by advertising for it. Not 
how to burn coal, but how not to burn 
it is the burning question of to-day when 
coal and coal advertisements are at a 
premium. 

• * » 

Marvellous changes have been wrought 
in the business world during the last de- 
cade, and these changes well illustrate the 
passing of the middleman. Half a century 
ago the manufacturer marketed his pro- 
duct through the jobber; the jobber then 
sold to the wholesaler, the wholesaler to 
the retailer, and the retailer to the con- 
sumer. The producer and the consumer 



sent them to the public by means of crisp, 
natural talk-to-people kind of advertising. 



RECORD SHOOTING. 

On January 1, Mr. Harry M. Pope, with 
one of Stevens, with a " Stevens-Pope " 
barrel, succeeded in breaking both the 50 
and 100-shot world's records on the 
standard American target at 200 yards 
off-hand, with a full score of 100 bullseyes. 
The former 50-shot record of Dr. W. G. ( 
Hudson was 462 points, and this was 
raised to 4b"5. The 100-shot record of 
900, also Dr. \V. (i. Hudson's, was raised 
to 908. 

The shooting was done at the first shoot 
of the year, under the auspices of the Rod 
and Gun Club of Springfield, Mass., and 
the weather conditions were perfect. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 







HARNESS PREPARATIONS. 






FRANK 
MILLER'S 

HARNESS DRESSING 



Recognised us 

" THE STANDARD." 

Produces n hrilliant Jet 
black gloss « hlcb will not 

peel or smut mid In which 

dirt will not 



f ^tJK ^tte^ 



^/?NESS SOK ? 




Harness Soap 

Unrtvaled Ibi 

rUutiiinii and BOlt- 
BnlDg Harness, 

Pol Dp in cakea. 
pans, boxes and 

tubs. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil. 



Preserves and softens the leather, 
hus adding life. 

The highest quality of oil on the 
market. 



BARNESSI 
OIL 

; DLA.CKIN' 

VE»' YOW- 



Jutes and Dutch 
Kerseys 



HORSE BLANKETS 

HORSE COVERS -l^X** ™ 

SWEAT PADS -— W1 ''' ■ ' 

Enquiries Solicited. 
HENRY F. FALKINER 

60 George Street - T0K0NT0 




GET THE ORICINAL. 

We lead, others imitate. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., 



Manufacturers. 



HAMILTON, OUT. 



LAMB FENCE 

I lie II. R. LAMB FENCE CO., Limited, London, Ont 







Steward & Romaine Mfg. Co 

EXPANSION and 
TOGGLE BOLTS 

og all kind 

124 North SlxihSt.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

GALVANIZING 

< Uir | 

Prices O.K. 01 
WINDMILLS, PUMPS, TANKS, 
FOUNDRY WORK ETC , ETC. 

Ontario Wind En p. ins ft Pump Co . L i m 1 1 a d . 

BOS Atlantic *.»•.. Toronto. 



Fire Clay 
and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement. 



STOVE BRICK 



All V. 

offdat from patttn i Prt •■ Uat, 

JONES BROS., ""Bffir&ift ° NT 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20 Guagre. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 
Superior in Design, Workmanship 

and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



8lmplest 
" Take Down 
Cun Made. 




HARRINGTON 4 RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers. 
Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO. 



NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



MPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS- 



SOLD BY A LL HARDWARE 
DEALERS. 




Canadian Heprosen ta tive : ALEXANDER OIBB. 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS. ESTABLISHED IH25. 7 •. YEARS. 



AA 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

IKS1.IK A. WALKER, general merch- 
_j ant, Moorefield, Ont., has assigned 
u> Alexander Malcolm. 

\ Laliberte, general merchant, Si. 
Nicholas, Que., has effected a compromise. 

C. Audet, general merchant, Roberval, 
Que., lias effected a compromise with his 
creditors. 

The creditors of Sheridan & Co., general 
merchants, Beeton, Ont., have held a 
meeting. 

A meeting o\ the creditors of Raoul 
Lapierre, contractor, Montreal, was held 
on January 7. 

W'm. J. &. Fred. J. Doughty, agricul- 
tural implement agents, Peterboro', have 
assigned to Harry Rush. 

There has been a judicial assignment of 
Beaudoin <!v. Turcotte, general merchants, 
Black Lake, Que. A eurator will be 
appointed on January !). 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Burke iV Shearer, agricultural imple- 
ment agents, Gainsboro', N.W.T., have 
dissolved partnership. 

McKellar & Jackson, agricultural im- 
plement agents, Rapid City, Man., have 
dissolved partnership. 

sALKs MADE AND PENDING. 

The DesBrisay Jobbing Co., general 
merchants, Salmo, B.C., have sold out to 
Ros> & Benson. 

The business of E. Sager, blacksmith, 
Norwood, Ont., is advertised for sale. 

The as>,ts o\ I). J. McDougall, saw- 
miller, Pranktown, Ont., are to be sold by 
tender. 

Thomas Puliation, hardware merchant, 
Monkton, Ont., has sold out to Robert 
Smith. 

The assets of Celestin Beaulieu, general 
merchant, St. Agathe Des Monts, Que., 
have been sold. 

Alex. Menzies, agricultural implement 
agentT Shoal Lake, N.W.T., has sold out 
to J. I). McLean. 

The siock of W. O. Langevin, general 
merchant of Grand Mere, Que., has been 
sold at 00 )z cents on the dollar. 

The stock of J.J. Gawley (estate of), 
general merchant, Belmont, Ont., has 
been sold to \V. J. Broderick at CHtf cents 
on the dollar. 

NEW FIRMS AND CHANGES. 

The Mount forest Carriage Co., Limited, 
has obtained a charter. 

M. Yineburg & Co., general merchants, 
Montreal, have registered. 

The firm of Mitchell & Larocquc, black- 
smiths, Cowansville, Que., has registered. 

The Manitoba Iron Works, Limited, 
Winnipeg, are applying for incorporation. 



The firm o( Reid & Co., Limited, deal- 
ers in paper stock and metals, has regis- 
tered the renewal o( partnership for two 
years. 

FIRES. 

The stock of Thompson & Livock, hard- 
ware merchants, Ottawa, was damaged 
b\ tire. 

15. II. Kerr, grocer and hardware mer- 
chant, Milltown, N.B., has been burned 
out ; insured. 

DEATHS. 
W. M. Beattie, contractor, Winnipeg is 
dead. 



HOWLAND'S TEAM THE VICTORS. 

The opening game of the Toronto Com- 
mercial Hockey League was played on 
Wednesday night at Varsity Rink before 
a large crowd of spectators, when H. S. 
Howland, Sons & Co. 's team defeated 
their old-time rivals,. Rice Lewis & Son, 
Limited, by 6 to 4. The ice was in good 
condition, and a fairly fast game was 
played, considering the small amount of 
practice each team had, owing to the 
continued mild weather. H. S. Howland's 
team won the toss, and defended the west 
goal. The play was fast at the start, and 
Cotton notched up the first goal for H.S. H. 
The score at half-time was 3 to 2 in favor 
of Rice Lewis & Son, but the second half 
found the Howlands in the better con- 
dition. They added 4 goals to Rice 
Lewis' 1, leaving the score at finish 
I! to 4. The stars for Howlands 
were : Gillespie, Cotton and E. B. Ryan, 



in goal, while Stains and McC'aughey 
did splendid work on the forward line for 
Rice Lewis, with Mr. Hooding a star on 
the defence. W. A. Hewitt refereed to the 
satisfaction of all concerned. The teams : 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Limited — 
Goal, E. B. Ryan; point, E. Butler; cover, 
Geo. Mitchell; forwards, Cotton (captain), 
Gillespie, H. Aikens, ci. Begam. 

Rice Lewis & Son, Limited -- Goal, js 
Bremner ; point, Webber; cover, A. Elford; 
forwards, H. Stains, McCaughey, Braizer, 
Chappelle. 

Referee — W. A. Hewitt. Timers — Roy 
and Durnan. Goal judges — Ward and 
Yokes. 



STOCKING UP. 



Most dealers begin after the first of the 
year to look about to see what are the 
makes in the various lines of goods carried 
wherein are the best profits. It occasion- 
ally transpires that a dealer will select an 
inferior line for the sake of a small extra 
margin of profit. But once show a dealer 
that he can carry the very best goods on 
the market and at the same lime realize 
from them as large or larger profits than 
from inferior lines, and he will at once see 
that this is by all means the best policy to 
pursue in the building up of a permanent 
trade. The products of The United Fac- 
tories exactly meet these conditions. 
Boeckh's, Bryan's and Cane's goods are 
always thoroughly dependable and will 
hold trade and at the same time yield a 
larger margin of profit than any other. 



To good management 
men and tools, add Apollo 
galvanized iron. 

There is no way to do so 
.good work or to make so 
much profit on it. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

58 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARR AND MKTAL 



45 




H. Boker & Co.'s registered brand of " King Cutter " Razors is their finest 
production in quality. Equal to same are : 



"KOH l-NOOR," 
"TRUE BLUE," 
"HINDOO," 



SOLD BY CAVERHILL, LEARMONT * CO., MONTREAL. 
SOLD BY RICE LEWIS & SON, TORONTO. 
SOLD BY GEO D. WOOD & CO , WINNIPEG 



"KING CUTTERS" Sold by all leading wholesale houses. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



jHmq 8, 1903. 

I. .. price! mi' fur such t|llillitics iin.l 

Suantltlea ns are usually ordered by retail 
ealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
in iMnpi pay Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prioes. The 
Editor 1b anxious to be Informed al onoeoi 
any apparent errora d this list, as thedeaire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN 
I .ami, ami Flag and Straita 

56 ami 28- lh ingots. 100 lb 839 00 ISO 00 

TIN PI. 4.TES 
Oharooal Platea Bright 

M I, s . equal to Bradley Par box. 

1 I '. usual sizes |6 75 

IX 8 25 

I X X " 9 75 

(•'unions, equal to Bradley. 

I C 8 75 

IX 8 25 

I \ \ 9 75 

Haven and Vulture Grades 

I ('. usual sizes "i ini 

IX 6 00 

I X X " 7 mi 

I X X X " 

DO. 121x17 4 50 

n \ 6 35 

I I \ \ 6 00 

Coke Plates Bright 
Bessemer steel 

i i . usual if 14x20 i 00 

i i s iul si/is. base .... 4 50 

20x38 9 00 

Charcoal Plates Terne. 
Dean or .1 *e Grade 

1 r . 20x38, 113 sheets 

IX., Terne Tin 10.60 

Charooal Tin Boiler Platea 
Oookley Grade 

X X, 14x56.50 sheet bxs i 

•• 14x60, " .... 7 uo 

" 14\6">. " ) 

Tinned Bhe< 
72x30 up to 24 gauge 8 00 

" '' 26 - 8 50 

IKON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 

Refined " 2 46 

Horseshoe i 

Hoop steel, I) to 3 in. base 

Sleigh shoe Bteel, " 2 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 mi 

Keeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk Bteel 2 85 

T.Ftrth&Co. 'stool steel, per lb 121 13 

Jessop's tool steel 14 

Morton's tool steel 124 13 

Block Diamond and " B I 

•■■ ! II 1U n II 

Leonard's tool at iel.. . . o 08 09 

Park's "Silver' tool ateel 12 14 

" " SiH-iial " . .11 IS 20 

. r s tool steel. ... 10 n 10 

" " An- Hardening' " 70 

Drill steel, per lb 10 

ItOII.KH TUBES. I 

It, 1 J anil 4 inch 

24 in il In 

3 in .... • 13 

31 in 16 

4 in 31 



BTEEL BOILED PLATE 

J in 3 60 

3-16 in 2 60 '-' 7" 

| III a, i.l < In. k. i •_' 50 2 60 

I'.i. UK SHEETS. ('.mi n m 

10 and 12 gauge '. 2 66 I 75 

2 85 3 00 

'Jll ..... 2 H', il IK) 

23 in 21 gauge 1 

3 03 

28 ' 3 1.', 

i OPPEB W n:r. 
Discount, 50 par cent 

CAM UDA PLATES 

All .lull, 52 sheets 2 90 3 00 

Halt polished 3 00 3 lo 

Mi bright 3 75 3 85 

icon nil 
Black pipe Pei 100 feet 

; inch 3 00 3 35 

1 " 2 30 2 40 

I " 

J " 2 85 

; " :i 65 

1 " 5 30 

1! " 7 35 

1J " 8 95 

2 •• 12 55 

2! " 2100 

3 " 25 00 

3J " 32 00 

4" " 38 50 

I 15 INI 

5 " 48 00 

6 " ti3 iXJ 

Galranized pipe 

! inch 3 20 

l " 3 45 

" 3 85 

5 " :. ini 

I " 7 20 

l! " 10 05 

I I " 13 30 

16 85 

Malleable Fittings Discount 30 p c 

Cast Iron Kill ink's 

On all cast iron fittings, Including plugs, 
bustlings, unions ami nipples. 50 ,t 10 p. c. 'lis. 
All others discount 60 p c 

i. \i.\ \M/KI) SHEETS Queen's 

i. i Gomel Bell Head 

16 gaunt 

26 i 23 I 00 3 20 

I SO 4 25 I 06 4 .mi 

American brands, - I 

I. an Base lots in i" 15c • \tra. 

• il \i\ 

Proof mil. 3-16 in., par 100 lb 

8 10 

'. 16 

i i SO 

7-16 " I 25 t 50 

••j I 2fl t 50 

t OB 
i i ini t so 

; •■ i so 

Halter, kennel and post chains, to i" 4n and 
6 pist 

10 ii c 

T nt chains 

stall fixtures •■ p 

Trace chain 

hain. iron, single anil double, ili.vouiit 

36 p i 
Jack chain, brass, single ami dggbk 

OOOnt 40 p c. 



i OPPEB 

Pi 100 lb 
English B 8 . ton lot! 13 ini 

Lake Superior 

Cut lengths, round, 

round and square, 

1 to 3 has 23 00 

Plain, 14 OX., anil lighl. Ill 11/ . 

14x48 and 14x60 23 mi 23 50 

Plain. It i>/ . and Light, 16 ox, 

irregular sizes 
Tinned oopper sheet 24 ini 

Planished 33 00 

Braziers 1 (in she* 
1x6 n . 25 to 30 lb. each, per lit 

35 to 46 " 33 

" 501k ami above " 'I 21 

1:011.1:1: \NU T K PITTS 
Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BB \ss 

Rod and Sheet, It to 30 gauge, 15 pei cent 
Sheets, hard-rolled. 2x4 
Tnl, inn. base, per II, 

Z1N( SPELTER. 

11, per 100 lb 5 "lO 6 l»l 

Domestic 

ZINC SHEET 

5 OWt casks 6 INI 

Pari casks I i . 8 50 

LEAD 
Imported Pig, pi r uni ii. 

lb n 05 

Sheets, 2 1 . lb. sq. ft., by roll . 
Sheets, 3 to 6 lb 

Notk Cut sheets v pet Mi , extra Pipe. 
l,y the mil. usual weights p,r yard, lisU 
]K-r II, and 37| p c 'lis f b Tot 

i mi lengths. 11, 1 pj toe, Mi, si, pipe 
8-ft. length! 

shut 

Con n. 96 50 pei 100 lb . chilled, 07 00 

|«T UNI lli ; buck, seal ami hall. W.50 Di~ 
cunt. 22j D.C P I 

Hamilton. Montreal, SI John and II 
Terms. 3 p 0, cash, freights equalized 

BOIL I'll'l \NH ill 1 1 ni .-, 
Light s,,il pipe, discount 46 pei 

fittings, di cell! 

n.l Extra leavy pipe fillings. dia 
111 per cent 

I 

SOI DEB 
df-and-half, guaranteed 20 

Bar, half-and-half, commercial 13 

: 

Wiping 11 17 

\\ I l\MN\ 

Co pet lb 

win n 11 \u Per 100 lb 

v.. 1 1 • . 4 874 

N 

No. J 1871 

N ' 

Munros Select Flake White 

Kh phanl ai 

Brandram ■ I! 11 Genuine 

\.i 1 
M Darofa " hraml 
I • Pure 

Kssex Genuine 5 50 



III li II Mi 



1 . 1 1 »l 

. 

No 1. 560 • »i 
No 1. 100 li. ' ■ 


1 -1 


W III 1 1 /IM 




i> 1. 
No 1 
N.i 2 11 OS 


08 


ni:\ u 1111 1 LEAD 






. 







PREPARED PAINTS 

Pure, |ier gallun 

- ill, .11 

1 11 ,1 

Thi Bhei arin-Williait 
t anada Paint Co 1 pu 

■ I., a-l \ ( ■ Ini ( .. - i 

Stewart ■ W I - 1 ban | 

pure 

I 

The I I 

.1 
The 



1 DLORS IN OIL 

- 
... t 11, 1 

rellos u 12 

Golden ochre 

1 
' 

1 
Signwi iters blai l, 
Iturnt umber 

sienna 
1, 1, el 



( ULORB, I >l: N 

t ',,iiiiii,tn ochre, bbls 

Veil.,. ,, 1, ., til- 

1 15 
1 

1 75 

. 

• 

Super 11, 1 

Burnt 

111, 
paw umber 

Itpip I'he 

Golden 

I'll I , Cl 

M 

■ 
« 






|,,\l 



1 



I 'Nl 
I iU 

I 20 
I 00 



11 It 
n in 

11 Pi 

ii 11 

11 II 

i> II 

11 11 






36 






40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE ANlJ METAL 



WADE & BUTCHER'S 

"SPECIAL" Razors 



Are unequalled for quality and finish. 



JAMES HUTTON <£ CO., 



MONTREAL 



Sole Agents for Canada 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in hhls 1 90 

Bulk in leas quantity '-' 06 

Bladders in 1.1.1s 

Bladders in keea, boxes or loose 9 m 

Bladders in 25-lb. (ins 2 :i."> 

Bladders in 121 lb. tins 2 66 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 2 90 

V A K M M 1 I - 

In S-eaJ. lots. Pergal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable hn.lv 4 10 l 25 

rubbing 2 85 :i 2o 

Gold size, japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 brown Japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 125 

N.>. 1 1 10 

Hard oil finish 165 175 

Light oil finish 1 40 1 60 

Damar 1 70 1 85 

Shellac, » hite 2 35 2 45 

orange 225 235 

Turpentine, brown japan 125 130 

black japan 85 I 20 

No. 1.0 50 75 

Elastilite varnish. 1 gal. can. each. 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels : size 1. $1.20 : 

■ . size .'(. Wc. each. 

Sherwin-Williams 1 kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from : pts. bo 1 gal., $2.50. 

. AST. .11 ..II.. 

Easi India, in cases, per lb... 09$ 10 

small lota 10 10J 

I.. I CI 

( ixl oil. pel gal 50 55 

Pure olive 1 20 

" . 90 

BLUE. 

Common 08 09 

French medal o lo o 14 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

I Malm.- 25 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

15 16 



HARDWARE. 
All Ml v [TION. 

dgee. 

I; B Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 per cent 
Rim Fire PistoL discount 40p.c, American. 

Rim l l l ' nton, ' !| and 5 p c 

and Rifle, lo p.c, Amer. 
< Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domiri 
Ion, 30 per cent. 

i I dgee, Sporting and Mili- 

tary. Dominion, 1"> pel i ent 

i Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer 
ican, add 5 per cent t<> list B B I 
discounl 4'f pel i enl . American. 
Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap and 
■■ DomJ Rival 

and Nitro, 10 per cent advance on List. 
- I ells, .'.'. per cenl 
I . cent.; American 

Wads per lb. 

ick "hit. fell wadding, in I lb 

-1 00 
jrej felt wads, in 

70 
i ilck white card wads, in I 

.,f 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges o 99 
ick white card wads, In b 

o 35 
ik white card wads, In t> 
,,f 500 each, B ga 8 55 

Thin card w;i t LOOOeach, 

12 and smallei gauges 20 

ard wad-, in qoxea of 1,000 

?... 25 
Thin card wads, in holes of L0O0 

■/■■..'■ 



Chemically prepared black edge grey 
doth wads, in boxes ol 250 each Pi r M 

11 and Binallei gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges o 70 

7 ami 8 " '."I 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white clots wads, in 
boxes of 250 each 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 unci in gauges 1 40 

7 and s " l 65 

5 and 6 " l 90 

ADZES. 

Disc. mnl 20 per cent. 

WVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over LOi 

Hay Budden, 80-11). ami over 09} 

Brook's, 80-lb. ami over 11} 

At i;brs. 

Gil ur's, discounl 65 and 5 per cent. ..it' list 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double hit. " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes. 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes. 25 per cent 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

AXLE CREASE. 

< Ir.Iinary. per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bi i quality 13 00 15 00 

BATH TlliS. 

Zinc 6 '"I 

Copper, discount 15 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

Standard Enameled. 

.V, inch rolled rim. 1st quality 24 00 

5} 2nd " 20 00 

BABBIT METAL. 

"Tandem," A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " o m 

Krict ionless Metal " 23 

Hercules " 15 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

20 

Extra "15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine I 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No 3 06 

No 1 05 

BELLS. 

Hand. 
Brass, 80 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow 

American make, discount 63ij per cent 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 pt I CI Ql 

1 1 

Gongs, Sargant'e 5 50 8 00 

Peterboro . discounl 16 per cenl 

Farm 
American, each l 25 

ll 

Ami n. an. per lb 35 in 

BELLOWS 

n id. ■ 3 35 I 76 

Moulders, per doz 7 50 in Oil 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 |k.t cenl 



BELTING 

Extra, tin per cent. 

Slam lard. 60 and 111 per cent 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in . 60, 10 and In Dei 

cenl 

Agricultural, mil wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent 
Koekfor.l. discounl 50 and 10 pei oenl 
Jennings Gen . net list. 
Car. 

Gilmour's, 47^ to 50 per cent. 
Expansive 
Clark's, 40 pet cenl 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond. Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail inn) Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AM. BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 072 12 

BOLTS \NI. M -IS. PM cenl. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 55 and 10 
" full sq. ($2.40 list) 55 and in 

" Norway Iron 1*3 

list) 50 and 10 

Machine Bolls, all sizes 50 and HI 

Plough Bolts 50 and 10 

Blank Bolts 50 and Hi 

Bolt Ends 50 and 10 

Shigh Shoe Bolts 65 and 10 

Coach Screws, cone point 663 and 10 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3;c. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes. 4ft per 11. off. 

Stove Hods, per lb., 51 | . 6c 

Nuts, in 50-lb. lots. [c. per Hi. extra: in less 
than 50-lb lots, '.'■ extra. 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 5C 

BRIGHT WIRE noons. 

Diai ounl ''>'-" per cenl 

BKIHI.EItS. 

Light, discount 155 to 117' per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 67} per cent 
Vegetable, per doz.. discount 37' percent. 

Henis, No. 8 per doz 6 00 

Henis, No .0 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " J 50 

BUTCHERS CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 oo 11 00 

American " 12 oo 20 oo 

BUTOHEB KM\ is 

Bailey's per doz. 80 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, l n 

Tarred Kelt, per 100 Hi 1 75 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, mil under 45 11... 

per roll 90 

Heady roofing. 3-ply, Dot under 05 lb., 

■par mil l 15 

i :n pit I'. H per ton 45 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq, ft 35 

Tai " " 400 " 45 

I m Fibre " 400 " 50 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 60 

O. K. fcl. X.L.... " 400 " 65 

Resin-sized " 400 " 40 

i IN. d Sheathing. . " 600 " 1 10 

Oiled " ... " 400 " II 70 

Roof Coaling, in harrels pergal. 17 

Hunt small packages ' 25 

I.'' Bned Tai per barrel 4 50 

Coal Tai " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than hands. . . .pergal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 85 

BI It. RINGS. 

' oppi I ' ' " inch, and si 90 fm 2 inch 

ci lis. 

\\ . oughl Brass, oel revised list. 

I 

Loose PI 



Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 2.J, per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 2] per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70, 70 and 5 percent. 
Gen. Bronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz l 00 150 

Billiards " .... 6 50 

C \STUItS. 
Bed, new lisl. discount 65 to 571 per cenl. 
Plate, discount 52.1 to 571 l"'i' cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Sos 31 and 32 pergroaa s 50 9 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

While lump perewt. 60 65 

Bel 05 no 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 
Socket, Framing and Kirnier. 
Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent 
P s &W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cenl 

CHURNS. 

Revolving Churns, metal frames No. 0, $8 
No. 1. $8.50; No 2, $9.00; No. 3, $10.00: 
No. 4. $12.00; No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames, 20c. each less than the above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 53 
per cent. ; from stock ill Montreal, 51 per 
cent. Terms 4 months or 3 per cenl. cash in 
30 days. 

Churn frames, including hearings, levers, etc. 
Nos. 0, 1, 2 and 3, wood. N2.40; and 4 and 
5, $2.65. Metal fiames. 25c. extra. I>is 
count 15 per cent., net 30 days. 

CLIPS. 

Axle, discounl I).", pel cenl 

CLOSETS. Net 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon .let... $9 60 

Kmli " " 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Ten. Syphon Washout 6 00 
Emh, " " " ..6 60 

Killings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain. . 9 60 

Low " " emh. .. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 3 75 

Emh. " 4 00 

i lonneol ions 1 25 

Low Down Ontario Syphon Jet, plain 11 70 

Low " " " einhd. 12 30 

( 'Inset connection 1 25 

Basins. P <>., 14-in 70 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins. " 19 x 15-in 2 25 

COMPASSES, DIVIDERS, ETI . 

American, discount 62i to 65 per cent. 
CONDI (l..l: eiei; 
Plain 01 (''.ungated 
2-inch per 100 feel 3 00 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 , ( 

. i. \ i.l.cs, in: M\ 

Canadian, discounl 20 lo 96 I m 

CROSSCUT saw II \\ HI. is 

S .x l) , No 3 per pair o 17} 

s \ I) . " 5 " u 231 

s. & I)., " 6 " 15 

Boynion pattern " 20 

: SPRINGS 

Tone) s Rod (15 p.!. per doz ... 2 00 

Coil " 88 1 60 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAM h\n is 

Coach and Wagon, discounl 60 and 10 per 

relit 

I aii" 'I'll s , discount 60 and 10 per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



47 



1 Word of Thanks to Our Customers 

Our trade has increased considerably during the past year, and we are 
very grateful to our customers in consequence. 

We sincerely hope our pleasant business relations will continue, and we 
wish all of you the limit of success and prosperity during the ensuing year. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



Toronto and Montreal. 



DRILLS 

Hand Mid Bread 
Millar * Palls, per doz , net list 
DULL ii i - 

i oent. 
Standard, discounl percent 

rAU( i rs 

c 11, cork-lined, discount 35 per oent 

t VV I 1 l:.n QHS 

in in. h pei 100 it 3 10 

■LBom (storeptpe l 
i and 6-lnoh, oommon pei do I 90 

i 

Polished, l " per dozen extra 

■SI i I. BBONS 

His, . mm 111 pir lint 

I -i I I. IIH.S II \s 

Iron, disoounl in per oent 

t V rOW MILK i V\s 

Dim , .urn ,.ir revised list tOperoent 
i ii i - un> hasps 

u astern 70 mi. 1 I" per .■.ni 

v ide 10 

Kearni rJtPool . 7" " lo 

Disstona 70 " l" 

American 70 " in 

.1 Barton smith 70 " in 

McClellan 70 " in 

Eule .70 " 10 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60. 10 and ."> 

Royal 90 

Globe 70 i" 78 

Black Diamond, GO and lo to 60, 10 and 5 per 

oent 
Jowitt's, English list i cent. 

Nichol Simplicity " file handle, 

per gross 85c. 

..I l>s 

Window, Boa i'i i 

Star li l i 

Size United Per Per Per Pi 
Inches SO f 1 100 ft. 50 ft 100ft 

In.l. r 26. . 2 20 t 25 E 2E 

in t i.i i - . b ".". 

41 to 50 5 10 

t!0 5 35 .... 8 50 

t.l t.. 70 5 75 .... 9 75 

71 I. .80 625 .... 11 no 

7 INI ' 

7 75 

17 50 

100 

OAUI 
vi U Etc 

Stanley's, discounl 50 to 55 per oent 

\\ II, <..!'.. 

Wilms, Hoe 26 to S3 each l 65 I U 

II Vl.lt I - 

Hope, ; inch .per gross 

" 9 00 

. to !-lnch . ... " .... 14 "i 

Leather, 1 inch. per doz 3 S7; 1 00 

r. Ii " ... ■"• 1"> 

Web . " 1 87 

ii onn H 

Null 

Lillian 

discount . ni. 

I 
\i ,n, per .In/ 1 1" ' 20 

Sled 
Canadian pei lb "7: o 08} 

Ball i 
English and Canadian, per lb o 99 

II VMM H 

w. perdoz nel l Ml 

inor perdos 1 00 1 50 



No 12, 10 fool run. 

N I I. I", fool run 

Lane's O.N.T track, 



F.irk 

i I B . .iisr.nuii in pei »■. ni , i. \ iaed list 

II...-. 
. KB., disoounl 10 pei oenl . n rised list-. 

Saw, 

American. i"' T doi l 00 i 25 

Plane 

Am. 1 1. an pel grOSfl 3 16 3 78 

Malum- I an. I Hal. h. I 

( 'iiiiii.linn. disoounl In pel < ni 

I 'ill Sau.s 

Canadian pei pair o la; 

II (Mills 4.. 

Steel barn dooi .'. 65 6 <*i 

in, 4 inch 

.'■ in. Ii 6 50 

Lan,. s covered 

No. 11. 5-foot run ... g 40 

No 11 J, 10-fool run 10 80 

.... 12 nil 

.... 2! Kl 

o in: 

il vi;v KM e 

i 1 l 60 and 10 pe nl 

II V I. Hi i 

'in, discounl I" to 1-1 per oent 

il is.it IS, 

Hliml, Parker s, disoounl 16J percent 

Hi svj T iiinl si rap. 4 in . per ill 06] 

.".-in .. " 06} 

fi-in . 06 

8 in . •■ H o.v; 

10 in. 05} 

Light T ami strap, discounl 65 ami ."> per cent 
Sore*: hook ami ninge 

6 i.. in in per mi li. .... 4 50 

12in up .... 

. per gro pail h id 50 

ll.il - 

i lorden, Uortar, etc., disoounl 60 to 60 ami lo 

per cent 
Planter perdoz, 4 oo 4 50 

lliil.l.i.vv H Mil 

Disoounl I", an. I "i per cent 

BOOKS 

I nut. 

Bird cage . per .1." 50 l lo 

Clothes line 27 63 

Harness " 72 88 

Hal an. I 00*1 Dei no, 1 01 3 00 

Chandelier pet doz. o 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks ami staples, Canadian 'lis 
count i 

H 
Hat ami mat. disoounl 46 per cent 
Bell per 1,000 60 

bright discount 55percent 

IlilKst NAILS 

rand, 40, 10 and 71 percenl off list I Oral 
vi rand, fiuilO aodo per oent I hi-atl 

-a.ii, .v. |>, i oent 

M iii-h. 66 per taut 

.mil 7| per cent 'lis 

BOBamsHoi ■ 

P.O.B M. nil rial 
N \ 

liai B and biiiI 

larger small. I 
Light ni"lniiii ami ' 3 60 

3 r,i i 

Steel - 
Ughl 

Featherweight mil *izes| 
P.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London ami 
Ouelph, Mi- per keg additional. 
mhi steel shoes. 

ni'iNvni » v in 
..I. I 5 per oent "if list. .In 
n t PICKS 

Star.. perdos .'. "i 



h i 1 1 1 i - 

" 

i oppi I I 

American, 60 and lo to 65 ami 5 pi 

ni- 

Look, Canadian dl 

Cabinet trunk ami padlock, 

\ . i oss ii 60 

KS' 

1 1 lapanned ami N P , pei 

doz I " 

Bronze, Berlin pei ii"/ 

.in. i; mi 

Shutter, porcelain, I-' .'. I 

:\ p. i . i 1 30 i it i 

\\ Int. .1 km. lis pit .1../ il 26 I '«l 

If v V hMl t s 
Nel priiis 

I. V HP « Il Ks 

Discount lio per i ent. 

LANTI BUM 

Ci.lil Blasl pi rdoi 7 in 

No 3. "Wright ■ 

Osdlnary, with o burnei I '■' 

anl. cold blast " '.' oo 

Nil o 

Japanning, i>Of. perdoz, extra 

i ni„\ si.i i i /, i 

Porcelain lined..., perdoz 2 90 

Galvanized " 1 87 

» 1 " 2 75 9 90 

King, glass " 4 00 I 50 

a.n glass " 50 ii '«i 

LIMBS 

Fish per gross 1 o: 2 60 

Chalk I '.«i 7 in 

LAWS Mi." 

Woodyatt, 12 in wheel 7 50 

Slur .'• 50 

1'aiss " I -i 

Philadelphia, 10 in wheel 6 mi 

Ontario, " 12 7". 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOOKS 

Canadian, 4o in 40 ami 10 pi 

ii • Brwin perdoz 3 on 

Cal. imt 

Eagle, disoounl 30 per oent. 
Padlocks 
English and Am perdoz 50 6 00 

Sramlinanaii I'll 2 40 

Ka^'l*-. discount 2u » . 

M m HIM si BBS s 

[run ami Bl 

Flat bead, dlsoonnt 25 per enl 
K.'uu'l head, discounl 90 per cent 

MALLETS 

Tinsmiths perdoz I 

Carpenters . hli 

Lignum Vita. 

Caulking, each •'■" 2 00 

lIUlMI ks 

: an pel 0"/ 5 " t H 

HI VI • I I I I I IS 

v in. .lis '.mm 33', per .'nt 

flemisn, 1'' i- 
Gem • i- ' I U 

Mil K CAH lllOIVIS... 

I . .'.'lit 

N Ml s ( i,| H 

2.1 ami 3.1 

Sd 3 I'l 3 12 

4 ami .VI 

I ;•! 

-I 

10 mil 12.1 
I6aod90d 

I60d(basel 

Cut nails in i arli. Is - 
VV nails in carlol 
Cut nail 

VI 

Flnnr liarrvl nsil*, di- 



v Ml III., 
s. Ml 

M.I 

l-.il I. I 111 M 

2 ill \l 

! ' P.I 







OAKI M 




i a • 


fSTJ 


pat 100 lb 





"II I 

Model I lized 

ml 'an. uiii. pump 

per dozen in hi 

Zinc ami tin. discounl 50, 50 ami I" i- 
l 

I -i 
Malleable .1 

.. U.HM/n, PAl 

Plaring pan- 
Galvanized srashtul 

ill . 1 !• WAKl 

• 
10 ni flaring mil l"i 

1'.. Ill ami 1 4 i|' ll.11 1 
( 'fail" 

in h- 

Per dozen 

IP II 111 V Ml - 

Porcelain hi 1 «i 

Brass li.a.l 11 I I I ill 

l-li 1 1 1:1 s 
Tin and gilt discounl 75 percent 
pun 1 vi 
pirn in mi- peri 






II V M - 



\\ . . 

Am. 1 n an discounl 

w 

I'I V M ll'nv. 

pi I .1.', 

I - v\|. Mil ■ 

Unit. .11 - s. nuine, pi 1 •) 

■ 
Button's imitation 

1-1 1 IDS 

I M I I 
Fuller »..rk. .1 

oounl 

• nt Willi. . 
an extra discount I 
I \l I 
discount 

I \l I 
HtamUnl Radi 1 

I'nt, nt l,in. k 1 

\ •' 

V I 

S 
'■ 












18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



-TO IMPORT. 



11 'I I IB I HW 



Prompt Deliveries 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BENT GLASS °f a " kinds, our own manufacture. Closest Prices. 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



VVarerooms and Offices— 135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



PRI S3BD BPIKl B 

|ii- .urn 331 l K ' r cent 

rn.i.ii a 

Hothouse per dot 55 100 

V vl. '• 22 33 

- 27 10) 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS 

Canadian cistern 180 360 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

li NCHE8. 

Saddler's perdoz. loo 185 

Conductor's " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid per set ... 72 

hollow per inch 100 

l: vnue BOILERS. 

Dominion, 30 gallon nel 6 00 

35 " " 7 00 

40 " " 8 00 

Ronalds Galvanized, 30 gallon, " 7 40 

35 " " 8 40 

40 " " 9 60 

per, 30 gallon " 22 00 

" 3T, • " 24 00 



Discount oflf copper boilers 10 

RAKES. 

H per doz. net 

RAZORS 
BUiol s 


pet ce 

1 20 
per 

4 00 
4 00 
7 50 
12 50 

3 m 

7 00 
6 00 

111 IK) 


28 00 

it. 

up. 
doz. 

18 00 




18 00 


Boker b 

King Cutter 

Wade .v Butcher b 

Thiilc ft Quack's 


11 01) 
15 oo 
10 oo 

12 00 
12 00 


Bailey s Branltnrd 

Oarbo Magnetic 

Griffon Barber's Favorite .... 

Griffon No. 65 

Griffon Safety Razors 

Griffon Stropping M 


11 00 
15 00 
10 7.'. 
13 00 
13 50 
13 50 



REGISl ERS 

Discount 40 per < ent. 

RIVETS AMI Bt BBS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

lo per cent- 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent 
Extras on Iron linns in 1-lb. cartons, |c 

per lb. 

on Iron Rivets in |-lb cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs. 45 

per cent discount Cartons, lc per lb. 

extra, net 
Copper Hun- .ml j. discount 30 ami 10 percent 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, Ml. 

cartons, lc per lb. 

l:l\ I i 

Canadian, discount 35 to 37J per 

BOP) 

Sisal 12 

Pun- Manilla 14 

"British Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and large) 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

| inch 22 

I: . I I ; - O 1 '. 

Jut- 08 

Lath Tarn, single Oil 

double 111 
Bisal bed cord, 48 feet ...perdoz 

" 60 feel " 80 

•• 72 fee) 95 

Bt M - 

Boxwood, discount 55 and 10 per cent 
Ivory, discount 37 i to 40 pel 

BAD li:' 1MB, 
M P S polished, i" 

nickle plated, " 80 

DASH UH) BMBRV PAPER. 

innt, 4o and 5 pei cent 

10 per cent 
Garni 10 per cent. ■ 

on lint. 



so 1 sen is. 
Bronzed iron with hooks . . .)ier 1.000 9 50 

SAWS 

Hand. Disstons, discount 12 1 per cent 
S ft I) . disc. mnl 40 per cent. 

Crosscut Disston s. .pe) fool 35 55 

8. Bt 1> . .lis omit 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Back, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only 75 

S X S 1 1 \V I 1 1 . 1 1 IS 

Sectional per 1001b. 2 50 2 75 

.Solid " 1 75 2 00 

SASH i hi: n 

Per Hi 23 30 

SAW SETS. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets, No. 1 Woodyatt ( Morrill) 4 25 
X-Cul Sets, No. :i Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

SCALES. 

Burrow, Slew art & Milne 

Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cent. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 55 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
Dominion, disc, .not .Viper cent. 
Richelieu, discount 55 per eent. 
Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
Champion, discount 55 percent. 
Weighlieanis, discount 35 per cent. 

si'KK.w DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per do/. 65 100 

SCREEN ) RB 

t'oi i doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained. 3-in. style perdoz. 6 60 

Common doors.2 or 3 panel, yellow and 

green stained, 3-in. style.. . .per doz. 6 80 
I . in in en i doors. 2 or 3 panel, in natural 

colors, oil finish per doz. 8 15 

4-in. style 20c. per dozen extra. 

sen i . w a 

W 1. F. H.. bright and steel, discount 87J 

and 10 per cenl 
W 1. R. H , bright, dis. 82' and 10 per cent 

F. H., brass, dis. 80 and 10 per cent. 

1! H, ' dis. 75 and 10 per cent. 

F. H.. bronze, dis. 75 percent. 

R. H , " dis. 70 pet cent. 

Ill ive Screws, dis. 871 and 10 per cent 

Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

s. \ DIES. 

Perdoz. net 5 00 8 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

1 aiiadian, discount 411 per cent 

Slit \Ks 
Bailey Cutlery Cn , full nickeled, disc.unl 60 

and 2.', per cent 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 671 

pel cent. 

Seymours, discount 50 and 10 per cent 

SHOVELS AMI SPADES. 
Canadian, discount 40 and 5 per cent 

slVhs. 
Sleel and galvanlSSed, discount I', |.. i i .hi 
3N M'S. 

Harness. German, discount 25 p. 

Lock, Andrews 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS 

; peril. 37 

2 1b. or over " 34 

I v BBS. 

Iron, \o 493 ... . pei doz. 2 4o 

No t'.n 3 25 3 40 

Sle.l, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per cent 
Try and Bevel, discount Ml 

s| \ M )■)]> V. 

Plain, discount 75 and 12J per cent, off re- 
vised lint. 
P.ciinned, discount 75 per cent, off revised list 



ST iri.Es, 
Galvanized 3 25 3 50 

Plan, 2 HO 3 15 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 percent 

STOCKS ami l>IKs 
American discount 25 percent. 
STONE. 

Washita peril). 28 60 

Hind. .stan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador 13 

Axe " .... 15 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas .... 1 50 

Water-of-Ayr " .... lo 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 2-in.,40to 200 lb.,per ton .... 25 00 

■• under 40 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STIIV KPll'ES 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENA.MELINE STIIV): POLISH. 

No. 4, 3 doz. iii ease net cash .... 4 80 

No. 6, 3 doz. in ase.. " .... 8 40 

TACKS, BB Mis. ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 and 12i 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned. . 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 15 

tinned 80 and 20 

(in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

} weights HO 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk... 85, 121. and 12'. 
brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12J 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52J 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining lacks, in papers 10 

- in bulk 15 

" solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle-nails, in papers 10 

in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 25 

Zinc glaziers points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

bulk (0 

Shoe nails 60 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINKS. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Ohesterman's each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS 

i :.i ii. ., b, discount 25 p.. cenl 

THERMOMETERS 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 lo 75 and 10 
per e. nl 

Titus (steel ) 

Came. N. whouse, disc it 25 per cent. 

came, ll a N , P s ,\. w . 65 percent 

Came, steel, 721, 75 per cenl 
TliliW I Is 

Disstons, discount 10 per ,■■ m 

n per doz. t 75 6 00 

s, ft l) . discount 35 per cenl 

TH INI, 

i; i Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply • .... 19 

4-ply 23 

Mattress per lb. 33 o 45 

Staging " 27 35 



VISES 

" l '-'" s 0131 

Brook s 12s 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 '.'.'. 350 

, " _" " No. 2 5 50 

Saw V ise 4 50 9 00 

KNAMELLEl) WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

10 pel cent 

Granite or Tearl, Imperial, Crcsc-m, discount 
50, 10 and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 

NO 0-9 gauge £2 50 

J° 6c. extra. 

' 12c. " 

2 20c. " 

13 30c. 

14 " 40c. 

Jj 55c. 

bl " 70c. " 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. Oiled wire 10c., 
spring wire si, 25, special hay baling wireHOe , 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 15c , 
charcoal (extra qualify) si. 25, packed in casks 
Ot cases 15 ,, bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and lOOlli bundles 10c., in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, u> 5 and lll-lb. bundles 25c., in 1-lb. 
hanks. 50c, in S-lb. hanks 75c, in J-lb. 
hanks si. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No 17 
s5 No 18. s.5 50 Noli), S6 No. 20, 1*6.65 
No. 21, 87— So. 22. 1*7.30 No. 23. S7.65 No. 
24, i*8 No. 25, s9 No. 20. si) 50 No 27 
slO Nn 28. sll No 2!i, S12 No. 30, S13 
No.31, #14- No. 32, $15 No. 33, $16 No. 34, 
817. Extras net tinned wire. Nos. 17-25, 
s2 Nos. 26-31, $4- Nos. 32-34, si; Coppered, 

5c. Oiling, 106. in 25-lb. bundles, 15c in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c. - in 1-lb. hanks, 2.V 

in '-lb. hanks, 38c in 1-lb. hanks, 50c 
packed in casks or cases, 15c bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Brass wire, discount 621 per cent, off the list. 

i topper wire, discount 62J per cent, net cash 
30 days, fob factory. 

Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, 
.S3.70 to S3. 90 Nos. 6,7,8,1*3.15 to S3 .35 
No. 9. 82 .65 to •2.85 No 10, 83.20 to $3.40 
No. 11, $3.25 to $3.45 No. 12, S2.80 to 
-.'. No. 13, 83.90 to 84.10— No. 14. $3.76 to 
$3.95 No. 15, $4.30 No. 16 $4.30 Base 
sizes, Nos. I', to 9. S2.27J f.o.b. Cleveland. In 
carlots 12?.c less. 

Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4 65; No. 18. $2 V 90; No 19, $2.60. Hollow 
6 strand, No. 17, s4.30; No. 18. $2.70; No 
19, $2,35; No. 20, $2.30, fob Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal 

WIRE I IN. I NO 

Galvanized barb 2 90 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 90 

Galvanized barb, fob Cleveland, $2 671 in 

less than carlots, and s2 55 in carlots. 

WIRE (LOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq, ft., nel .. 1 40 

Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASTE COTTON. 

Colored per lb. 06 

White " 08 

WRENCHES, 

Acme, discount 35 I" 371 per cent. 

Agricultural, discount lib percent 

t oi b I outline, discount 20 lo 25 per cenl 

Towers Engineer each 2 00 7 00 

S perdoz. 5 80 6 00 

<; ,N K.'s Pipe " .... 3 40 

Bun-ell's Pipe each ... 3 00 

Pocket perdoz. 25 2 90 

WRINIIEHS 

Leader per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian " .... 24 00 

Royal American " .... 24 00 

Sampson " .... 24 00 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

WROUGHT IKON WASHERS 

Canadian make, discount 40 per cent. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturer*' Ag eot and Metal Broker, 
I] St. John Street . Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be representedin Canada. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sires. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for expoit With or without " Kmlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works, 

Machinery," Newport. Newpokt, Mon., Enc.lanu. 

ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALL8, CANADA. 

V.n.,f.rt„r.r. „f F«.*TW»RE, CUTLERY and 

Sinufictureri of ELECTR0 p L »TE. . . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



KNOX HENRY ^ 

Room 32 Canada Ufa Bidg , MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS -" O " Brand Horn - Nails 
as Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRAS8ITE" QOOD8 - Qnnn Castor Co. 

Limited, Birmingham, Kng. 



Always 
ask for 



"BAILEY" BRAND CUTLERY 



FULLY WARRANTED 



= i 

Is 

3= V 



Complete Lines In 

(Shears, Scissors, Razors, 

and Butcher Knives. 




ev * 

-+ -t 

o » 

» -s 



BAILEY GUTLERY GO. 

BRANTFORD, CANADA. 



I Imlte.l 



CHAS. P. CLARK. President. 



JkMKIi CHITTENDEN. Trsuursr. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, SI, 500, 000. Offices Throughout the Civilised World. 

Executive Offices: Rot. 346 and 848 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and lb. 
controlling I'lrcaiuatauceeof every seeker of mercantile credit. IUs business may be defined as of the merchants, 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating Information, no effort Is spared, and 
n > reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify its claim as an authority on all matters 
alTeciing commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
fur jlshes Information concerning mercantile persons tbroughont the civilized world. 

Subscriptions (.re based on the service famished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Hpeclflc 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON. ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG. MAN. 



MONTREAL, QTJK. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THUS. C. IRVING. Gen. Mtn, Western Camdi, Toronto. 



Z 




A Word to the Wise 
is Sufficient. 



Do not be led into placing an oider fcr ,cu 
requirements in the Stove and Range line for thi s season 
without first communicating with us for prices, and 
seeing a sample of our goods. 

It means dollars and heaps of satisfaction to ,..- ; 
energetic dealer who handles .... 

"Huron " Stoves and Ranges. 

— Absoiutely the finest sold. 
— The trade acknowledge it. 

We shall have a complete and exten 
sive line of all kinds ready for this 
year's trade 

THE WESTERN FOUNDRY CO., Limited, 

''Quality First and Always." »^ WINUtlAM, ONT. 





Est. 1868 



Inc. 1895. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve - c ^ »• Medals 



i! 







Awarded 
By JURORS ^ 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




PATENT INTERLOCKING 

RUBBER TILING. 

The most perfect floor covering for Hotels, 
Cafes, Business Offices, Banks, Court Rooms, 
Churches, Hospitals, Vestibules, Halls, Billiard 
and Smoking Rooms, Lavatories and Bath Rooms. 

NOISELESS NON-SLIPPERY 

WATERPROOF SANITARY 

Carefully selected range of soft, beautiful 
colors affording ample scope for combinations in 
harmony with surroundings. 

Write for Prices and Particulars 



Sola Canadian Manufacturers . 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
46-47-49 West Front St. 



TORONTO, 



Factories- 1 15-166 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



CANADA. 



Portland Cement. 

J. B. WHITE & BROS' 

Brand. 



M"^ ^ y The Associated Portland Cement Mfrs. (1900) 
Limited, of London, England, who supplied some 90,000 tons 
of the cement used on the Great Nile Dam. Write us for 
interesting illustrated pamphlet regarding this wonderful work. 



B. & S. H. THOMPSON & CO 

LIMITED 

53 St. Sulpice Street, 

MONTREAL. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA. 



VARNISHES *hd JAPANS 

McCASKILL, DOUGALL & CO. 



Manufacturers 



MONTREAL 




Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Wont turn white from the effects of water and sun. 

Standard Piano, Furniture and Decorative Varnishes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and Varnishe?, 
Architectnral Varnishes 



OFFICES 



161 Summer St., 

BOSTON, Man., U.S.A. 



30 St John St., 

MONTREAL 



lfeither Fictitiouily Named Nor 
Exorbitant, 

Get LANGWELLS BABBIT, MONTREAL. 

w 




C£.HABlAty 



§j9 




O METAL / 



AlERCH* 



The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada 



VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 17, 1903. 



NO. 3. 




CORRUQATED IRON 



n 






ahm yy llest quality "Oueen's Head" grade 
vriD of galvanizing. 

I\L.D vLLI I J L Good ordinary galvanised 

QLOBE" j shee,s 

Also Black and Painted sheets, and flat 
sheets for corrugating. 



JOHN LY8AGHT. Limited, Makeri, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENO. Managers Canadian Branch. 




a 



Stafford" Radiators 



Manufactured for Hearing all 
classes of Buildings by Hot 
Water or Steam. Made in 
different heights, beautiful de- 
signs. Plain or Ornamental. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office and Works: DUFFERIN ST. " 



TORONTO, CAN. 



NEW 



CUTLERY 



% 



-AND- 



% 



TABLE GOODS 



ft 



*8 



# 



V 



*#> 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



Cor King and Victoria Streets, 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 



London and Liverpool, England. 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington St. West, ^TORONTO, ONT. 

We carry in stock a full line of the following goods: 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard. 
Rods and Tubes. 

Canada Plates. 

Copper — Bar and Ingot. 
Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Sheathing. Roofing and Brazier's. 

Copperine and Babbitt. 

Cotton Waste. 

Crucibles. 

Eave Trough — Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 
Galvanized, "Gordon Crown." 
Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 

Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 

Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 

Lead Pipe. 

Solder — Half and Half and Standard 

Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat. 

Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 

Tin — Bar. Ingot, ' L & F." and Straits. 

Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 

Zinc — Sheets and Block. 



INQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MKTAL 



THEYRE ALL ALIKE 



THAT'S THE BEAUTY OF THE 




BOOKLET 

COMING 

if you'll ask for 
a copy with 
trade discount. 



Jobbers. 

A. L. SILBERSTEIN 



Mfrs. of 



'32m 



Cutlery 



453-461 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY. 



GARDEN 
HOSE 

We solicit your enquiries for 
samples and prices for next season. 

Our line is complete, embracing 
the old lines with some new ones. 

All brands made with our Patent 
SeamleSS Tube to stand city pres- 
sures. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 

Hanufacturers of Rubber Goods, 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 



"YANKEE" 
HATCHET SCBEW DOIVER 

N5I5 





Oar " YANKEE " Tool B ook 
tells all about them. Mailed 



free on application. 



No. 15. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 



r~ 






4 



j_. 



_>_. 




No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand.L 




No. 41. Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




No. 50. 'Yankee'' Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel. Brass Wood etc. 



Manufacturers also ol 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIllAHD 
let Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 



k§3§P 



B*a> 



No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



WIRE 

1 OoYou Handle Wire? 

RWe manufacture and sell 
all kinds of Wire. 

I™ Hay-Baling Wire. 

Oiled and Annealed Wire. 

Plain Galvanized Wire. 

Galvanized Hard Coiled Spring 
Wire. 

IN CARLOADS, OR LESS THAN CARLOADS. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

Burgon & Ball, Limited 



TRAHE MARK 



Willi WIIiim Is 1N< ORl'OKATED 



(soundJJ Burgon & Wilkinson 






WIL 

KIN 
SON 




(Late Wm. Wilkinson A Sons.) 




Established 1730, and foremost ever since. Manufacturers of the celebrated 
BBA Sheep Shears, now made with special hollow ground razor edge, thereby 
saving grinding, as the blade can be worn down fully % of an inch without 
affecting the edge. These Shears hold the World's record, as 3,654 sheep 
were shorn with one pair. If your jobber does not carry them in stock, write 
for circulars and particulars to . . . 




lBADt MASK 



Decatur, Bull & Co., $**% 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

Sole Canadian Agents. 



; & 
WIL. 
KIN 

SON 



TRADE MABK 



Screen Door Hardware. 



NON-HOLDBACK) 



(HOLD-BACK) 



Made of 
High-Grade 

Steel 
Spring 



and in 
Various 
Finishes. 




Spring 
Hinges 

Strong 

and 

Handsomely 

Finished. 




STOCK 

Prompt 

SHIPMENTS. 



STAE COIL 
DOOR SPRING, 
Also the GEM. 



COLUMBIA 

Single and Double Acting. 



ACORN. 



TORREY ROD 
DOOR SPRING. 



FOR PRICES WRITE: 



The Columbian Hardware Co., Makers, Cleveland, ohio. 



r 



— »!!■ 



Lamplough & McNaughton 



gem wire door pull. 9 De Bresoles Street, 



CANADIAN SALES AGENTS, 

MONTREAL, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"Peerless Iceland" 



.' *y ;:: 




BEST OF 0030 FREEZERS. 
ERED GEARING ONE MOTION. 



FREEZER 

FOR 



Simply 
Wonderful 

IN RESULTS. 



Wonderfully 
Simple 

IN CONSTRUCTION 



1903. 



SEND FOR BOOKLET. 



ARE YOU IN DOUBT? 



Have you decided what line of freezers to stock for the approaching season ? If 
your decision is based upon merit you will undoubtedly prefer the "PEERLESS 
ICELAND," the freezer for which all wide-awake merchants are placing their 
orders. 

HAVE YOU INVESTIGATED the merits of the "Peerless Iceland"? Unlike most freezers it is 
simplicity itself owing to the few parts in its construction, at the same time 
accomplishing better results. The stationary dasher is the main feature, making 
it a one-motion freezer ; one motion being all that is required for the effective 
freezing of smooth, delicious ice cream. 

HAVE YOU PROSPERED in your freezer business during 1902 ? If not, the fault perhaps lies in the 
line handled. "Peerless Iceland " Freezers will insure profitable returns. No 
other freezer is more extensively advertised, no other freezer is in greater demand. 
Specify your wants now while prices are favorable, past experience shows that 
prices generally advance with the season. 



Lewis Bros. & Co. 



QUOTE 
LOW 



WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS, 

r Address all communications (<> MONTREAL 



TORONTO, 

87 YORK ST. 



SHIP 
QUICK 



OTTAWA, 

54 QUEEN ST. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RE-ACTING WASHER 




The quickest acting, readiest selling, and most generally satisfactory Rotary Washing 
.Machine on the market 

The only regret your customers will, have after buying one of these excellent machines 

is that they did not know about it sooner. 

They require them you should stock them we ean supply them. Order early. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., 

Limited 

HAMILTON. 

W. L HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal, Eastern Agents. 




THE 



ESTABLISHED 17 50 



TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS 
ROPERIE 



LEITH 



Cordage 




EVERY 

DESCRi 



pTlON 

OF 



& Canvas' 




1 

STEAMER 
CLOTH 

\m 

^5- and * 
WSAILC10TH% 
WCOMPANYjS 
^« lEITM/$- | 
/7SO 



MANILA ROPE 

SISAL ROPE 

NEW ZEALAND ROPE 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHING LINES 

NETTING TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS A PACKINGS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS nunnu ininta 

BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTMS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAULINCS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPINC TWINES 



1 

edinburgh] 
Waterproof, 



'# AND *o\ 

WSAILC10TH% 

uJCOMPANYE? 
^LEITH^ 
U5O 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE AND STORES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, • 9 St Peter Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



See! YouOon't Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do II. 




No 34 



Si— I 



(»»J 



kntKif pulic* I 



Qwwr j 



No 15 



No 39' 



No 14 



Ho.17 






NO IG 



Walker's Self=Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Wood Handles. 
EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. Ssveral Imitations on the market, but none as good. 
Mfrd. only by BRIE SPECIALTY CO., I:rie, Pa., U.S.A. 



IRON, 



We are headquarters for all kinds of new and 
old metals, babbitt, solder, etc. 



WANTED 



METALS, 



It will pay you to ask for 
our prices before buying. 



We pay highest market price for scrap metals. 
Write us when having anything for sale. 



RUBBER. 



FRANKEL BROS., 



92 Wellington St., MONTREAL. 

1 16-130 George St. TORONTO. 



Sausage Staffer, Lard 
and Frtrit Press 



S3. 



TRADE 



ENTERPRISE 



Meat and Food Choppers 



Meat Juice Extractor 






8 Sizes and Styles 

Rapid Grinding and 
Pulverizing Mills 
108 M and si iii > i 

for It'iml mill /'••!/ I T 




'mwi 



No. 3, $5.50. 

Bone, Shell and Corn 
Mill 




TINNED 

40 Size./ - and Style./" for Hand and Power 
from $1.00 to $300.00 





1 
i 

« . 

j 
I 

« Raisin Seeder 




No 12. $2.75. 
Sold by all the leading Jobbers of the Dominion 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE MAILED FREE 



No. 36. $1.00 



;Cold Handle Polishing 
IRON 



The Enterprise Mfg. Co. of P«x. 



No. 750. $7-50 



Philadelphia, Pa,., U. S. A. 




No. 82, $7.50 per dot. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 



THE MOST COMPLETE STOCK 



IT PAYS 



to buy our brown or manilla wrap- 
ping papers because you get value 
for value. 

livery order has 480 sheets to 
the ream and full weight. 

This Canadian-made paper equals 
anything on the market in quality. 

CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TINWARE AND UN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
Jacketed Oil Cans, 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Palls, Etc. 

JAS. A. McGOLPIN 

156-162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



Brass a nd Copper 



in Sheets, Tubes, Wire and Rod. 



Service Right, 
Quality Right. Prices Right 



THE LONDON SCALE WORKS 

OEOROE M. FOX 
(BaOCMKH io John Fox.) 

Manufacturer of Railroad, May and 
Platform Scales. 

91 York Street, ,— LONDON, ONT. 

Lockerby & McGomb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 

Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 

AND 

. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 

THE INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., Limited. 

TORONTO. 

Highest Award Pan - American Exposition. 



WATERBURY BRASS GO. 

122 to 130 Centre St., ■ New York City. 



Always have our classified Stock 
List before you. 

YOURS FOR THE ASKING. 




MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 



SISAL 
MANILA 



ROPE Lath Yarn ' Shin s |e Yarn ' H 
nx,r e-» Cord| p. Cord| c|othes Li 



BINDER TWINE 



Transmission Rope a Specialty. 



fn «— */t/^ i»»^e^^>* W gfotm+H 



*'^\s*\ 



Ask 

and 

Receive. 

Advertise 
and 
mire. 



If you want to sell 
a business or a de- 
livery wagon, if you 
want a partner or a 

clerk — advertise. 

If you have what 
you don't want, or 
haven't what you do 

want — advertise. 

Our condenstd 
m advertisements 

MCCjUlrc. cost little, but are 

worth a good deal. 
You can reach most of the hardware 
merchants in Canada at the expense of 
a ftrw cents. Our rate is 2c. per word 
each insertion, and remittance 
must accompany order in every case 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 



Qsy w^^. * ,.*^^«v»«rf^w^/SMi>^Vw^^**>»***»{3 




<£ Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 



post free to any part of the world 

PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Mel bourne 
Sydney, 
BRITISH OFFICES: 
London 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 



42 Cannon St., E.C. 
CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will ret*ive Prompt 
attention if addressed to the LONDON OFFICE, 42 CANNON 
STREET, E.C. 

Specimen Copies Free on Application. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RQ QVACC JP f^f\ PORT TALBOT, SOUTH WALES, 
. D. D T MOO 06 UU., GREAT BRITAIN. 

Largest MAKERS OF 

BEST SIEMENS STAMPING ENAMELLING 

BLACK PLATES, 

CIRCLES. RECTANGLES, Etc. 

MAKERS of all descriptions of STEEL SHEETS. 
Brands SKER, and SKER BEST." 

Sole Canadian Export Agents, 

ROBERT CROOKS & CO., Botolph House, 10, Eastcheap, LONDON, EC 



Cable address : " CROLLO." LONDON. 



IT PAYS TO INVEST 



.*A^V*i^k**^»**^l CA5HICR i » 4 "»'*S»*^aV^. 



IN OUR ORNAMENTAL 



Office Railings, Fences, Grills, 
Fire Dogs, Etc. 




Because they are 



Inexpensive 
Reliable 
Orna menta I 
Non-Tarnishable. 



Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 

Head Office: TORONTO, ONT. 

DI8TRII r OFFICES 
Montreal. Winnipeg, Halifax 



TO 




THE RETAIL HARDWARE DEALER 

re you carrying a stock of TWIST DRILLS ? 



There is a good trade to be done in handling the New Process Twist Drills. 




^/j These are hot-forged Drills. The best part of the steel is not cut out and thrown away. 
^J They are superior in every respect to the ordinary milled Drill. 




These goods are guaranteed to be as represented, and we replace free of charge any 
tool found defective in material or workmanship. 



WRITE AND GET PRICES 



THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 



SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS 



MONTREAL 



VANCOUVER 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




A COMPARISON 



TRASH 



j& 



A cheap mantle gives a fair- 
light for a few nights, then 
grows dim and shiinks np 
to a u wasp-waist" like this : 

This is caused by the cheap 
chemicals which the manufac- 
turer used. 



The 
"Wasp 

Waist" 



QUALITY 




A good mantle, 
which cannot shrink, made of 
the purest chemicals, is the only kind we 
put our trade mark A on. It guarantees 
you /HL the best that is 
made and will satisfy your 
customers. 

Lowest prices on mantles, shades, 
chimneys, globes and sundries. 

Write us if you are interested.. 

AUER LIGHT CO., MONTREAL. 




S*~K 




"GLOBE- -POLISH 




INSIST ON HAYING IT 

Write for a supply of show cards and advertising novelties. 

RAIMES & CO., 164 Duane St., NEW YORK. 



Supplies for the Maple Syrup Season. 




Sap Buckets . . . 

-EXTRA DEEP AND STRAIGHT. 
-THREE SIZES. 

They possess many advantages over the ordinary 
flaring Buckets — being small in diameter they do not 
catch the rain or snow, and as they are very deep, 
they hang perpendicularly, and consequently will 
not overflow until full. 

— Covers supplied if required. 

— They nest close for shipping or storing. 

We can also supply the ordinary Flaring or 
Western Sap Pails. 



E. T. Sap Spouts. 

MADE OF RETINNED STEEL-STRONfj AND DURABLE. 

Only require a |^-in. hole in tree. 

It does not cover the inside surface of the hole ; therefore 
a larger amount of sap is obtained. 
Packed in card-board boxes. 




Maple Leaf 

Sap Spouts. 




Made ID Bionzed Steel. 

Require a l /i -in. hole. 

Has a shoulder which prevents it being 
diiven in too far. 

The hole in the tree is not exposed to wind 
and snow ; consequently, sap will How longer. 

Packed in card-board boxes. 




Syrup Cans, round or square. 

Plain or decorated. Made in % , %, and i gallon sizes. 

Either Wine or Imperial Measure-. 

A full stock carried in all lines ; orders shipped promptly. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 



i-rlllfc 



II1K 



TORONTO, CANADA. 




VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 17, 1903. 



NO. 3 



President : 

JOHN BAYNB MacLEAN. 

Montreal. 

Ihc Had ran Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES, 

232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

ioq Fleet Street, E.C. 

W. H, Miln. 

- 18 St. Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

- Western Canada Block. 

J.J. Roberts. 

- Flack Block. 

J. A. Macdonald. 

No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

Room 802 New York Life Bldg. 



Montreal - 

["ORONTO 

London, eng. 

M \n. HESTER, Km 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver, B.C. 
St. John, N.B. - 

New York 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 
Cable Address I A ^P; ; ^on- 

EUROPEAN RAIL CONVENTION. 

IN view of 1 hi. 1 controvers) aroused by 
the purchase of German steel rails bj 
Mackenzie & Mann and the proposal to 
lew a dut) on foreign rails, the business 
methods of German and other European 
railmakers should be understood bj the 
Canadian public. 

For some time the German rail-pro- 
ducers have had .1 syndicate, the prime 
object of which is to maintain prices on 
the home market .it a satisfactory level, 
which has been no easj matter owing to 
die industrial crisis there. To do 1 1 1 1 — it 
i-. of course, advantageous to export as 
mam rails as possible. To do this the 
syndicate has provided a fund, contributed 



to In its members, from which a liberal 
bount) to an) manufacturers sending rails 
to a foreign countrj will be paid. The 
exact amount of this bount} is nol known 
to outsiders, bul it is believed to be siboul 
$6 per ton. 

Now, according to a German paper, a 
scheme is being promoted for the for- 
mation of a 1. 11I convention between 
the rail-producers of Germany, Eng- 
land and Belgium. The German works 
interested in the question include such 
well-known companies as the Bochum 
Union, the Dortmund Union, Krupp, 
Phoenix, Horde, rlosch, Wendal and Co., 
the Rhenish Steel Works, Stumm Bros., 
the Dudlingen Ironworks, Deutscher 
Kaiser and others, and these have formed 
a central export bureau, to which all 
inquiries for rails from abroad will he for- 
warded b) the companies concerned. 

It i- safe lo presume that sueh a con- 
vention, when thorough!} organized, will 
not fail to take steps to conserve its own 
interests .md to the disadvantage of rail- 
makers not included in it-- membership. 



ADVANTAGES OF TRADE JOURNALS 
"\ \ 'IlKN the business of a merchant 
\ > ha- reached such a point that 
everything runs smoothly, the merchant 
should he able to afford a few spare mo- 
ment-- to spend in stud} and thus advance 
his views and broaden his understanding 
-o that he will he able to take a more pro- 
minent part in public affairs and devote his 
energies to better advantage in the service 
of the State. And no merchant can better 
himself mote than In reading the various 



trade periodicals, weekl} 01 monthly, 
which are issued for the benefit ol each 
branch of the trade. 

He should not confine himself !<■ one 
trade papei alone, hut should take two or 
three. Thus his views may he widened 
and his powers of thought stimulated and 

expanded. The more Ik- knows ahout his 

trade thi better, and a well-informed man 
has an air of culture about him that makes 
his pi rsonality attractive. 

IK should not wait until his trade i- 
quiel before reading the various trade 
periodicals that come his way, hut should 
endeavor to advance his view- at everv 
Opportunity, and lake time to study the 
market report- and the articles on the suc- 
cessful methods of conducting business 
that are to he found in these periodicals. 

I!v watching the accurate market re- 
ports in the trade publications much 
money ma} he saved in buying and selling. 
There mav he indications of ,tn advance in 
priee of some commodit) which these 
papers will report, and the merchant 
being forewarned i- often enabled to buy 
to advantage before the advance takes 
plaee. And, also, there mav he indica- 
tions of a decline in some article which, if 
the merchant beforehand perceives, he mav 
dispose of hi- -in phi- stock In .1 sp 
-ak before thi depreciation in prict taki- 
place. 

A- a proof of the advantage 1 hi reading 
of trade periodicals is to the men haul, it 
mav he pointed out that those who make 
a practice of reading them .ire always en- 
thusiastic in their praise. 



Hardware ami Mela! 



KMTOIMAI. 



COAL AS A RECIPROCAL POSSIBILITY. 



IF there is one article of merchandise in 
.ml to which Canada and the 
United States should be able to enter into 
reciprocal arrangements it is coal. In 
mam other articles there is a conflicting 
of interests. The manufacturers in the 
United States want, for example, easier 
access to the Canadian market. The 
manufacturers in this country, on the 
other hand, favor legislation that would 
have the verj opposite tendency. The 
same principle actuates the farmers on 
both sides of the boundary line. 

In regard to coal the same difficulties do 
not exist, or at any rate in so pronounced 
a form. 

In the New England States the manu- 
facturers and gas-making concerns find it 
necessary to draw upon the mines of Nova 
Scotia for a great deal of their bituminous 
coal in spite of a duty of <>7c. per long 
ton. This is on account of the great dis- 
tance thev are away from the coal fields of 
Pennsylvania. A duty of <i7c. a ton is 
even less of an obstacle. 

Ontario, on the other hand, is wholly 
dependent on the coal mines of Pennsyl- 
vania, Ohio, and West Virginia for its 
supplv. Nova Scotian coal is a perfect 
stranger in Ontario. Some years ago a 
cargo did reach Brockville, on the St. 
Lawrence, but it was the only one, while 
Toronto, Hamilton, and other cities in the 
western part of the Province never saw a 
pound of Nova Scotian coal. Not even 
during the recent period of scarcity was it 
in ev idence. 

Here then is the chief manufacturing 
Province in Canada dependent on the coal 
of the neighboring republic, while the 
chief manufacturing States in the Amer- 
ican Union find their natural source of 
supplv in Nova Scotia. On the Pacific 
Coast the natural source of supply is the 
coal mines of British Columbia. 

The tariff on butuminous coal in both 
countries has protection to the home 
product as its object. There is no doubt 
about it. But as far as the coal trade 
between this country and the United 
States is concerned, the respective tariffs 
can scarcely be termed protective. They 



may be revenue producing, but that was 
not the expediency that brought them into 
existence. It is obvious therefore that ttte 
revenue is the only thing that would suffer 
in either country should the tariff on 
butuminous coal be concurrently removed. 

Last year Canada imported from the 
United States a little over 3,000,000 tons 
of butuminous coal, valued at $5,627,695, 
while her exports to that country were 
1,589,469 tons, valued at $4,318,681. Of 
anthracite coal, on which there is no duty, 
we imported from the United Stales 
1,6*2,451 tons, valued at $7,021,939. 

The action of Congress, on January 14, 
in adopting a Bill allowing a rebate for 
one year on all bituminous coal imported 
into the L'nited States should make a 
reciprocal arrangement between the two 
countries more possible. In the meantime 
the Dominion Government, as an evidence 
ol its good intention, should take advan- 
tage of the authority given it under the 
Customs Tariff of 1897, to reduce the 
duty on United Stales bituminous coal to 
40c. per long ton. The present dutv on 
the long ton is 60c. 

TheTorontoWorld objects to reciprocity 
in soft coal, because it would be an inter- 
ference with the principles of protection. 
Is the editor not a bit crude in his notions 
of protection ? 

The two chief elements of protection are 
(I) a tariff on goods that could be manu- 
factured in the country; (2) a free list for 
raw material that has to be got out of the 
country. Soft coal is a very important 
element to our manufacturers. 



RED TAPE AND MISTRUST IN THE 
POST OFFICE. 

SIR WILLIAM MULOCK, as Post- 
master-General, has made many 
useful and important changes in the ad- 
ministration of his Department, but there 
is something for him to do vet. We 
laugh at the amount of red tape and the 
absence of common sense among the per- 
manent officials of the British Post Office 
Department, but are we any better here? 
A leading manufacturer recently went 
to considerable expense for an attractive 
in 



catalogue one that was a credit to Cana- 
dian enterprise. It was important that it 
be put in the hands of those interested in 
as neat and clean a condition as possible. 
He had special boxes made for it an ad- 
ditional expense. 

When it was taken to the posl office he 
was fust informed he must pay double 
postage, on account of some technicality 
on which a recent ruling had been made. 
He was prepared to pay that. Then the 
post office officials said the catalogues 
could not be sent out unless I he box were 
open at both ends, so that thev could see 
the contents. The manufacturer offered 
lo go before a magistrate and swear that 
there was nothing but a catalogue in each 
package; but (hat had no effect. Then 
it was suggested that the post office peo- 
ple might open a package here and there- 
in the lot to satisfy themselves, even if 
they would not believe a reputable manu- 
facturer under oath 

" Very sorry," was the explanation, 
" but you know we have never done that," 
in a tone that meant that therefore it never 
could be done. 

The catalogues now lie in the manu- 
facturer's office addressed, but still un- 
m ailed. 

Any business man will buy a whole car- 
load or several carloads of cheese or butter 
or grain or other commodity without 
even looking at it on the basis of a small 
sample package — often supplied by the 
seller. Post Office rules forbid any such 
common sense principle, even when the 
authorities actually handle each individual 
package. 

How much more business-like is the 
way the Customs Department deals in 
matters of that kind — in circumstances 
where it is of far greater importance to 
know the contents of a package, so that 
there will be no fraud on the revenue. In 
the case of the ordinary business man only 
a package here and there is opened 
often a whole shipment is passed for a 
well-known importer without even being 
looked at. 

A foreign invoice is accepted by the 
Customs Department, but the oath of a 
well-known Canadian manufacturer is re- 
fused by the Posi Office officials. 



KMTOK'I \l. 



ffunin >tt . .!»(*/ U. t.tl 



LEAD MINERS AND CONSUMERS. 

THE question of placing .1 highei rate 
of dutv on lead has been brought 
more forcibj) Lhan ever before the large 
dealers .md consumers of Canada bj the 
arrival In Montreal on January \< ol .1 
deputation from British Columbia repre 
senting the lead-mining industry of the 
West 

The deputation consists of Mi. John I.. 
Retallack, of the Lead Silver Miners' 
Association of Easl and West Kootenaj ; 
Messrs. (n'o. Alexandei and Geo. D. 
Potter, of the Lead Miners' Committee, 
and Mr. G. O. Buchanan, who represents 
the various Boards of Trade of the Kooten- 
ays. At a meeting ol lead miners in 
Sandon, B.C., a resolution aiming toward 
a higher tariff on lead was passed, which 
this deputation will support. 

The) looked for the support of the paint 
manufacturers, load pipe manufacturers, 
etc., in the cast, and in a measure thej 
have it. Before the) stated their case the 
general feeling among those interested in 

the industry was in favor of the Western 
gentlemen ; but it appears that the dut) 

which the) will ask the Government for is 

much higher than would he approved ol" 
in the east. The visitors desire a dut) of 
I '-c. per lb. on lead ore, 2 ' m\ per lb. on 
lead in bullion, and 2#C. per lh. on lead 

sheets, pipe or shot. 

On the other hand, the Montreal manu- 
facturers would want no more than Jfc. 
per lb. on lead pipe, plus the present duty 
ol" 35 per cent.; on dry while lead I Me. 
per lb., and on red lead and litharge the 
same. 

• The #Y. per lb. on pig lead which the 
eastern lead Consumers ask for would 
mean a protection to the Western miners 
of about 30 per cent., which, in the opinion 

oi Eastern Canada lead consumers, includ- 
ing manufacturer! Of lead pipe, shot, Jrv 
while lead and while lead ground in oil. is 

enough. The dutv which the mining 

men want would amount to about 7-"> per 

cent., which, considering that freight rates 

from Mritish Columbia east are mm h 

greater than those from Great Britain, 
German) or the United states, would 
place the manufacturers of Canada in a 
bad position. 



Thei e .hi iii In i i on tidi i ation*. whit h 
weigh with the manufacturers in deciding 
against an excessive rate ol dutv. The 
result oi a high tariff iii the United States 
has been tli.it , while the lead business has 
passed out of the hands of the pain) manu- 
facturers and into those of the lead pro- 
ducers, the same would, perhaps, be the 

• .1-1 here if the hi^l" tarifl undi i vv hi. h 
the lead miners wish to woik were pill 

into fi 

Speaking to a representative of this 
paper on the subject, one large paint 
manufacturer said : "As manufacturers, 

we, of course, believe in ample protection 

to all Canadian industries thai are worth 
protection, and we sympathize with the 
Western lead-mining people to a certain 
extent. The Government has been more 
than once asked to aid certain industries, 
which could never be put on a paying 
basis in this coiintrv, and I am glad that 

the) refused. As regards the lead-mining 
industry in Canada, it is questionable 
whether il is advisable at this dale to 
attempt to make it a great on>.- bv a change 
in the tariff, which cannot but increase the 
price to the consumer, and would be a 
long time before the Canadian market 
would be sufficient to absorb the present 
production of the British Columbian mines. 
" I think the outside quantity of white 
lead thai could be used in Canada al pres- 
ent would be about 12. nun tons annually. 
The British Columbian mines if I am not 

mistaken are able to produce 100, ' tons 

annually. That means that while they 
would sill I 2,000 tons at as high a price 
as they could under the tariff, to Canadian 
buyers, they would be forced lo dispose of 
88,000 tons On the United States market 

tor the) could hard!) send any quantit) 
accross the ocean and on any market 
outside of Canada they would have to 
meet the competition ol" the world. The 
same is the case in the United Slates. 
Foreign buyers get their lead from Ameri- 
can manufacturers at about hall" the price 
the American himself has to pay. 

" \d mailer what protection the British 
Columbian mining people gel the) could 
not SUppI) Eastern Canada consumers as 
cheapl) as we gel the lead now. Although, 
personally, I am willing to pa) a little 
more fof white lead to aid our own mines 
in obtaining control of this market, il" that 
is possible, I am not willing to be placed 
in such a position rli.it our Western friends 
can, if the) wish, 'put the sdrews on us' 

II 



and maki us pa) an exui bitaul i 
without having recoursi to tin Vmeri 
German "i English market I hat would 
be I'm condition I think if the dut) i« » • 
which this deputation is asking came into 

"lln Vmerican lead-mining busim 
in a comparative!) flourishing condition, 
and it is protection that caused it, so why 

should not OUI mines In aided as will.' 
Bul what I i all a protective tariff is one 

thai is high enough to protei t tin- home 
manufacturei from the foreign, and also 
low enough to give protection to the home 
consumer against the manufacturei in his 
ow n countr) 

The delegates nut the Montn al iii.un h 
of the Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion on Saturday morning and dis 1 usscd 
the mailer. C>n Suiidav evening the) left 

foi Ottawa to interview the Government. 



IMPROVE YOUR BUSINESS. 
r I "*HE stock-taking time of the ve.u is 

X I he season w hen I he merchant should 

also exercise some self-examination as to 
his methods of transacting business. 

He should carefull) look over his books, 
investigating in what lines his sales have 

fallen off and where the) have increased. 
A remedy should he found for an) decline 
in sales he may have experienced, and 
care taken to avoid in future the mistakes 
of the past. 

The clerks should be careful!) studied 
and an effort made to improve their weak 
points and to stimulate them to greater 
exertions. Ability and merit should be 
recognized with a substantial reward, and 
carelessness and extravagance should not 
be passed over without the possessor being 
al least admonished to mend his ways. 
The employer should think out in what 
way his clerks may be improved and how 
their faults may be checked and obliter- 
ated. 

Another thing that should be observed 
is carefulness in checking off invoices and 
in receiving goods from the manufacturei 
or wholesaler. Every article that comes 
into your store should be counted, weighed 
or measured. Likewise every article yoinf,' 
out of I he store should be examined lo see 
that it is what it is represented to be. ,\ni\ 
that neither too much or loo little is hcin^ 
delivered to the customer. Everything, 

no matter how trifling, should be looked 

into, and leakages prevented 

possible. The scales should be kepi well 
dusted and tl»c counters clean 

There will usual!) be found man) other 
things that need looking alter by the 

merchants during the coming year. 



Hardnnre and Metal 



^^^^itrt^^^^^^^^^^^tt^^rt^^^^^^^rt^^^^^rtji.'fi'ft^. 4 ^.^^ 






COMMENT ON CURRENT TOPICS. 



* 

* 

* 






'"I'M IE mercury and the price of coal 
^ evidentlj do not desire to keep com- 
pany these days. As the one goes down 
the other goes up. 

* * * 
The National Board of Trade of the 
United States convened at Washington 
on Tuesday, It is to be hoped it will 
exhibit more signs of life than the Do- 
minion Hoard of Trade, which met in 
Ottawa la>t summer. 



The anthracite railroads lost, it is com- 
puted, $57,000,000 during the six months 
of the coal strike. This alone is sufficient 
to teach the evil results of strikes. But, 
unfortunately, this is not the only loss 
which affected* industrial life, to sav noth- 
ing of the great discomforts that are being 
experienced in a threat many homes all 
oxer this continent because of an inade- 
quate supply of fuel. 

* * * 

It is rather amusing to read some ol' 
the letters which the London correspon- 
dents of the New York papers are cabling 
to their respective journal regarding the 
Bosphorus. "Nothing better, perhaps, 
coukJ be expected of the Sultan," writes 
one correspondent, ''but Western Europe 
wants to know, and the inquiry is equally 
interesting to the United States, whether 
a pledge given by Russia must here- 
after be regarded as subject to any evasion 
which trickery or subterfuge can furnish." 
And yet, while these correspondents are so 
orthodox in their views regarding the inter- 
national agreement of the European powers 
touching the Bosphorus, there is a strong 
movement on foot in the United States to 
break, in spirit, at least, the international 
agreement with Great Britain regarding 
warships on the Great Lakes. 

* # * 

Mr. A. L. Sifton has been appointed 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of 
the Northwest Territories. Prior to his 
appointment he was Commissioner of 
Public Works and Treasurer of the Terri- 
tories, appears to be a man of ability, and 
carries after his name the " terminal 
initials "of M.A. and LL.B. But it is to 
be regretted that he is the brother of Hon. 
Clifford Sifton, Minister of the Interior in 
the Dominion Cabinet. Not that there is 
anything to be said against the latter as a 



man or a Minister. On the contrary, 
there is a great deal more to be said in 
his favor than his political opponents are 
prepared to concede. But the appoint- 
ment savors of nepotism, although, of 
course, the appointment comes through 
the Department of Justice and not that ot 
the Interior. Even the suspicion of nepo- 
tism is unpleasant, and it woidd be better 
if both political parties avoided its very 

appearance. 

* * * 

There was a meeting in Toronto on 
Monday to discuss church union. With 
industrial union and church union we 
ought to be getting near the "harmonious 
whole"; but then we might find ourselves 
in a worse hole. 



It is said that Mr. V. Coffee, of London, 
is likely to get the vacant Toronto Sena- 



A VOICE FROM THE YLJKOM. 
The Yukon Hardware Co., Limited, Dawson, Yukon 
Territory, writing under (lute of December 22, say : 
"Hardware and Mktal has been of great assis- 
tance to us from the fact that we are always kept 
posted on the Eastern prices, and we know that it 
will render us the same assistance in the future." 



torship. He certainly ought to be accept- 
able to the grocery trade. 

* * * 

Toronto has a new mayor with a new 
policy. The latter promises to be vigorous. 
Whether it will be weak and puny at the 
end of the term, like other similar policies, 
remains to be seen. It is to be hoped it 

will not. 

* * # 

Mayor Urquhart of Toronto began life 
as a clerk in his father's general store. 
His downward path in life, which ended 
in his election as chief magistrate of the 
"Queen City," began when he left the 
store and entered the lawyer's office. But 
he can redeem himself by conducting the 
affairs of the city on the same lines as his 
father did his store on business lines. 



With the Ontario Government five up 
and His Majesty's Loyal Opposition five 
down the Province of Ontario ought to 
get good Government. A strong Opposi- 
tion is as essential "to good Government 
12 



as a strong Administration. There may 
not be much consolation in this for the ■• 
parly five down, but there is for the 

Province. 

* * * 

The three-fold wind from the north on 
January 7 was laden with balm for the 
Ross Government but with frost for the 
Whitne) Opposition. 



A cable despatch says that Mr. Edison 
has ordered ore crushing machines in 
Coatbridge, Scotland, claiming they are 
cheaper and belter than those made in the 
United Slates. It is to be hoped that this 
is not an invention, as newspapermen, as 
well as men of Mr. Edison's stamp, are 
sometimes given to invention. 



The lumber mills in the Ottawa district 
have advanced their prices 10 per cent. 
Lumber has been getting dearer for some- 
time, which may account for the scarcity 
of planks in the platforms of the political 

parlies. 

•*• # * 

According to the annual report of I he 
Eisheries Department just issued at 
Ottawa, the pack of salmon in British 
Columbia last year was 025,982 cases. 
Although only about half that of last year, 
one gathers some idea of the labor entailed 
in putting up that many cases when it is 
remembered that it meant the catching of 
over 5,000,000 salmon. There are 11 to 
12 salmon in a case. 

# * -it- 

Canada, in Federal, Provincial and 
municipal bonuses and loans, has paid out 
in cold cash over $228,500,000 to the rail- 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipmeati 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



COMMENT ON ill 



JHK^" 



ways. And yel the railways own the 
countrj and iu>i the countrj the railways. 

* * # 

Six hundred guests sal down i<> .1 ban- 
quet of horse flesh, in Paris, one da) las) 
week. To a good man) ii will, iu> doubt, 
nppeai an assinine Feast. Apropos ol this 
incident it might be mentioned that, dur- 
ing the ventilation of a case in .1 Hull, 
Eng., court the other day, the fact was 
developed that <- >t ^1 and decrepid horses 
were being shipped to the continent, evi- 
dent!) for the purpose of being turned into 
sausages and other mysterious food pro- 
ducts. 

* * * 

It is said that there is now a probabilit) 
that the Bill before Congress to grant 
reciprocity with Cuba will carry, the 
beet-sugar interests having withdrawn 
their active opposition. Why this sudden 
magnanimit) ? Is there a consideration 
or understanding at the bottom of it ? 

* * * 

Sir Wilfrid Laurie'r lias returned to 
Ottawa from his sojourn at Hoi Springs. 
Although he is looking better, and evi- 
dent!) is better, gossip's tongue is still 
wagging about his possible retirement. 
Sir Wilfrid himself laughs at the idea. 
But men in similar positions have laughed 
before and retired. His retirement would 
ho a loss to the country as well as to the 
part) o\ which he is chief. And good 
men we cannot afford to lose whatever 
their political stripes may be. At any rate, 
political stripes arc not the man. 

* # ♦ 

Another tempest in a teapot appears to 
be brewing in the Mast. Servia and Bul- 
garia seem to be preparing for something 
and Russia's unarmed torpedo boats have 
passed through the Bosphorus in spite o( 
treaties prohibiting such practices. It is 
this latter affair thai threatens to create 
the tempest, particular!) in view o\ the 
fad that Great Britain, one o\ the treat) 
powers, has entered a protest. Neither 
Prance or Germany, however, have yel 
made any mow in the matter. Further- 
more, it is not likely they will. France it 
will be remembered is an ally ot Russia 
and German) a particular friend of Tur- 
key. Bv an agreement with the Powers 
after the Crimean War Turkey was main- 
tained in her rijjfht to prevent warships 
from passing through the straits in time 
o( peace. And in 1871, under a new 

treaty, this right was confirmed, although 

Russia was permitted to huild and main- 
tain warships on the Black Sea. Hut 
whether single-handed or in company 
Great Britain is not likely to go to war 







1 



lluiil., H rr nmt I/. In 



-} 



Mar - Not 

k DURABLE FLOOR VARNISH. 

Has all the qualities that 
make fast friends of the 
painter and the house- 
holder. 



Strongly advertised in a systematic advertising cam- 
paign, and of the highest quality, it is a splendid trade 
getter. It will satisfy you and your trade. 





P\L'.!_ T is n g nt > n body, and light in color, and is 



absolutely unequalled as a perfect floor finish. 
It is durable —does not mar or scratch easily. 
Write for information regarding it. 

|17//£ Sherwin-Williams Co. 




PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND, 



CHICAGO. 
NEW YORK, 



NEWARK. 
MONTREAL, 



BOSTON, 
TORONTO. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY. 




over the aits o\ Russia, whereby, in spirit 

at any rate, the stipulations of the various 
treaties drawn up by the Towers have 
been broken. Clival Britain has just 
emerged from one expensive war and cer- 
tainly will not relish another. And then 
il is only three or four years since Lord 

Salisbury told us that in going to war 

with Russia in 1864 Great Britain had 
put her money o\t the wrong horse. 



The powers have notified China that she 
must pay her indemnity in gold. And it 

looks as if she will have as much difficult) 

in finding the yellow metal as most of us 

have in finding money to pay our coal bills. 

* * * 

Great Britain's foreign trade during the 
past vear increased bv ;£(J, 870,086 in im- 
ports and £&,&\7,Q/04 in exports. John 
Bull is evidently still doint^ business at the 

old stand. 

* ♦ * 

The Bank o( Montreal has decided to 
raise its capital stock toSl ».< This 

is an increase of $2,000,000. It is a grow- 
ing time with the Bank of Montreal as 
well as everything else in Canada except 
the bankruptcy list. 

13 



Governor Hill, o\ Maine, is strongly 
opposed lo the Hay-Bond treaiv. He 
says its ratification would result in serious 
injury to Maine's fishing interests. Thus 
do local interests continue to try and 
thwart what is obviously for the general 
tfood. And then only to think of it : The 
local interest is territory which Canada 
was euchred out ol some 60 years ago. 
* ♦ * 

Toronto is to have an all-Canadian ex- 
hibition, and it is to be hoped all Canada 
will lake an interest in il. 



PROMPT SHIPMENT FOR SPRING 
TRADE. 

> kh's Toronto brushes and brooms 
and Cane's Newmarket woodenware are 
known throughout Canada both bv dealer 
and consumer. Never before have united 
factories been in a better position to fill 
orders. Prompt shipment can be assured 
now for the Spring trade. When rush o( 
trade comes on a little later this may be 

more difficulty. Wise dealers, there! 

should consider the question ot placing 
orders earl) for these read) Belli 

Moosomin and Warn II. i, N.W.T., have 

been connected by telephone. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BRITISH COLUMBIA PROSPERING. 

»« / T*HE lasi year," said Campbell 
Sweeney, managei o( the Bank 
of Montreal, "has been a good one for 
Vancouver, ;mJ ii seems to me that t he 
next promises to be even better. The 
lumber .mJ shingle industries are having 
a boom, and an) one who knows of ilio 
years of depression in that trade will agree 
that they are benefiting from a prosperty 
thai the lumbermen and millmen are en- 
titled to. Jobbing houses are building up 
a fine trade, and prospects are v^ry bright 
" For British Columbia generally, this 
last year has witnessed much genuine pro- 
gress. In Nelson, which is the commer- 
cial headquarters of tile upper country, 
business has been very good. Of course 
the depression in the lead industry has re- 
sulted in mam of the mines remaining 
closed, hut the mine-owners are taking 
action to induce the Government to legis- 
late tor their benefit. The commencement 
o\ zinc shipments has opened what is 
really a new industry, and if suitable 
freight rates can be secured, the buyers 
down in Kansas believe that a large busi- 
ness may be built up. In Boundary, the 
mining camps are humming, and the in- 
dustry there has had a very profitable 
year. Around Rossland, mining is on a 
pay-roll basis, and while so many conflicting 
statements have been made that people 
hardly know what to believe regarding 
plans of the companies, the general pros- 
pects are good, and the mine managers 
seem to be confident. But all over the 
Province, people have reason to be well 
satisfied with the results of the year's busi- 
ness, and there is nothing to be discour- 
aged about for the next." 



CAREER OF TORONTO'S NEW 
MAYOR. 

Mayor Thomas Urquhart, of Toronto, 
is -14 \ears of age. He was born in Wal- 
lacetown, in Elgin county, and left school 
when he was 13 years of age. His first 
employment was in his father's general 
store, where he remained for 10 years. 
When he was 21 years of age he was ap- 
pointed clerk of the Township of Dunwich, 
where he studied municipal law and 
became an authority upon drainage. This 
was his first taste of law. Two years 
later, after private study, he passed his 
matriculation examination. A few months 
later he came to Toronto, and became a 
junior in the firm of McCarthy <S: Osier. 
He was called to I he bar in |kh(;, and 
entered the linn of Mills, Heigh ington & 
Urquhart. The firm later became Heigh- 
ington, Urquhart & Boyd. In \hd-2. the 
firm became Urquhart & Urquhart, his 
partner bein^ his brother, I) Urquhart. 



WORTH KNOWING. 



There is not a revolver made ttm 
possesses safety features equal to those 
t<> be found in every Automatic 



IVER JOHNSON REVOLVER. 




Do you Know that an acci- 
dental discharge of this revol- 
ver is absolutely impossible ? 

Do y 0vl Know that this fact, to- 
gether with general excellence, is re- 
sponsible for the building up of the 
largest revolver manufacturing business 
in the world ? 



It is. and what more could be said? 
The Iver Johnson. Bicycle is another of OUT products, and its 

superiority is universally acknowledged. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



New York Salesroom : 99 Chambers St. 



FITCHBURG, MA8S. 



WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very 



liberal. 



A trial order solicited. Write for discounts. 



s. 



99 Niagara St., TORONTO FILfc CO. 

CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS 



s. 



A BAST I IM 




ALABASTINE lias been on the market for more than twenty years, and is known to be reliable. Is ihoioughly 
fdvertised, and in demand. To sell anything else for coating walls, it must necessarily be on the recommendation that 
it is the sarge thing, or last as good as Alahastlne. 

MONEY MADE in an effort to sell goods for which there is no demand, and that have no special merit, is paper 
money, without the Government stamp. Real profit comes by selling what the people want and call for. 

ALABASTINE is ready for use by the addition of cold water, made so by the inventor, Mr. M. B. Church, who 
was the first to produce a cold-water preparation that is thoroughly practical, that has superseded all hot-water mix- 
lures and forced other manufacturers to undertake the use of the cold water process, which process is protected by 
Canadian Letters Patent. 

ALABASTINE hardens with 'age, and repeated coats may be added from time to time without the necessity o 
removing old coats when desired to renew. This effects a great saving to the user. 

ALABASTINE is made in Canada, by Canadian labor, and from rock taken from Canadian mines. The trade 
supplied by Wholesale Hardware and Paint Dealers Also by 



THE ALABASTINE CO., LIMITED, 



PARIS, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 




37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 

Lumber men's Supplies. 



Qrab Hooks. 



J 
I 







Repair Links. 



■■GKj SILVER STEEL*^) 

PATE NT ^ ^ RA ^D >G«°UND- 

LANCE TOOTH 



Saw Sets. 





bawsou " Boot Calks. 



Coil Guam. 




-— - , 



■ «i ■ 



Pike Poles. 



Cant Hooks 



Peavies. 




LIMITED 

ONLY 
WHOLESALE 




Slide Hooks. 




Chopping Axes. 




■ Witman's' - Boot Calks 



- ,-■ *4 




PROMPT 
SHIPMENT 



FOR FULLER DESCRIPTION OF ABOVE LINES. SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. u«i«o. Toronto. 

Orahanr* Nails sre the Best. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE MIGHT. 



^•otory : Duff«rln Sunpt Toronto 

15 



Hordtrarf imtl Mftnl 



% 



MACHINERY 




DEVELOPMENT OF NIAGARA POWER. 

Bj Harlan \V. Brush, United States Consul at Niagara Kails, Out. 



TBE most important development of 
the year in thisconsular district is the 
enlarged pro'duetion of electric power 
at Niagara Falls. This has been in use at 
Niagara Falls, N.Y., for several years past, 
and the demand for this cheap and con- 
stant power has been so urgent that it 
has been impossible for the power com- 
pany to keep pace with it. The orig- 
inal development of 50,000 horsepower 
at Niagara Falls, N.V., was utilized some 
time ago, and the company have been work- 
ing night and day to double the capacity of 
the plant, the tunnel providing for a dis- 
charge of water that would develop 100,000 
horsepower. The second shaft has been 
completed, the machinery has been installed, 
and within a few months the full capacity 
of the Niagara Falls, N.V.. plant will be at 
the service of the Niagara frontier. 

Realizing that the plant on the New York 
side of the cataract would only suffice for a 
short period, the power company com- 
menced operations on the Canadian side of 
the river in August of last year. The work 
has been pushed rapidly, and it is expected 
that by next August 50,000 horsepower 
will be available. Already, the demand is 
so great that last week the power company 
let a contract for extending the wheel pit at 
once, so as to develop 110,000 horsepower 
instead of the 50,000 first contemplated. 
The two companies are practically identical 
as to stockholders, the Canadian company 
being officially designated as the Canadian 
Niagara Tower Company. 

A radical departure from the installa- 
tion on the New York side of the river is 
the utilization of dynamos of 10,000 horse 
power each instead of the 5,000 units that 
were installed in the original power house. 
The 5,000-horsepower dynamos were such 
mammoth experiments that it was feared 
they would prove impracticable, but now 
thev are to be succeeded by dynamos of 
twice their capacity. Quite a marked sav- 
ing is effected in the construction of a 10,- 
000 horsepower dynamo over two of 5,000 
each. 

The fact that cheap Niagara power is 
going to do all that was claimed for it in 
theway of attractingindustrial concerns to 
the Niagara frontier is being so thoroughly 
demonstrated that a second company— The 
Ontario Power Company — has secured 



rights from the Ontario Government. The 
development of its plant commenced last 
April, and 50,000 horsepower will be the 
initial product, but this will be increased to 
150,000 horsepower. Instead of being car- 
ried in an underground tunnel, the water is 
directed into flumes, carried to the brink of 
the Niagara gorge, and then dropped into 
the river through penstocks, which develop 
the power. 

These two companies are backed almost 
exclusively by United States capital. A 
third company, which claims to be wholly 
Canadian, has applied to the Government 
for the privilege of developing 100,000 
horsepower near the two plants now under 
construction. A full hearing of all the 
parties interested was given by the Govern- 
ment on Friday, December 19, at Toronto, 
and a decision will be announced shortly. 
As special stress is laid on the fact that a 
Canadian company should have preferential 
rights, it is believed that the petition will 
be granted. The Ontario Government 
exacts in all cases that 50 per cent, of the 
power developed must be provided to Cana- 
dian consumers if called for; the balance 
will be exported to the United States. 

While millions of dollars are being 
expended in developing tljese various power 
plants, the revenue will be enormous. Com- 
paratively little labor is required, once the 
energy of Niagara is under control When 
the 350.000 horsepower now in process of 
development is placed on the market, the 
gross income of the power companies will 
be in the neighborhood of 7,000,000 per 
year. This is figuring the price at $20 per 
horsepower a year, which is somewhat 
lower than the present average rate. As 
this provides constant power every day of 
the year, twenty-four hours every day, with 
thorough cleanliness, little fire or accident 
insurance, no expensive equipment for 
generating steam with its heavy annual 
wear and tear, no engineers or firemen — 
simply the turning of a lever — it is seen that 
for many lines of industry, Niagara electric 
power presents remarkable inducements 

The industrial growth of the Niagara 
frontier in the past few years has been mar- 
velous. It is prophesied that within 10 
years 1,000,000 horsepower will be in 
course of development. Up to the present 
time the effect on the volume of water pas- 
Hi 



sing over the falls is not noticeable, even 
with the most careful measurements. A 
short time since, for the purpose of inspec- 
tion, all the water was shut off from power 
development for a number of hours. Com- 
petent men were stationed at different 
points on the river and at the brink of the 
falls to measure the difference in the river 
level when the water producing 100,000 
horsepower was cut off. The men were 
unanimous in their reports that they could 
not detect the slightest variation. A heavy 
wind blowing up or down Lake Erie will 
raise or lower the Niagara River several 
feet, but only those who are well acquainted 
with it will notice any special differerence 
in the discharge at the cataract. The main 
change is in the njiddle channel of the river 
and is principally shown in the rate of dis- 
charge, rather than the raising or lowering 
of the river. 



THE BRANTFORD SCREW CO., 
LIMITED. 

The Brantford Screw Co., Limited, Floyd 
Harris, president, and A. P. Goering, man- 
ager, haye completed the equipment of their 
factory with the most up-to-date machinery 
that the)' could secure for the manufacture 
of stove, sink, carriage and tire bolts, wood 
and machine screws, rivets, rods, nuts, 
special bolts and wire. They are now ask- 
ing the patronage of customers of their 
former company, The Chalcraft Screw Co., 
and of all who may be in the market for 
their lines. 



TWO LARGE LIGHTSHIPS. 

Two lightships building at Toronto by 
the Poison Iron Works for the Dominion 
Government are to be of the following di- 
mensions : Length between perpendiculars, 
from the inside of stem to the inside of 
rudder post, 112 ft.; breadth, molded, 28 
ft. 6 in.; depth of hold from top of keel to 
top of main deck amidships, 14 ft. IOV2 in.; 
load draught, 11 ft. 6 in. There will be in 
each vessel one inverted surface-condensing 
single-cylinder engine with a stroke of 22 
in. and cylinder diameter of 2.'5 in., driving 
one right-handed four-bladed cast-iron 
propeller of the solid type of about 7 ft. Gin. 
diameter. Steam will be furnished by two 
cylindrical straight- tubular boilers de- 
signed for a working pressure of 100 lb. 
per square inch, with a diameter of 9 ft. and 
a length of 1(5 ft. 7>/2 in. 



M ACM IN I l;\ 



ifn t ti .< n ' * a mi \/i tnf 



Will Hold Up a Shelf ! 

That' a what bhId-II bracket Is tor. 
Km tltli piirpOM I ht-rt- ran be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

than [In- .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

ll la wall Japanned, Strong nml Light- 
The aavliiK In might Is a k.m.71 profll, aalde 
from iii*- lower price at which the good! arc told 

H* Order ill reel or th rough your Jobber 

»TLAS MFO. CO., New Haven. Conn., U.S.*. 




Barf 


Fains in New and Rebuilt Machinery 






BO.ILtRS. 


it in 


* 163 In 


i Horizontal 




x 199 in 


.. 




v 131 In 


.. 


SO iii 


v i 14 in 


■Jl I .., 


30 in 


\ 79 in 


i oinisl 


10-ln 




i i.iiiuini-.l 




x M in 


\ :t| in \v mi i Till.. \|.ii in. 


JO in 


x 39 in 


174 i-in Copper T i, Vertical 




x 96 in 


56 '.' in i 


19 in 


\ ll in 


13 'J in So 1 Petri* 


19-ln 


v mm 


'.i 9 in Ho 1 


30-ln 


v 19 in 


19 -'-in Upright 




\ 79 in 




30-ln 


v DO in 


•t i in Submerged Tubulai 
ENGINES. 



\ . i Jewi I Automatic, Nea 

."> -in. i 71 In., H 
1 in \ ; mi N :i 

r in v - In Hi i 

11 -in v In iii. Paerlesfl \ui atlc, Leonard 

in in x 10 in . 

r II P Marine Gasoline Engines 

i ll P Double (ylin.l.r 

Close prices, and full di * ription ol ,ui> piece "i 

iniichim-ry sent mii remit || 

H. W. PETRIE 

I31-3-6-7-9-141-43-4S Kn.ni SI Weil and 

8- 10-1 -.'U 16 1*80-99 Station Si . TOROK PO 



Blacksmiths' 

Hand 

Drills. 

The very 
best. 

B. JARDINE & CO. 
HESPELER, ONT. 





BUY 

KERR 
VALVES. 



They give 

il'tioll 

ever; time, 

Uatali 
on application. 



The Kerr Engine Co. 



Walkervillc.JOnt. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER. 

U I rati i.i .!'■• • Caned Patent I) I 



n 




iJ Nlcklo 
(-, Handle. 



Made bj 

THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, towa, U.S.A TAYLOR-FORBES CO , Limited. Guelph Ool 



"THE PEERLESS" 



Bobtei Spring ever produced A fine 
'In- bard*, i Write Us for Prices 




JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 

M. W. Petrle 1*1-146 Front Street West, TORONTO-Selllng Agent. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS, 

ST. MARYS. ONT., CANADA. 

"Maxwell Favorite Churn" 



Steel Frame Churn. 



LAWN MOWERS. 



Patented Features: Imprcn 
Stand. Roller Hearings, and Fool 
and Hand Lever Drive.and Detach- 
able Driving Link Imp-oved for 
season of 1003. Steel or Wood 
Frame as desired. 




High and Low Wheels, from 12 in to 20-in widths 
Cold Rolled Steel Shafting Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate-. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these "THE MAX WELL" Lawn Mower 
articles HIkIi Wheel ' 1 r 

SEND UIKECT TO VS. 





Wheelbarrows 



. 



MAXWtLL MOWEB 
eel. 



Hard;, n , and Metal 



MACHINERY 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES. 

U T J. O'LHAKY & Co. have registered 
\ \ as manufacturers of electrical ap- 

paratus in Montreal. 

The National Light, Heat vV Power Co., 
Limited. Quebec, have been incorporated. 

|. A. Crowstan, Markdale, Out., has pur- 
I a 10 h. p. horizontal boiler from H. 
\V. l'etrie, Toronto. 

Machinery and electrical appliances are 
being installed in the Ottawa branch of 
John Labatt, Limited. 

A No. 5 Jewel automatic engine was in- 
stalled in the plant of Robertson Bros., 
Toronto, by 11. W. l'etrie. 

A new electric power-house is to be built 
at Tweed, Ont., to take the place of one 
destroyed by fire last week. 

Norman E. Bennett, of Orillia, Ont , has 
installed a 5 h. p. marine engine. This en- 
gine was furnished by H. W. Petrie, Toronto. 

R. Hicks & Co., Peterborough, Ont., 
have purchased a sawing machine from 
Gould, Shapley cc Muir, Brantford, and a 
motor from the Canadian General Electric 
Co., Peterborough and Toronto. 

A boiler with a capacity of 1,300,000 lb. 
of water, and subject to a pressure of 60 lb. 
to the square inch has been supplied by the 
Fleming Foundry, St. John, N.B., to the 
Cushing pulp mill of the same city. 

Walker Bros., Orillia, Ont., have pur- 
chased a 24 x 24 in. x 6V 2 ft. iron planer, 
also a 26 x 42 in. swing x 20 ft. bed gap 
lathe and some smaller lathes and emery 
stands from H. YV. Petrie, Toronto. 

The London Engine Supplies Company, 
manufacturers of engines and machinery 
generally, have been incorporated; capital, 
$40,000, divided into 400 shares of $100 
each; provisional directors, F. G. Mitchell, 
Alfred M. Smart, and John Jones, all of 
London, Ont. 

The Sheppard and Morse Lumber Com- 
pany, of Boston and Ottawa, has closed the 
purchase of the old Mason sawmill, Bays- 
water, N.B., the price paid being $40,000 
or thereabouts. The property is a large 
and well-equipped plant, together with a 
piling ground of considerable area. 

The Hanbury Manufacturing Company, 
of Brandon, may shortly erect a lumber 
mill on the Pacific Coast in British 
Columbia. Machine manufacturers are now 
being communicated with and if the com- 
pany can get the machinery within time, 
they will erect a mill near the mouth of the 
Eraser River. 

The Montreal Transportation Company 
has placed an order for the construction at 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, of a steel 
freight steamer to trade on the lakes and 
take the place of the lost Bannockburn. 
The new steamer will be 248 feet long, 48 
feet beam, with a depth of 23 feet flush 
decks, and is to be ready April 1. The 



engines will be placed aft, ami will be triple 
expansion cylinders, 22, 35 and 58-inch 
diameter, with 39-inch stroke. Two Scotch 
boilers with a working pressure of ISO lb. 
to the square inch will be installed. Mr. J. 
A. Cuttle, manager of the company, is now 
in Great Britain, where he went for the pur- 
pose of arranging for vessels. 

AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVES IN 
ENGLAND. 

Marshal Halstead, United States consul 
at Birmingham, Eng., reviews the criticism 
of American locomotives in England, India 
and Australia. From the criticism he 
argues that a prejudice against German 
and American goods is responsible for what 
he suggests may be a deliberate and unfair 
crusade against them. His conclusion is 
particularly interesting. He says: "The 
crusade against our locomotives continues, 
and our builders disdain to protect them- 
selves by publication. It seems to me that 
a British-made locomotive of the best type 
should be purchased and run as a test on 
some American railroad ; and I hope an 
English engine driver, selected by the manu- 
facturer of the engine, may be given charge 
of it, as a mere matter of fairness." 

TO PREVENT COLLISIONS. 

Experiments have been carried out on a 
railroad near Frankfort with a device to 
prevent collisions, with conspicuous success. 
The invention consists of a small apparatus 
fitted to the locomotive, which gives visible 
and audible signals if another locomotive 
is approaching on the same line of rails, or 
if a switch is misplaced, while in addition 
it also renders telephonic communication 
between locomotives possible. For the 
purpose of the experiments two loco- 
motives were started for the same point on 
the same line of rails. When they were a 
certain distance apart, the apparatus on 
each locomotive gave signals to the 
engineers, who were then able to enter into 
communication. 

INSTALLING ELECTRIC MOTORS. 

A book which should be of much value 
to users of electrical power, has been issued 
by The Scientific Publishing Co., London, 
Eng.; F. J. A. Matthews, A.M. I.E. E., 
editor; under the above title. The book 
contains 157 pages and 84 illustrations, 
and while the field is covered in a compre- 
hensive and practical manner, it is written 
in such language that it will be readily 
understood by the general public as well as 
by electrical engineers. The author first 
deals with the advantages of electric driv- 
ing, and then explains the more common 
electrical definitions and functions in a 
simple manner. In the chapter on typical 
types of English motors will be found 
illustrations and descriptions of a number 
of different makes. The next sections on 
18 



starting switches and other accessories is 
rightly given more space than that on the 
motors themselves; for while there is a 
great family likeness amongst the motors 
themselves, the controlling gear for the 
same is extremely varied in construction 
and action. The book closes with some 
concrete examples of the economies to be 
effected by the use of electric power, and 
remarks on the subject of attention and 
maintenance. 

ELECTRIC POWER FOR VANCOUVER. 

The construction of the Vancouver power 
works is steadily progressing. The waters 
of lakes Coquitlam and Beautiful are being 
joined by a tunnel two miles long, partly 
bored through solid granite. The dam is 
300 ft. long, 50 ft. high, and 35 ft. at the 
base. The intention is to keep the water 
always 20 feet above the outlet pipe from 
the big dam. From the dam down to the 
power house is a drop of 400 feet in 1,600, 
so that no one need to be an expert hydro- 
statist to figure out that the water will not 
come down sluggishly. 

SUPERIOR TO NICKEL. 

Molybdenum has been found superior to 
nickel for hardening and toughening steel. 
It is even better than tungsten for that pur- 
pose. Nickel makes steel tough ; tungsten 
makes it tough and hard; but tungsten 
steel is disposed to crack under impact. 
Molybdenum makes the steel both tough 
and hard and does not make it brittle. It 
has the additional quality of keeping the 
steel cool. It is therefore valuable in the 
manufacture of quick-firing guns. Molyb- 
denum is one of the most refractory of 
metals. Nothing but the electric current 
will reduce it to a liquid state. The greater 
part of the ore supply has hitherto come 
from Sweden; but small quantities have 
been obtained from Maine and Arizona. 
Recently it was discovered in Ontario. A. 
T. Freed, formerly of the office of the Ameri- 
can Iron & Steel Association, and now of 
Hamilton, Ontario, has some molybdenum 
property on the west shore of the Georgian 
Bay, north of Parry Sound. Neither of the 
Canadian properties has been developed. 
At present molybdenum ore, carrying 60 
per cent, of the metal, is worth about $400 
per ton, and the pure molybdenum about 
$2 a pound. — Iron and Machinery World. 

HOW TO UNITE CAST IRON. 

To unite ordinary cast iron is not an 
easy task, but it may be done, if one has 
luck, by boring a dozen holes in the parts 
to be united, then secure well and place 
about the break an abundance of filings of 
good pig iron, some wrought iron tilings 
and also some of steel, says Mining and 
Scientific Press, Lute with fine clay and 
place in lire (before luting use any good 
flux, borax, etc.); heat until the filings 
mell and fill all the cavities. Let remain 
in the lire until fire goes out and the metal 
is cold ; then remove and clean up. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



&&+&&&&&&H?^&i?&&&&&&**&&*&&&4?i?&^&&i?H?+ty+**'W+y* 



* 



A Bicycle Department 



Good 



in your business will pay 

Profits if you sell the 



Cleveland. 

They have the Hygienic Cushion Frame, and this is cushion-frame year. 
The Cleveland Bicycle, "better than ever, always the best," is handled 
with success by many of ihe largest hardware merchants in Canada. 

Write for 1903 prices. 

Canada Cycle and Motor Co., Limited 

Toronto Junction, Canada. 



4 

:- 
4 
4 
4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
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4 

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4 

4 
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>00<>00<>0000000000000<K 



THE AUER 
GAS LAMP 

" Turns night-time into day-time 



^ 



NEW MODELS. 



LOWER PRICES. 



We offer you the best made lamp on the 
market, built scientifically. 

We offer you a lamp that will 
light your store for half the 
cost of kerosene. 

We offer you a lamp that is safer 
than a coal oil one. 

We offer you a lamp which yon 
can sell at a good profit. 

Do you want the Agency for it ? 




No. 25 
100 Candle Povtcr. 



THEN WRITE FOR 



OUR CATALOGUE AND DISCOUNTS. 

EVERY LAMP GUARANTEED. 



AUER LIGHT CO., 1682 NOTRE DAME ST., MONTREAL. 




A Silent Salesman that Talks Goods 

YOURS FREE 

The 

"NEW GEM" 

Safety 

Razor. 



four order 
for "iir following 
and 
this Rllenl 

ours. 
We haw mmle 

frnm OUT know]- 
■ tin- gpodi 

bv your trade. 
have t )i e 

kl nnv 

tunc of sending 

back foi 

»">' "Kern '...., 

;it iin- not 
found read] 



tin 

in 

| 




1 a | 

nit'iut- in r ii 

ill in all a fixture thai »nj mi will be proud to pi 

where 1 1 



Who i ■ Retail 

Hem" EUxoif $6.00 112.00 

l Btrop Machine 1.60 

i 

i Case N 



N I 



$20.05 IM.2S 



For sale hv lullriy ./.ihhrr.t all orer Ihe trurl,/ 

GEM ClILtm CO., 31 Rcadc St., New >ork. 




Hun!;, at,- ,in,i Metal 



THE ART OF WINDOW DRESSING. 



Sonne Hints and Suggestions. 



DON'T think you can dress your win- 
dows SO as to catch trade without 
Grst Milium down quietly whore 
you "ill suffer no interruptions, and ask- 
>urseli the question: " What particu- 
lar article is it 1 wish to sell at this par- 
ticular time and what particular design 
of window dressing must 1 use in which 
particular window that will 

ATTRACT THE PARTICULAR CUSTOMER 

to whom 1 wish to sell this article?" 

There is the whole scheme of window 
dressing in a nutshell— particularizing. 

The mosl noticeable fault in the store 
windows is the lack of that specializing 
that catch.-- the eye and by holding it 
turn- the thoughts in the direction of one 
article so that the spectator can have it 
out with himself whether he could find 
any use for that article. 

\ POIN1 TO BE REMEMBERED. 

There is a point to lie remembered— an 
attractive specilaizing of an article for 
sale often brings about the result that 
the one who sees it thinks, "Have I any 
use for that ? " whereas a mixed display 
where it attracts attention is viewed with 
the thought, " Have I any need for 
that ? " 

In the observation of the difference of 
those two thoughts lies the great success 
of many merchants of to day. 

Jn this day of demand for luxuries as 
well as necessities you must not cater 
onlv to what your customers might need, 
but to what they might use if they had 
it. 

EXHIBIT AN ARTICLE 

as if you would say: " Now, look here. 
Here's a beautiful or useful thing. -lust 
think of the pleasure that could be de- 
rived from this, or the labor and time 
tl„. possession of this would save you.'' 

Don't appear to be saying merely, "Do 
you really need this article? Is it an ab- 
solute necessity to your daily existence?" 

If you display what you have to sell in 
tin- proper way, the mind of the one who 
it is an 

INTERESTING PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY. 

lb- is walking along the street, think- 
in-. | erhaps, of the good crop of wheat 
that held back of the barn raised last 
year, or the price of consols, or the last 
railway disaster, when suddenly his eye 
turns to a window, and he stops almost 
before he realizes it or knows the reason. 

Then the study commences. His 
rHOUGHTS KIN 

omethiug like this : " Say there's a 

^trikin- window. That article shows up 



pretty well, doesn't it ? Quite a nice 
thing itself, too. Thai would be a great 
thing for some people. Say, it would 
save me lots of time and worry. I really 
believe I need such a thing as that. Yes, 
that is just what 1 do need. I'll get it." 

Perhaps he thinks. " Ahem, quite a 

store A — ■ keeps. Good window that. 

That's a lovely thing there. Too bad 
Mary hasn't one of those. Wonder what 
it costs. Two dollars and a half! Ahem ! 
That would be handy for her. 1 believe 
-he'd want that. Come to think of it, 
don't see how she has done without it 
before. I'll get it." 

You sec we have become so accustomed 
in the past to buy only what we need 
that even yet with all the prosperity of 
the past few years we have to convince 
ourselves in most cases that we are actu- 
ally in need of a thing before we buy it. 

However, we are gradually 

APPROACHING THE REALIZATION 

of the fact that with ready money, com- 
fort and even luxury provide a more 
pleasant ami grateful (if I may use the 
word i opening for the spending of that 
money thark.the necessities of life. 

It is a well-known fact that the lux- 
uries we buy <>r receive are appreciated 
and recognized to a far greater extent 
than the supply of our needs. 

We have reached that position in the 
consideration of beauty and comfort that 
upon seeing an article well displayed we 
comment first on its beauty or usefulness, 
although, as I have said, we yet try to 
observe our need of it. 

If the goods for sale are purely a lux- 
ury you can easily see that your 

SUCCESS in mi-: HANDLING 
of those goods depends entirely on your 
exhibition of it. 

The majority of merchants reteognize 
this fact and exercise some care in dis- 
playing such an article, but where the 
object for sale is not entirely a luxury, 
too many of you imagine that it has 
only to be shown in a desultory fashion. 
Then you wonder why it doesn't sell and 
afterwards steer clear of buying it again. 

Observe this fact, that no matter what 
you have for sale, and no matter what 
window you are decorating, there should 
be one or two articli 3pecilaized in the 
scheme of decoration. 

SEASONABLE GOODS. 

You have always- some articles that you 
wish t,, | ush or that are seasonable. 

20 



Therefore, you should have no difficulty 

in arranging a good window. 

If the article is large the easier it is 
io give it prominence, bu1 a small article 
can also In- made prominent by leaving 
empty spaces around it or by having 
smaller goods radiate from it. 

That scheme of making a ware con- 
spicuous is the 

EASIES1 AND MOM EFFECTIVE. 

No matter what size the article for 
sale it can be placed in the centre of the 
window, or even in any position. Objects 
are then placed in lines running towards 
the special ware you wish to push. The 
eye naturally follows those lines and as 
they all end at the particular article, it 
at last rests there and you have attained 
your object. 

Strange as it may appear, this special- 
izing, although focussing- the eye in one 
spot, does not detract from the adver- 
tisement of the other goods in the win- 
dow. 

In the first place, they profit from the 
extra attention given to the window on 
account of such specializing, and the eye 
when drawn to a particular point natur- 
ally follows it up by roaming over the 
remainder of the display. Oftentimes, if 
the person viewing the window is observ - 
vant, he will seek to discover the plan 
adopted to 

ATTRACT HIS ATTENTION 

to a point, and in doing so, of course, 
the other articles come under his con- 
sideration. 

You never, however, decorate for the 
benefit of everything equally, so do not 
consider it a disadvantage even if, in the 
general scheme, prominence cannot be 
given to each article. They will .have 
their turn sometime. 

Jf you have been wondering why your 
window 

LACKED TONE, 

originality, influence, try specializing. Sit 

down, decide what you wish to push at 
this particular season, work out some 
plan for drawing- attention to this article, 
then get to work and carry out that 
plan. 

If the results do not surprise it is be- 
cause you have selected some unseason- 
able article or the plan adopted for show- 
ing it is veiv defective. Don't stint you r- 
self for til ic for considering article and 
plan, and the results will be apparent 
immediately. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MKTAL 



T 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

mm h wii s' rooi s. 
f^HE calendar of The Mechanics Sup- 
plj Co., 96 Petei street, Quebec, U 
printed in English and French, t^n 
each of the l:! sheets, above the months, 
■re photo-engravings of their various 
manufactures, which, being printed on 
much finer paper than is usually put into 
calendars, show up verj well. The cal- 
endai is printed in red and bla< l< through- 
out, and all holidays are recorded. A 
glance al ii will ^iw- some idea of the 
wide range of goods which the companj 
handle. The^ have also an illustrated 
catalogue, which dealers will find useful. 
1 1 i-> senl on application. 

HARDWARE AND PLUMBING. 

The 1 903 calendar of Amiot, Lecours & 
Lariviere, hardware dealers and plumbers, 
St. Lawrence si reet, Montreal, has recently 
come lo hand. Ii is a large one and will 
designed. Besides the advertisements, 
there are engravings showing the offices 
and sample rooms, and also the goods 
entrance •.wd of the building. The sheets 
are printed in different colors. The cal- 
endar is in French. 

i INADA FOUNDRY CO. 

The Canada Foundrj Co., Limited, are 
issuing a tastj calendar, the prevailing 
tint of which is blue. Pillars running up 
besido the dale sheet support a picture of 
two brawny-armed workmen In the 
background is the foundry and in white 
type, through the smoke from the high 

chimney, stands out prominently "Canada 
Foundrj Co., Limited." A bright, green 

maple leaf, in the centre of which appears 

the company's monogram, adds materially 
to the appearance. The entire outline 
work of the calendar is made up of pro- 
duets of the foundry, and yel heavy and 
large as these products are. the result is 
not at all rough. 

GREENING WIRE CO.'S CALENDAR. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited, 
Hamilton, are issuing this year a calendar 
similar in general outline to that sent out 
a year ago. An excellent feature of this 
year's publication is a series of tables of 
much value to dealers in, or users of, wire, 
sheet zinc, wrought iron and steel, bar 
iron, etc. The tables show the size, 
weight, length and strength of wire and 
wire rope, a table of transmission of power 

In wire ropes, Weigh) and si/e of sheet 

rinc, weight of rolled sheets of wrought 

iron and steel, the weight of iron per foot. 
These tables are so arranged that they can 



readil) he seen In lifting up the pages con- 
taining the calendai dates, which are ol i 

lai ge pi .11 Ii, . 1 1 size. 

I \N I OR-FURBKS CO., I I \n I I i>. i J I I I'll. 

["he raylor-Forbes Co's. trnde-calendai 
i>'i the season of 1903 is an exceedingly 
line one. The covet is printed in three col- 
ors. V young lad) with one of theii mowers, 

stands out well in the foreground, and a 
villa is in the background. ^In the 
ul page is a ilear nil of the Cos 

plant, which plant covers 290,000 ^i'mi. 
feet of floor space. The i uis of iluii dif- 
ferent styles of mowers are also creditable. 
The Taylor-Forbes Co., Limited, have a 
large trade with the Old Country, where 

their machines have a high reputation, as 
well as in I he home market. 



POETICAL HARDWARE DEALERS. 

OFTEN the annual advertisement is 
the most effectual. The keen busi- 
ness man is, therefore, ever alert 
tor a medium likely to prove of especial 
value. James & Keid, hardware dealers, 
Perth, evident!] recognize a good oppor- 
tunity tor advertising, as this year, when 
a local paper was preparing its annual 
" (.airier Uovs' Vddress,"a poetic produc- 
tion, they secured the back page, ou which 

the following verses were printed : 

Messrs. George S. James and Daly Reid 

Are known well all around, 
As the proprietors of the Big Hardware Ho 

Where little prices abound. 

Their staff of clerks are courteous, polite, 

Strict attention to orders is paid. 
For served by Montgomery, Bolton and Haw 

No customer is delayed. 

Mr Lawrence H. James is the practical man. 

Who spares not an effort to please, 
And his genius is such, that where others would 
fail. 

He succeeds with the greatest of ease. 

O'er the books in the office Miss Leonard presides. 

And she fills this position of trust 
To the firm's satisfaction, and customers' too. 

She's so competent, careful and just. 

The stock the firm carries is varied and large. 

And perhaps something special you need. 
Ten chances to one you can buy what you want 

From the big hardware firm, James & Reid. 

'I hey handle nice harness and good curry combs. 

Also blanket, belt, halter and bell. 
Forks, shovels and spades, scythes, cradl 
saws. 

So the farmer can be suited here well. 

The builder can buy all he requn 

In nails, glass, locks, paint, or in tools. 
The miner, his dynamite, steel or his chains 
For with James & Reid quality rules. 

The most wonderful pump is the one with glass 
valves. 

The pump children can handle with ease, 
It's so easy to work and throws such a stream 

Ami it has never been known to free 

But time and space fail us to tell of the stock. 

But lames & Reid would like this to say 
That they thank you for patronage given to them 

And hope for your custom alway. 

L'l 



VARNISH 



"0 Ruddier than 

the Cherry." 

Wo od Stains are an im 
portanl branch of our Imsincss. 

Tin' Canada Paint Com- 
pany manufacture ( Jherry . 
Rosewood, Mahoganj . Wal 
nut. Oak. Golden Oak ami 
Green Amboine Stain for 
houses and furniture. They 
are incomparably the very besl 
permanent stains made. A 
stained floor is sweel ami 
wholesome. 

We make it specialty ol 
Creosote Shingle Stains. 
By I heir use the root' will be 

preserved ami have a band 
some appearance for a verj 

long period. 

Write t'nr a set of samples. 
They will be sent free t<> any 
hardware merchant or arehi 
tect. Address 

The CANADA 
PAINT COMPANY, 

Montreal or Toronto 



it 



cA 



&*■ 



JAPANS 



H.inln .!-•• .in. I Metal 




DEVELOPING THE PAINT TRADE. 

i >nMi: months ago one of t lit* leading 
^^ hardware journals of the United 
States published a series of articles, 
extracts from letters from manufacturers 
unci merchants in different sections of the 
States, in regard to the evident tendency 
on the part of the hardware trade to 
handle paints and oils. The letters in- 
dicated that the paint business of that 
country was formerly in the hands of the 
druggists, but, that, while a considerable 
proportion of the business is still handled 
by them, a steadily increasing share of it 
is now secured by the hardware trade. 

In Canada, hardwaremen are recognized 
as the natural distributors of paints and 
oils, and, while in isolated cases general 
merchants, druggists, and even stationers 
handle them, the bulk of the business is 
done by the hardware trade. 

Inasmuch as builders' hardware, tools, 
etc., arc sold by hardware dealers, the 
latter find the sale of paints, oils and 
varnishes, particularly for building pur- 
poses, natural and easy. It is, more- 
over a profitable line to the dealer who 
gives time and thought to its develop- 
ment. One instance will suffice to estab- 
lish this point. The following is an ex- 
tract from a letter written by a dealer 
who handles the produce of one of the 
most progressive paint houses : " We can- 
not speak too highly of your goods, and 
take pleasure at all times in recommend- 
ing and pushing them. In fact, we have 
thought of dropping out of general hard- 
ware and giving our entire time to push- 
ing this line, but the smallness of the 
town, 8,000 population, makes us hesi- 
tate and we would be glad to have your 
opinion in the matter. Each succeeding 
year brings us larger trade in paints, and 
there is no line we handle that gives us 
the same pleasure in selling, and we con- 
sider it a \alualile addition to our gen 
eral business." 

How best to develop the paint trade is 
a subject worthy of the hardwareman's 
best study, for the line is one that yields 
excellent returns for the time and thought 
-pent in extending it. We would like to 
receive from hardware dealers throughout 
the country, who have made their paint- 
trade a particularly profitable line, their 
opinion as to how the trade should be 
developed, which we would be glad to 
publish. We do not want to know how 
any dealer got business that would other- 
have gone to a competitor, but how 
be developed entirely new business, which, 



in the long run, would help a competitor 
as well as the one who originated it. 

PAINTMEN V SCOTCHMEN. 

The paint men of Montreal had a curl- 
ing match on Monday night with a team 
jiicked from the Scottish curlers, who are 
touring Canada. The Montrealers, al- 
though badly beaten, enjoyed the sport 
and clain if they had another opportun- 
ity they would do better. Mr. A. Ram- 
say was skip for the Montrealers and 
Mr. Prain for the Scotchmen. 

ROBERT MUNRO RESIGNS. 

At a meeting of the paint, oil and var 
nish men of Montreal on Monday a letter 
was read from Robt. Munro, stating his 
intention to resign as the representative 
on the Board of Trade Council, of which 
he has been an energetic member for 
three years. He was urged to keep his 
seat, but declined, owing to the pressure 
of other business. He was tendered a 
vote of thanks. Mr. John T. Wilson, of 
Wilson & Patterson, was nominated to 
occupy the seat vacated by Mr. Munro, 
and will, in all probability, be elected. 

A BEAUTIFUL CALENDAR. 

It would be hard to choose a more 
artistic painting for use in a calendar 
than that which The Wadsworth - How 
land Company, paint and color makers, 
Chicago, are sending out to the trad.:. 
The feature of the calendar is an almost 
full-sized painting of a "Society Butter- 
fly " in full array, presented in life-like 
colors, drawn by a first-class artist. It 
is safe to say that any of the trade for- 
tunate enough to secure one will give it 
a place of honor either in their home or 
office. Do not write for one without 
mentioning "Hardware and Metal." 

THE RALEIGH OIL DISCOVERIES. 

A despatch from Chatham, Ont., clears 
up much of the confusion that has settled 
in tin ■ public mind for some time regard- 
ing the quantity of oil produced in the 
new Raleigh township oil fields. It seems 
that the production has been materially 
exaggerated. In one case a well which 
yielded 60 barrels the first hour now 
yields bul 60 barrels per day, yet this 
well is still spoken of as yielding about 
fit) barrels per hour. There are a number 
of other wells in the district that are re- 
ported to be producing laroe quantities 



of oil. being credited with a yield vary- 
ing from Hi to .'in barrels per day, based 
upon the production of the first hour , 
but which have a steady How ,,f one an I 
a half, two, or perhaps four barrels per 
day only. Some of the wells which made 
a fairly good showing at first do not now 
produce enough oil to make it worth 
while operating them, and with the usual 
luck experienced by miners and drillers, 
other wells have proven themselves to be 
dry propositions. The general experience 
of this district shows that quite a large 
flow of gas is met with at about 330 ft., 
and directly beneath this is the oil stra 
turn, with large quantities of salt water, 
the oil constituting probably in the 
neighborhood of 1" per cent, of the liquid 
pumped. 

PAINT AND OIL NOTES. 

The Federal Oil Company, of Montreal, 
are seeking incorporation. 

The assets of The John McArthur Com- 
pany, paint dealers, etc., Montreal, are 
to be sold on Monday. 

A despatch from Chatham, Ont., says 
that discoveries of oils are still being 
made there, several new wells producing 
from 10 to 30 barrels per day. The oil 
is of high quality, its gravity being 34 
degrees, which is two degrees higher than 
most Canadian oils. It will, therefore, 
make illuminating oil that cannot be ex- 
celled. 

WITH THE FRANCIS-FROST CO., 
LIMITED. 

James W. Lee, formerly with The Cau- 
ada Paint Company, has accepted a situ- 
ation with The Francis-Frost Company, 
Limited, Toronto, which company he will 
represent in Toronto and Northern Ont- 
ario. Mr. Lee is widely known as one of 
the most genial travellers on the road. 

PAINT AND OIL MARKETS. 

MONTREAL. 

BUSINESS during the past week had 
shown a greatly increased activity, 
and the indications are that the 
volume of spring trade will be large. The 
bulk of the business being booked at pres- 
ent is for spring delivery, and the sort- 
ing-up orders are for fair amounts. Paris 
green is still in fair demand by jobbers 
and prices remain as hitherto quoted. 
Linseed oil on the English market is still 
too erratic to induce business, and local 
prices remain steady, The turpentine 



PAINT, oil. AND BRUSH TRADES 



llarttu are umi Metal 




That's the Paint I Want. 



■%&v Dealers who have handled "Ark lirand" for years tell us that 
*\ ^.practically sells itself. 

\4?he customer comes in to the store and point! to I display 
& of "XfkJJrand" and says that's the paint 1 want. 

*K_He has used it before. 

It satisfies him; he knows it is economical. 

Isn't it well to have your paint customers satisfied ? 

Then sell them "Ark Brand." 

Carry a line in stock so that you can serve customers with a 
paint about which you can tell the truth. 

You can speak as highly as you like about "Ark Brand" Paint 
and the man who buys it will never prove you wrong. "Ark 
Brand" Paint is right. 




f. 



Francis -Frost C? 






Canadian Distributing j\ gents 
for Grippin's CracK filler. 



Toronto. 



I 



Why has . . . 



ollywood Paint 



leapt into favor ? 



Because 



Pure Lead, Zinc and Linseed 
Oil combined with the best 

Canadian Brains 



enter into its composition. 

"Painters like it." 

If you are interested write 



The Hollywood Paint Co. 



HAMILTON. CAN. 



McArthur. Corneille & Co 



lu 



MONTREAL 

and Gelatine 



<n extensive assortment, to suit ell requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



~^v 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Impei ial French Green 

of JOHN LDCAS & CO.. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardwakk ami Mt.TAL when writing. 



Haitian) t- and Metal 



PAINT, oil. AND BRUSH TRADES 



market is -till advancing and the pi>« - t's 

have been marked up 2c tin- week, ft'e 

quote 

GROl M> WHITE LEAD. Best brands, 

i urn. nt standard, $4 90 to 15. L5 . 

No. 1, 14.1 - 1 TTA , No. 2, 14.30 to 

14.024 ; No. 4, 

s:{ ,-,,-, 5 all f.o.b., Montreal. Terms. 

l months, oi 3 per cent. otT for easb in 

30 days 

1)K\ WHITE LEAD.— |S in casks, ami 
in kegs, 15.26. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— Pure dry, in 
casks. 6Jc.; in 100-tb. kegs, 6£c. No. i 
zinc, in casks, 5±c; in 100-tb. kegs, 5Jc. 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25- lb. irons, 8c.; No. 1, 7c; No.2, 6c. 

PUTTY.—' We quote : Bulk, in bbls.. 
SI. 90 per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 
82.05 : bladders, in bbls., $2.25 ; bind 
ders, in 100 or 200-lb. kegs or boxes, 
|3 40 : in tins, $2.55 to S2.G5 ; in less 
than 100-tb. lots, S3 f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa. Toronto, Hamilton. London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. higher, 
f.o.b. St. John and Halifax. 

ORANGE MINERAL.— Casks, 7c; 100 
rt). kegs, 7ic; smaller quantities. 8Jc. 

RED LEAD.— Genuine red lead, in casks. 
S4 50 ; in 100-lb. kegs, 84.75 ; in less 
quantities, S5.75 per 100 lb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks. SI 25 ; kegs, S4.50, and 
smaller quantities, S5.50. 

LITHARGE.— Ground, casks, 5c. ; less 
quantities, 5£c; flake litharge, casks, 
85.25; smalls, 15.75 per LOO lb. 

LINSEED OIL.- Raw, 1 to 1 barrels, 
90c.; boiled. 63c; raw, 5 to 9 barrels, 
59c; boiled, 62c. Terms, net cash in 30 
days. Delivered in Ontario. between 
Montreal and Oshawa, at 2c. per gallon 
advance. 

TI RPENTINE.— Single barrels, 82c; 2 
to 1 barrels, 81c. Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 

SHELLAC VARNISH.— Pure white, 
12.35 to 12.45; orange. 82.25 to $2.35. 

MIXED PAINTS.— $1.20 to $1.40 per 
gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— 8| to 9£c in wholesale 
lots, and !•• - additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL. I- to 50c. 

COD OIL.— 35 to 37* ■■ 

PARIS <,l;i:i;N. Canadian : Petroleum 
barrels, 13Jc. per lb.; arsenic kegs, 13'c; 
50 and lOO-lb. drums, L4c; 25-K). drums, 
14£c; lib. pacl 15c; i-lb. packages, 

17c; I lb. tins, L6c; 1 tb. tins, 18c Eng 
lish : Petroleum barrels, I LJc. ; arsenic 
kegs, 1 4A< : 50 to 100 Itj. drums, 15c; 25 
lb. drums, 154c; 1-lb. papei boxes, L6c . 
i-flj. tins, 17c 

rORONTO. 

Turpentine has again advanced, the 

price now kx Ln \ 32c. delivered and 

,, ; inside points. Linseed oil is 1c. per 

gallon lower. Gum shellac is quoted 2c. 

higher by some I -■ Other Lines are 

i, al ,,,, |, . though an advance in white 



lead is possible, either on aooount oi »c 

ase in tile dutj on lead products oi 

because of the reformation of the White 
Lead \ i iation. In anj .ase, the job- 
bers state that prices are not being cul 

Up as much as formerly. We quote: 

WHITE LEAD.— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
iead, $5 to $5.25 ; No. 1, 81. 02 J to 
: No. -', $4.25 to §4.50 ; No. 3, 
$3.87J to $4.12$.; No. 4, 83.50 to $3.75 
in packages of 25-lb. and upwards ; ^c. 
per lb. extru will be charged for 1241b. 
pkgs.; genuine drv white lead in casks, 
55.02*. 

RED LEAD. Genuine, in casks of 560 
tb . $4.50 ; ditto, in kegs of LOO lb., $5 ; 
No. |, in casks of 560 Lb., $3.75; ditto, 
in kegs of LOO Lb., $4.25. 

LITHARGE.— Genuine, (S to OJc. 

WHITE ZINC— Genuine, French V.M., 
in casks, 86.25; Lehigh, in casks, 86 to 
S0.25. 

SHINGLE STAIN.— In 5-gallon lots. 
1)0 to 75c. per gallon. 

PARIS WHITE.— 90c. to $1 per 100 tb. 

WHITING.— 65c. per 100 lb.; Gilders" 
whiting, 80c 

gum shellac—Li cases, 35 to 37.;.; 

in less than eases, 111 to 42c. per tb. 

LIQUID SHELLAC— Pure orange, in 
bbls., 82.25 to 82.35 ; white, 82.35 to 
82.45 per gal. ; in less quantities, 10c. 
extra. 

GLUES.— Broken sheet, in 200-tb. bbls., 
8^c. per tb.; cabinet glue, in bbls., 12c; 
emery l:1uc, in bbls., 17£c; bookbinders', 
ground, 10^c; finest American, white, 
19c; No. 1 American white, 15c per tb. 

PUTTY.— Bladders, in barrels, $2.25; 
bladders, in 100-tb. kegs, 82.40 ; bulk in 
bbls., 81.00 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up 
to 100 tb., 82.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, 
less than 100 tb., 82.90. 

PARIS GREEN.— Petroleum bbls., 14c 
per tb.; arsenic kegs, 14£c; 50 and 100 
Lb. drums, 15c; 25-tb. drums. 15^c; 1-lb. 
packages, 16c; *-lb. packages, 18c; 1-lb. 
tins, 16c; $-tb. 18c. 

PLASTER PARIS— New Brunswick, 
$2 per barrel. 

PUMICE STONE— Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls. and 4 to 5c. per tb. in less 



quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots and 
8c in bbls. 

LIQUID PAINTS.— Pure, $1.20 to Sl.lu 
per gallon ; No. I, $1 10 per gallon. 

BARN PAINTS.— 65 to 70c per gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— English, in cases, 9 
to 9$c per lb. and 10 to 10^c for single 
tins. 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, I to 2 bbls., 61c; 

boiled, 64c; 3 to 5 barrels, raw. title. : 
boiled, <)oe ; 6 in II barrels, raw, 58c ; 
boiled. 61c, delivered. To Toronto, Ham 
ilton and London, 2c less. All quanti 
ties of 10 bbls. and over of linseed oil 
sold only f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don and Guelph. 

TURPENTINE Single bbls., 82c; 2 to 
3 bbls., 81c. delivered. Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London, Ic. less. For less quanti 
ties than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 gallon packages, 
."'». and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GASOLINE AND BENZINE.— We quote 
as follows: Benzine, L9£c. and gasoline. 
ordinary, 21£c. and engine, 22£c. f.o.b. 
Toronto. 

WINDOW GLASS. 

MONTREAL. 

There is practically no business in win 
dnw glass, and the prospects for an im- 
provement in the near future are poor. 
Prices are very linn, however. We quote, as 
follows : First break, 50 ft., $2; second, 
82.10 for 50 ft. ; first break, 100 feet, 
83.80 ; second break, 4 ; third break, 
84.50 ; fourth break, 84.75. 



Prices are unchanged, but there is some 
talk of the formation of another win- 
dow glass association, which information 
is having a salutary effect on trade. We 
quote as follows: Under 26-in., $4.25 ; 26 
to 40 in., $4.65; 41 to 50 in., $5.10; 51 
to 60 in., $5.35; 61 to 70 in., 85.75; 71 
to 80 in., $6.25 ; 81 to 85 in., $7 ; 86 to 
90 in., $7.75. Toronto, Hamilton and 
London. Terms, four months, or 3 per 
cent., 30 flays. Discount, 15 per cent. 



It gives satisfaction, 
It pleases the customer, 
It sells quickly, 
It's a money-maker, 
Its advertising is up-to-date, 
It's the only paint that 
contains 




"ANCHOR" 
LIQUID 
PAINT 



Your sales will increase if 
you handle "ANCHOR" LIQUID 
PAINT. 



GENUINE. 
The World's Standard. 



Send us a post card and 
let us tell you all about 
It. 




HENDERSON & POTTS 

Established 1874 

HALIFAX and MONTREAL 




PAINT. OIL Wl» UMSii TRADES 



//hi J., art ami Mriul 



WILLIAM ABBOTT 

Representing Jonas & I olver'i ' elebrated Novo 
Air Hardening Steel. Especially adapted foi 
■peed and foi all clauei ol toola and work 
annealed, foi shaping Into Milling Cutters, Dies 
and other tools Stock on band (or Immediate 
oiden 

Oiflce and Sample Koom. IJ St. John Street, 

MONTREAL. 



GLUE 



1 be sticking 

kind I he 
only i-. 111. mill. U 

lured 1 >\ us 



\\'i iir for ipiotatons. 



W.Harris &Co. 



Danforth Ave 

J TORONTO 



PAINTS 



Wr manuflusinre 
Lbeae brands 
l [ON," " PEERLESS," "OWL," 

•■ havkn." also Krii.i.v mixed 
II n ii s e anil Floor 
PainlS, Hunt. Itiirn. 

B rldg •• and Brick 
Palnts.Coacb t bloia, 
\ aralanea, Japans, 
etc ' »ur prloes ww 
Interest you. Write 
us. 
The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont. 




«48>eJS*ftsVe> 



TRADi; 




MARK 



Wobles % Hoare 

CORNWALL ROAD 8TAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers ot 

HIGH CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can he obtained direct from the work* 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 




GLASS 



For buildings and 
allothrr purposes 



Our Specialty Art Leaded Glass. 

Ssu Our Naw Catalogue. 

Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 

LONDON, ONI. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R HEINISCH'S SONS CO. l&jSgRSRgbr Ckmtm * * 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



. 1 <r-r-"r~ 




The Sort That Sells 



OPERATING: 

Boockh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 

MONTREAL BRANCH : I end 3 DsBrssoles St 



A poor article is no bargain at any price. -Doubtless the expert Painter 
realizes this trueism about as much as anybody in the world : with him a 
poor, out-of-date Brush, upon which he has to spend time in winding by 
old-fashioned methods, means loss of money and inferior work to his 
detriment. 

BOECKH'S FLEXIBLE BRIDLED 
PAINT BRUSHES 

are the kind that are stocked by progressive Dealers, because they arc 
demanded now by all progressive Painters. 

— The bridle can easily be removed and replaced ; it is not affected by 
— water, oil or paint ; it works on a pivot and keeps the bristles elastic. 

UNITED FACTORIES, 



Head Office : TORONTO. LIMITED. 

LONDON BRANCH: 71 Dundis St 



//ui./.i „•, ,111,1 Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



AND ALLIED TRADES 



THE PROSPERITY OF EDMONTON. 

n T i ;. JONES, treasurer <>f The J. 
\ \ K. Pease Furnace Co., Limited, 

Toronto, is in Edmonton, V\\. 
'J'., this week, superintending the installa 
tiou of a heating plant in a large pub- 
lic building there. Mr. Jim,- seems to 
have caught the fire oi enthusiasm over 
the Northwest, which is manifested by 
so many business men who \ isit that 
part oi Canada. He writes as follows: 
The Western country is very prosperous 
and promising. In Winni, eg business pi o 
spects are very bright indeed, and in 
■ v.i\ town we have passed through since 
reaching Fort William, then- is every evi- 
dence of rapid and substantial pro- 
la Alberta the progress made within the 
last year has been amazing-. It is as- 
lonishing that such a splendid country 
could have been so long unknown and 
ted. The Bank of Commerce open 
ed a line office in Edmonton in October. 
Merchants, Onion, and Imperial were 
already here. Now tho Bank of Mont- 
real has within the last week paid §300 
pel ft. for a 5 If t. lot on which to erect 
u building for a new branch in the spring. 
It is backed up by an enormous trade 
centering here ; by a magnificent farming 
and ranching country, and by a great 
trade in furs that reaches out to the Arc- 
tic Ocean. 2,000 miles north . The amount 
of merchandise handled here, the number oi 
settlers coming m, the rapidity with 
which all the lands in Alberta aie being 
taken up would astonish most people who 
ha\e never been here." 

THE McCLARY FIRE AT LONDON. 

London, Out., January 12, 1903.— On 
visiting the scene of Friday's conflagra- 
tion, one can -*••■ a strong gang of men 
working like beavers cleaning up all the 
burned debris and making active pre 
parations for resuming business and ie 
building. 

Our, London, Out., representative called 
on the firm to-day and was authorized to 
insert in " Hardware and Metal," the fol- 
lowing informal ion : 

•• The accounts of the fire given by the 
daily press were greatly exaggerated. No 
damage was done to our heavy machin- 
ery; the greater part of thi> was on the 
ground floor, while the fire was mostly 
confined to the second and third floors, 
where some light machinery was in oper- 
ation, and the balance of space wa 
for bench work. The fourth floor was 
ii-.-d a-> a wan-room, in which a small 



quantity i<i made-up stock was destroyed. 
Nut our large warehouses, japanning shop, 
spinning room, enamel shop, and foun- 
dry remain untouched. Our branch ware- 
houses at St. John, N.I?., Toronto, Mont- 
real, Winnipeg, and Vancouver are all 
well ailed with tin and enamel stock ; 
with but slight exception, all our regular 
orders can be filled. 

" Our heavy Stamping machinery, which 
is in the damaged section, will recom- 
mence operations in a few days, and with 
in two weeks our output will be as heavy 
as before the fire. Our tinsmiths all 
commenced work again this morning, and 
only a few girls will lose a few days' 
time. 

" The tools destroyed were immediarely 
re ordered, and many have already come 
to hand. 

' The large store warehouse, which, ow- 
ing to the very heavy demand for stores 
last year, was cleaned right out, will be 
utilized temporarily for the bench work 
formerly done in the building destroyed. 

" Our customers will not suffer from in- 
convenience, as all the orders can soon be 
promptly filled as before, and we hope 
the cordial business relations will con- 
tinue uninterrupted." 

Insurance is carried by a number of 
companies. No correct estimate of the 
loss sustained can yet be arrived at, but 
the insurance men are busy on this mat- 
ter now. 

W. H. L. 

CAN TRUST PRICES. 

It is stated on seemingly good author- 
ity that The American Can Company has 
just announced prices for the coming 
season on the basis of $15.50 per 1,000 
for No. 2 cans at Baltimore, and others 
at the usual differentials. The prices arc 
about the same as last season, while the 
plate is 40c. a box lower in the open 
market. On the face of it, this would 
indicate considerably increased profits 
during the present year for the Trust, fn 
line with this the general prospects of 
the company arc said to be better than 
they have e\ er been, but this is not say - 
ing a great deal, as the combine on 
March 19 next will have been in existence 
two years, with II per cent, cumulative 
dividends still against the preferred 
stock. — N. Y. Journal of Commerce. 



THE WESTERN FOUNDRY CO. 

The Western Foundry Co., Limited, of 
Wingham, Out., are hard at work on an 
extensive line of patterns which they 
state will embrace all lines that the Can 
adian trade demands and which, when 
completed, will be of the most modern 
and up-to-date design on the Canadian 
market. It would be well to examine the 
lines made by this company, which are 
rapidly winning an excellent reputation 
for the quality, finish and appearance of 
their product. 

STOVE MAKERS MEET. 

A meeting of the Stove Manufacturers' 
Association was held yesterday in the 
Koyal Hotel. There were present Col. 
Gartshore, of The McClary Manufactur- 
ing Company, representing the Oalorica 
Club, of Upper Canada ; Charles Fawcett, 
of Sackville ; Mr. Cosman, of The Am- 
herst Furnace and Heating Company : 
James Hillis, of James Hillis & Son, of 
Halifax, and W. S. Fisher, of St. John. 
The principal topic of discussion was 
the affiliation of the Association with the 
Calorica Club, a similar organization in 
Upper Canada.— St. John Sun, January 
9. 

AMONG THE TRADE. 

Power & Co., roofers, etc., Sydney, N. 
S., have been succeeded by Power ii 
Cassett. 

.Samuel Wake, engineer at The William 
Kennedy & Sons' Co. foundry, Owen 
Sound, Ont., died last week after a brief 
illness. 

Alfred Peters, manager of The Record 
Foundry and Machine Co., Moncton, N. 
B., was struck in the face on Saturday 
by a piece of iron that was being broken. 
His injury is a painful one. 

John Illsey, tin and stove merchant, of 
Picton, Ont., died at his home on New 
Year's Day, after a brief illness. Mr. Ill 
sey, besides being a respected business 
man, was one of the most earnest tern 
perance and religious workers in Picton 

NINE-HOUR DAY IN VANCOUVER. 

Tho iron moulders of Vancouver, B.C., 
and their employers have agreed to a 
nine hour day instead of a ten-hour day 
with Saturday afternoons off — this change 
reducing the number of hours per week 
from 55 to 54. The minimum wage paid 
a journeyman moulder is $3.50 per day. 



MANTELS, GRATES and TILE. 

Are any of your customers building a new house ? If so, why not 
try and sell them a mantel as well as hardware? They will want 
one, and it will pay you. Write us for catalogue and price. 

THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

76 York St., TORONTO. 
28 



STOVES AND TIWV \i:i 



lliirili, tiir and Mrlul 



The Selling Qualities 

Or our splendid range 

]k Imperial Oxfort 

make them the most desirable stock you 
can handle. 

THEIR DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
FRONT DRAW-OUT ORATE 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

and other improved features, give them a quickly ap- 
preciated precedence over other ranges. 

Housewives everywhere praise them enthusiastically. 

Customers realize their superiority on sight — sales 
are easy. 

They're the popular range of Canada. 

Send us your address at once. 

IHE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 




THE QURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



NORTHERN 1 




These &r& 



JUST A FEW 



DRY COLD AIR PRINCIPLE. 



Cold Facts 



IN FAVOR OF 



]k "Northern" Refrigerator 



"It's a 

Seller" 



Raised panels. 

New style swing base 

Antique flow finish. 

Fancy brass locks and hinges. 

Hardwood ice rack. Extra large ice-box. 

Zinc-lined throughout. Galvanized Iron Shelves. 

Air space insulated with paper and wood. 

Look into It before placing orders — it will pay >ou. 
For dimensions and prices write 



TheThos. Davidson Mfg. Co., l, " ted Montreal, P.Q. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




r I"MIK Centrifugal Windmill and Manu- 
L facturing Co., Limited, Guelph, 
Ont., have been incorporated in Guelph, 
Out., to manufacture windmills, combin- 
ation anvils and hammock chairs. M. C. 
Burr, is president of the com pan) and G. 
A. Black, secretary. If a suitable factory 
cannot be secured the company will buy a 
site and build a factory. 

The James 1 lines Co. will erect a roller 
prist mill at Deloraine, Man., this summer. 

The Grimsby Manufacturing Co. lias 
resumed operations much earlier than 
usual 1 1 1 i -~ season. 

The Ogilvie Hour Mills C'o. are to 
erecl a 1,500 barrel per dav Hour mill at 

Fort William, Ont. 

Machinery for a prist mill has arrived at 
Whitemouth, Man., and the mill will pro- 
bably he erected shortly. 

Workmen employed in the moulding, 
annealing, core-making, woodworking and 
hame departments of the McKinnon Dash 
and Metal Works, St. Catharines, went 
on strike last Saturday. 

The Hates Felt Co., Dundas, Ont., have 
been incorporated; capital, $10,000. Pro- 
visional directors, C. W. Hates, Dundas; 
Wm. B. Croy, C. E. Newberry and Win, 
A. Stewart, of Hamilton. 

The J. L. Nichols Company, Toronto, 
novelty manufacturers, have been incor- 
porated ; capital, $50,000 ; provisional 
directors, I). E. Hughes, Helen Huphes 
and A. M. Sinclair, all of Toronto. 

Huston Manufacturing Company, To- 
ronto, manufacturers of fancy ^oods, have 
been incorporated ; capital, $40,000 ; pro- 
visional directors, Malcolm Cameron, R. S. 
Wilson and George H. Kilmer, all of 
Toronto. 

Along the Canadian Government tele- 
graph line into the Yukon the poles and 
wires will be substituted by an insulated 
cable, which will stand the rigors of a 
severe winter better than the poles and 
wires have done. 

Ed. Merner, president of the Hamburg- 
American Wagon Co., of New Hamburg, 

Ont., who is in Winnipeg, has wired the 
companv that he can easily sell the entire 



output there. The trade never looked 
so well. Independent. 

J. A. Hunter and J. J. Haslett, pro- 
moters of the Manitoba Cement Co., have 
secured the site for a larpe plant in Mor- 
den, Man. Hesides a free site Mordcn 
i>tU'is them lax exemption, while consider- 
able stock will be taken by citizens of the 
town. 

Dr. Kendall, M. P., of Sydney, says that 

The Dominion Iron and Steel Co., Limited, 
is making regular shipments of coal to 
Sweden, and that the iron ore received in 
return, when mixed with ore from Hell 
Island, Nfld., makes an excellent quality 
of steel. 

The formal announcement was made in 
last week's Ontario Gazette of the incor- 
poration of The Marconi Wireless Tele- 
graph Co., of Toronto, witli a capital of 
$5,000,000. The provisional directors are : 
W. R. Green, New York ; J. N. Green- 
shields, Montreal, and Walter Barwick, 
H. C. Osborne, and John Payne, of 
Toronto. 

The New York Sun says that a railway 
line will be built through United States 
territory through the heart of Alaska from 
Dawson to Port Valdez, on the coast. The 
contract for buildinp the line within three 
years lias been given to J. B. McDonald, 
of New York, who, it is said, has organ- 
ized a company that will send ."),()()() men 
to work on the road as early in the year as 

possible. 

• 
W. J. Lindsay, of St. Thomas, Out., 
promoter of the wire factor) at Colli ng- 
wood, Cut., says that as the by-law to 
bonus the factors' has been passed, opera- 
tions will shortly be proceeded with. The 
nail factors will turn out -2~t tons of wire 
nails daily, and a plant capable of produc- 
ing daily 2'i tons of wire fencing will be 
installed. The floor space, will cover an 
acre and half of ground. The company 
will pet most of their wire rods trom the 
Cramp Steel Company, and intend ultim- 
ately putting in a wire rod mill and getting 
their billets from the same concern. They 
will employ about three hundred hands 
when running a double turn daily. 

The Quebec and Lake Huron Railway, 
which is proposed to run between tide- 
water at Quebec and French River, on 

■ix 



Lake Huron, as direct as the engineers, 
T. K. Wing and M. E. Evans, can survej 
the line. Robert Campbell, vice-president 

of the Cape Breton Railway, who is inter- 
ested in the project, says that the road will 
run hundreds of miles north of any existing 
lines and, in addition to covering the dis- 
tance in less than 17"> miles, will tap a 
finely wooded and arable country, and 
would be, in the heated summer months, 
a cool route lor cereals. The company 
was incorporated last summer, and il is 
stated that if the engineers' reports arc 
favorable, Surveys will be commenced ill 
I he early spring. J. C. Cannon, of the 
Fourth National Hank of New York, and 
other American capitalists are identified 
with the enterprise. 

SYDNEY THE STEEL CENTRE. 

To-day will mark an important epoch 
in the history of Sydney, as the steamer 
Bergenhus, Capt. J. II. Svendsen, will 
steam out of the harbor, having on board 
the larpest carpo of steel ever shipped in 
the world's history. 

Five days apo the Bergenhus began 
loading, and this morning she will clear 
for Philadelphia with a full earpo of .">,2.")i! 
tons of steel, which is the larpest one ship- 
ment ever made. Sydney is yet only in 
its infacy as a shippinp port, and from the 
fact that to-day's shipment leads the 
world, some idea may be formed of what 
it will be in the course of even one year, 
when the manufacturing of steel will be 
much larper than it is at present. — Sydney 
Host, Jan. 5. 



COPPER PRODUCTION IN 1902. 

Horace J. Stevens, assistant mineral 
commissioner of the State of Michigan, 
has compiled for The Boston News Bureau 
the following estimates of copper produc- 
tion for 1902, which the agency compares 
as follows with the figures lor previous 
years (in lb. ) : 

Lake Superior 166.000,000 156,289,481 145,461,408 

Montana 218,000,000 229,870,415 270,738,489 

Arizona 140,000,000 130,778 611 118,317,764 

California 40,000,000 33,667,456 28,511,225 

Utah 31,000,000 2H.116.979 18,351,726 

Miscellaneous 62,000,000 31,340,517 24,733,484 

Totals 667,000,000 802,072,519 608,117,188 

The percentage of increase in production 
over 1901 is !). 1 percent., which compares 
with a decrease in 1901 from L900 to 0.6 
per cent, and an increase in 1900 over 
[899 of li.'i per cent. Mr. Stevens esti- 
mates the l!Mi;_' world's production of cop- 
per at 557,854 tons, an increase of 8.9 per 
cent., and comparing as follows (in tons) ; 

1902 857,764 1899 468 423 

[90] 511,803 1898 134,023 

1900 484,852 1897 405,350 

Mexico is the largest contributor to the 
past year's increase. The supply of cop- 
per on hand at present in the United 
Slates is placed by Mr. Stevens at 150,- 
0011,000 lb., or 58,000 lonplons. 



CANADIAN HARDWARK AND METAL 

How to Develop Canada's Export Trade, 

The Views of Mr. C. I£. Sontum, the Canadian Commercial Agent in Norway, 

on the Subject. 



CANADA'S expon trade is dailj be- 
z coming a matter of more vital im- 
portance to the country. As the 
number of acres under cultivation increases, 
.ukI our manufacturing facilities become 
larger the production must in time be 
greatei than the domestii demand, and, 
unless we can find .1 iv.uh market foi the 
surplus i't" our home-grown and manu- 
factured goods, disaster is sure to follow. 
This is a question which has been atji- 
tating the minds of members o( the Gov- 
ernment, the Manufacturers' Association, 
Boards of Trade, etc., foi some time past, 
;md various arguments lia\ e been advanced 
pro and con. 

Mr. C. E. Sontum, Commercial Agent 
for the Canadian Government at Christi- 
ana, Norway, a gentleman noted for hi* 
foresight and business ability, writing to 
the Ministei o( Trade and Commerce, 
Ottawa, on July :s, L902, in an able letter 
discussing tliis subject, said : 

I notice by the Canadian trade papers that a 
discussion is going on as to what the Government 
could possibly do in order to increase the Cana- 
dian export. A similar discussion has been going 
on here for some lime, and has resulted in the 
Govrrnment establishing an information office, 
where the trade can get all kinds of information 
regarding the export It is too «arly yet to ex- 
press anything about how this office is fulfilling its 
place ; but it seems as if the trade expects it to do 
wonders at once, and some dissatisfaction lias 
already been noted. Some people hold that the 
jealousy among the trade in the same line s will 
make it difficult to satisfy all. I. for my part, be- 
lieve that one of the best ways of increasing trade 
is thn ugh trade papers. Throughout the whole 
world English is in a remarkable way becoming 
the commercial language, so it is understood by 
almost all of the educated classes, besides nearly 
all of the schools here teach English . Several 
trade papers in the Scandinavian countries are now 
being printed part in English and part in Scandina- 
vian, i. e., The fermand, which is the largest trade 
paper in Norway, and The Danish Export Review 
(Denmark) is printed exclusively in English. If, 
through a reduced postage, Canadian trade news- 
papers could be more extensively mailed to all of 
the exchanges in Europe. I believe this would be 
one of the best pushes the Canadian export could 
get 

In order to learn more full) Mr. Son- 
turn's views witli regard to the value of 
trade paper-, in tin extension of our export 
trade, Lieut.-Col. J. 1>. Mac Lean, Presi- 
dent of The Mac Lean Publishing Co., on 
October -i last, wrote him asking to bo 
favored with particulars, .11 the same time 
directing him to the work of the Canadian 
Manufacturers' Association here. 

The following interesting and compre- 
hensive replj was received under date 
of October 28. 

In possession cl yours of October 3. I am 
obliged to von for your kind remarks in regard to 
my repor:s as Canadian commercial agent. I am 
also obliged to you for calling my attention to the 
lias Manufacturers' Association, and I might 
si ite, at the same time, that I nave read with con- 
siderable interest in vour valuable paper the 
- there have been in regard to the pro- 
motion of Canadian trade, and this is of so much 
more interest to me, as. during the last 
the question has been verj actual also in tluscoun- 
trv. and much agitation has been going on among 
our manufacturers and export-houses. The de- 
mand for official assistance and pressure on the 



Storthing (Parliament) linally resulted in IDC 

establishing ol an information bureau, irh< 1 
trade can gel • very information in connection with 

the export. 

In my opinion, what 1 ' lovernmenl 
all] do tor as manufacturer! and expo 

IIS I ollillilin : 

Influence to obtain the I ith on 

land and sea, besid ng the postage on all 

magazines and trade papers, as well a 
to a minimum. 

1 1 tend speakers to Europe holding lei 
about Canadian products, as I noticed a member 
of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association sug- 
gested, would, in my opinion, not result in much. 
On the other hand, a trade paper whi( fa 
by an importer will always interest linn il I 
live man, as it will teach bin something. He will 
there get news and ideas, both suggested editorial!) 
and from the advertisements, and the paper will 
lay on his desk awaiting him to pick it up when he 
has a moment to 

Now, right here. I will say something about 
advertising which I believe will interest you It is 
very common, of course, that the papers advise 
people to advertise, and statements and figures 
are given about such and such well-known hi 
who are known to do a great deal of business, that 
they spend so much for advertising, etc , during 
the year. It is, without doubt, true it pays to 
advertise, but I believe it often looks to merchants 
and exporters likethe paper is keeping on hammer- 
ing at this in their own interest about the same as a 
commercial traveller talking for his goods, which 
to a certain extent it does ; but, nevertheless, it is 
a nailed-down fact that advertising pays. 

A United States manufacturer would hardly 
think of getting business in Europe by advertising 
in Canada. I can, from actual experience, tell 
you such things happen, and I believe very often. 
Here is an example, which happened me : I no- 
ticed some years -igo in THE ( an \m an ( iR< n 1 k 
time and time again a small advertisement for 
"Tanglefoot'' sticky fly-paper, something I had 
then never heard of before. finally, one day I 
said to myself, if that firm can keep on advertising 
tint article there must be something in it, and if a 
United States firm can sell it in Canada we might 
be able to sell it in the Scandinavian countries. 
We wrote them asking for samples and qnotations, 
offered it to the trade, it took, and proved to be a 
good article. We now buy it every year and have 
done so for seven years, not by the box or by hun- 
dred boxes, but by the carload and when we hive 
a warm summer it seems as if we cannot get 
enough of it Even up to this moment The O. & 
W. Thum Co., manufacturers of the fly-paper, 
have no idea that they got their Scandinavian trade 
through advertising in a Canadian trade paper, as 
I will confess I forgot to mention your paper when 
I first wrote to them. 

There are other firms from whom I have bought 
considerable goods through the advertisements in 
vour Canadian trade papers. I can mention, for 
instance, I he Tillson ( ompan\ When ( anada is 
on the right side of the market, so thev can com- 
pete against the I niled Slates exporters. I have no 
difficulty in placing orders for carloads with this 
firm, as the goods we have had from them have 
been of the very best quality— second to none. 

I had also recently a shipment of corn Hour 
from St. Lawrence Starch Co. From this firm I 
buy regularly what I can sell of their goods and 
have never lud any complaints. Infact. I must say, 
this is to the praise of < anadian exporters, that 
with the exception of apples. I have never had any 
trouble with Canadian goods, and the merchants 
here are getting to look with increasing confidence 
on goods of ( anadian manufacture. You have in 
!a some firms who have in their different 
lines been the standard-bearers, so to speak, for 
Canadian trade all over the world I will only 
mention a lew such tirms ; for instance. Messrs 
1 Walker \ Sons, distillers of 'Canadian 

iiub" whisk\ , The Dominion Radiator Co.. 
Limited manufacturers of " Satford " radiators. 
Ogilivies. and Lake Of the Woods flour Mills, and 
rris, etc Walkers' " Canadian Club " 
whisks can be had in all the 1" mis in 

corner ol Europe I think that Walkers 
have done 1 m liquor trade what a 

couple of Havana manufacturers of cigars have 
done for the tobacco trade of Cuba, because of the 

29 



■ in . 1 n.t 1 1 c y ol il I 

■ world, althoug 

all ..t tl 

than the best of othei 

think, it 1. happening with Walkers' 

I hib ' w Insky. < '.inadi 111 w hisl 

in Amerii ■ now 

idian ' lub. 1 

know this linn ,■■ well that it would be 

unnei • mention thi 

nig in. Their boti 
how ■ ■ r\ thing in connection with 

Walkers, ot Walkerville, giw the foreigner to 
understand that tins firm belong! 10 II 

conducted with great ability I havenoth 

ing to do with tl dian Club," but 

I have often heard remarks about it 

A Canadian article I have been working very 
much with 1 from The Dominion kadi- 

alor Co., of Toronto, whose advei are in 

your Hardware and Metal I 1 
here considered C tbeil " Saflbrd 

patent prevents the possibility of any leak. My 
firm has furnished these radiators to a nun. 
both official and private buildings during thi 
six years. Ol Government buildings which are 
heated with Dominion radiators, I will only im-n- 
tion the Insane Asylum of Christiana, the Govern- 
ment Hospital at Christiana, the Government 
Agricultural Schools, the Technical Schoals at 
Drontheim. the Stavanger I'nson at Stavanger, the 
Reserve Prison at Christiana, the Government 
Manufactory of Arms at Kongsberg. the Artillerv 
Barracks at Christiana and many others. We 
have also sold their radiators in Sweden f inland 
and Denmark. 

Lately there has, as you know been very hard 
limes in Northern Europe, and everything is about 
at a standstill. Now, let me say something which, 
if I am right, might be of use lo some of your 
readers, and which. I being at a distance. 1 
have a better chance to notice that they have. Of 
late years, on account of the very good times in 
the United States, their manufacturers have had a 
good and steadily increasing business, as the home 
consumption has been large, and on account of the 
large dividends there have been started an enor- 
mous lot of new factories. The overproduction is 
now commencing. We receive almost by every 
mail more and more offers for different kinds of 
goods at lower prices than before. This is bad. 
and I believe that inside of two vears there will be 
an enormous crash in the United States and goods 
will be offered at almost anything. How this will 
affect (.'anada you know yourself. 

No doubt there ought to be some careful- 
ness in starting new factories iust now In 
fact, il I was in America to-day, I would sell what 
I had of stocks of every kind, as I believe the top 
prices have now been reached. I would, instead, 
invest in land in the Canadi.n West. Now, this is 
my individual opinion, and I believe I am right. 
What may delay the knock a little is the excellent 
harvest they have had in ilie United States but it 
is sure to c.ine. When I. eight or nine vears ago, 

1 Canada and the United States ,1 
Commercial Commissioner in the Intel 
we^ian export, the tim re flourishing and 

the merchants were overestimating everything, as 
people are liable to do in good times. Old factories 
were enlarged and new ones built and everything 
increased so rapidly, but when the crash ca 
few years later, one institution after the other was 
closed and wound up, including half a dozen 
banks. 

Now the lustare suffering with the unjust, and I 
.unafraid the same might happen 11 
there came a crash in the Cnited Stat 
American manufacturers would have to offer their 
goods at less than cost price. 

Yours, respectfully. 
• 

These remarks, coming 1- the) do 
.1 gentleman holding as importa -;.i position 
in foreign trade as Mi Sontum docs, can- 
not bin have their effect upon Canadian 
business men who are interested in export. 



Hunin-are and Metul 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, Januarj 16, 1'.'03. 

HARDWARE. 

BUSINESS in the wholesale hardware 
trade is steady and quite a number 
of orders for spring delivery have 
been received during the pasl week There 
i- nothing very startling to report as re 
garde prices, as the markel in nearly all 
lm<>- of shelf goods i< steady, an ad 
vance of 1" to I") per cent, has occurred 
in pumps. The cheaper grade of axes 
have advanced 81 per dozen and the bet- 
mes, 50c. per dozen. Tinsmiths' tools 
have also advanced from 5 to 15 per 
cent. 'The market for -Kate- for the sea 
son just closed was not up to former 
years, although dealers are perfectly sat 
isfied with the trade done. Hockey sticks 
have had a big sale and there are still 
quite a few going out through the job- 
bers. 

I WW MOWERS.— It is a little early 
lor lawn mowers, hut a few orders have 
taken during the past week. Prices 
are as follows : lOA-in. wheel by 12-in 
cutter, S7.50 ; by 14-inch cutter, 88.00 ; 
by 16 - inch do, S8.50 ; by 18-inch 
do, S9.00 ; by 20 - inch do, 810.00. 
Star, 9-inch wheel by 12-inch cutter, 
85.50; bv 14-inch do, 85.75; by 16-inch 



do, 86. Daisv, 8-inch wheel by 12-inch 
cutter, 84.90 ; by 11-inch do, 85.10; by 
16-inch do, 85.30. Philadelphia pattern, 
74-inch wheel by 10-inch cutter, 86 ; bv 
12-inch do, 86.50 ; by 14-inch do, 87 ; by 
16-inch do, 87.50. Grass boxes are quot- 
ed as follows : 12-inch, 82.25 ; 14-inch, 
82.25 ; 16-inch, 82.50 : 18-inch, 82.50 j 20- 
inch, 82.75. The discount on all the 
above is 50 per cent. off. 

BARB WIRE.— Verv little business is 
doing. We quote : 82.90 per 100 lt». f.o.k 
Montreal ; 82.55 f.o.b., Cleveland, in car- 
lots of 15 tons; 82. 67^ f.o.b., Cleveland, 
in smaller lots. 

GALVANIZED WISE— The movement 
is slow and prices remain unchanged. 
Quotations are as follows : No. 5, 83.70; 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8, 83.15; No. 9, 82.65; Mo. 
10, 83.20; No. 11, 83.25; No. 12, 82.80; 
No. 13, 82.90; No. 14, 83.75. In carlots, 
f.o.b. Cleveland : No. 5, 82.20; Nos. 6, 7, 
8 and 9, 82.15; No. 10, 82.20; No. 11, 
82.25; No. 12, 82.30; No. 13, 82.40; No. 
14, 82.50. In less than carlots, 12£c. per 
100 lb. extra is charged. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— There are a 
few orders being received, but the mar- 
ket is quiet and prices are unchanged. 
We quote: Bright and annealed, 82.50 
per 100 ft. f. o. b. Montreal, Toronto, 
Halifax, London, Hamilton and St. John. 
Net extras per 100 ft. are now as fol- 



lows : Coppered wire, GOe.; tinned wire, 
82 ; oiling, 10c; spring wire, 81.25 ; best 
steel wire, 75c; bright soft drawn, 15c; 
special hay-baling wire, 30c. 

FINE WIRE.— Orders are very scarce 
on this market. Discount is still 25 per 
cent, with the following extras : 1 and 2- 
tb. hanks, 25c per 100 ft.; ^-ft. hanks. 
37£c. and £-ft. hanks, 50c 

BBASS AND COPPER WIRE. -The 
market for both these wires is very slow. 
They are discounted at 62£ per cent. 

PENCE STAPLES.— The business that 
has transpired on the local market has 
been a few orders for jobbers, and was 
done on a basis of 83 per 100-ft. keg for 
galvanized staples and 82.80 for bright, 
with 25c extra for 25 and 50-ft. pack 
ages. 

WIRE NAILS.— Trade is quiet and the 
prices remain unchanged. We quote as 
follows : Carlots, 82.40 and small lots at 
82.45 per keg f.o.b. Montreal, London, 
Hamilton, Toronto, Brantford, Windsor, 
Ont., and St. John. 

CUT NAILS. — An improvement is to be 
noted, but as yet the market is quiet. In 
carlots, the price is 82.40 per keg and in 
small lots. 82.45 per keg. 

HORSE NAILS.— Everything is very 
quiet in this market, but the prices are 
firm at last week's quotations. Discounts 



FIRE ON FRIDAY, JAN. 9. 



Contracts for rebuilding made Jan. 12. 
Output will be normal by Jan. 26 or 30. 

Principal warehouses (filled to the garrets) were not touched by the 
flames. 

Tinsmiths started to work Monday morning. 

Our large spacious warehouses at London, Toronto, Montreal, 
Winnipeg, Vancouver and St. John, N. B. are all well filled with goods, 

and though our loss is heavy it will not affect our regular course of business. 
All orders will be filled in our usual prompt manner. 



rhe 

LONDON, 



McClary Manufacturing Co 

TORONTO. MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

"Everything for the Tinshop." 

30 



THE MARKETS 



Until., •>!<■ unit Mrlnl 



ENGLISH 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 

FIRB 

BUILDING 

ENAMELLED 

SILICA 

MAGNESIA 

DRAIN 
CULVERT 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



BRICKS. 



I PIPES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



i|WJkPU4«J%.lWM. 



SEWE 



mi. 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

rat CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON. OUT. TORONTO. OUT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleab'e 
Castings, Boiler lubes, Engine Cylinders. IK 
draulic and other Machinery wh-re grrat strength 
i«r qui-ed; Strong, High Silicon Iron, i jt Foundry 
Purposes. 



u 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with (onnellsville Coke as Fuel, Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands 



Writ* for Pries to Sales Agents 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND. ONT. 



Limited 



1 brand, 10, \>> and ~i oor 

• -.■tit off; « > 1 1 "M" brand, "Oval 

• .hi . " New ' i iy ." 51 A per oei I 
Countei unl." 56 i"-i oen1 ; "Monarch," 
65 i"'i cen t . Peerli ." ~> n and 7 A pei 

..lit 

HORSESHOl 9 l bi r« i a stead 
mand and pi ice are quiti firm P 
follow : li light and medium, 

pattern, No. - and Ini '■<<>. I 

and ■mailer, 83.60 ; snow pattern, No. 1 
and larger, 83.60 ; Xo. 1 and imaller, 
8 I. ti'il shoea, new light pat 
tarn, sizes I to ">, No. 2 and lai 
|S IS No. I hikI smaller, I ither 

weight, all sizes, II to I, *"> ; toe weight, 
all si/r.s. I to I. 16.25. Sboe>, more than 
ize in a keg, 10c, per keg extra 
P.o b Mon 1 1 eal only. 

IM\ l I S VND Bl RRS Di A 
n few orders, Imt Bay the marl. 
quiet Qui itat i( ms at e a f< >lli ■ ■■■■ I'. < 
iron rivets, section carriage, and w 
box, black rivets, tinned do , coopers' 
rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent. ; swedes iron burrs are quot 
eel at 55 per cent, off ; copper rivets, 
with the usual proportion of burrs, 15 
per cent, off and coppered iron rivets and 
burrs, in 5-lb. carton boxes are quoted 
at GO and 10 per cent. olT list. 

BOLTS IlNDNUTS. There is no change 

to note in bolts and nuts this week, 

mid the discounts arc quoted as follows : 
Norway oarriage bolts, .">."> per cent. 
common. 50 per cent ; full square car- 
riage bolts, 55 per cent.: machine bolts. 
50 and 5 per cent.: coach screws, 60 2-3 
per cent. ; sleighshoe bolts, 65 and 5 
per cent.: blank bolts, 50 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 50 and 5 per cent. ; 
plough bolts, 50 and 5 per cent. To any 
retailer an extra discount of 10 per cent 
is allowed. Tire bolts, 67* per cent. ; 
stove bolts, 67* per cent. Nuts, square. 
3!c. per lb. off list; hexagon nuts, 3?c. 
per lb. off list. To all retailers an extra 
discount of ic. per lb. is allowed. 

SCREWS.— There is no visible improve- 
ment in screws, and discounts are un- 
changed. Our quotations are as follows : 
Round head bright, S2i and 10 per cent.; 
flat head bright, S7i and 10 per cent. ; 
brass, round heads. 75 and 10 per cent.; 
brass, flat heads. SO and 10 per cent. 

CORDAGE.— The market is very quiet 
and prices are unchanged. We quote : 
Pure manila, 1 lc; British pure manila, 
12c; sisal, lie; double lathvnrn, lie. J 
single lathy arn, 10?,c. 

BTJ1LDING PAPER.— The movement in 
building paper is light and prices are the 
as Ias1 quoted. Our quotations 
are as follows: Tarred felt. |1.75 per 
100 lb.; 2-plv. readv-roofing, Oflc. tier roll; 
Si 15 per roll; carpel felt, 82.26 per 
100 ft).: dry sheathing, 35c. per roll; tar 
sheathing. 15c. per roll; drv fibre. 50c. 
per roll; tarred fibre, 60c. per roll. K 
and T X L, 65c. per roll; heavy straw and 
Bheathing, S30 per ton: slaters' felt, 60c. 
per roll. 

SCREEN WIRE CT.OTTT.— The market 
is practically at a standstill. The price 
quoted is si in pgr 100 square ft. 

PTREBRICES— Trade is quiet, and the 

are as follows : English, s 16 to 

rnd Scotch, 117 to 122 per 1,000. 
CEMENT. There is a small amount of 
business being transacted at last week's 
quotations We quote as follows ; Can- 
adian cement, 81.90 to 12.25; German, 
82.20 to 12.30; English, 12.15 to - 
Belgian, 81.70 to 11.96 per barrel ,-\ 
store, and American, 12 10 to 12.90 ex 



SANDERSONS CAST STEEL, 

Full lino in stock 

REELED MACHINERY, 
SPRING, TIRE, TOE CAULK, 



Belt English and American makes. 



Etc. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merchants Bank Building. 
MONTREAL. 



A Good Thing 

to keep in -tuck i» our line ol pu 
Phey an 1. 1 tin- 

dernier need bare no hesitation In Induc- 
ing iiny |*rsim to bay one lor. if the 

pumps are not as represi nted, we are wiii- 
iiik to take imck the goods and refund 
the money. 

Is this not S tail offer ' 



McDougall Pumps 
"Made 



The R. 

McDougall 
Co., Limited, 

OALT, ON T., 

Manufacturers of 1 ligh 







Pig Tin. 



"Boustead «5» Co's" Penang 
"Straits" 



'Lamb and Flag" 



Copper 
Galvanized Sheets. 



"Lake" 



ADMl HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

**"-*" '— -■- m t 

Ferrona Pig lion 

And SIEMENS EARTH 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



:il 



f/artln 



.1111/ Mrt.il 



THE MARKETS 



S\o\\ SHO> ELS \ fair business is 
i done l>> jobbers, and our i 
as follows: " Habitant," $2.25 to 
$2 I" : " Victor," 10 per cent, off ; Bteel 
railroad shovels, l v and 5 per rent. off. 

I'l RE silt >\ E is. I'h,:. is a ma li 
trade doing. The discounts are unchan- 
u quotations follow : No. 70, 
.'!M to I"'- pei dozen; No. 55, 55 to 60c; 
90 . No 60, 82$ to 90c 
81.45; No. 80, 50 to 
Duplex," 7. 81.21; No-. !>. 

52 No II. 81.82. 
SKA! I > I'Ik- busini 
i- at an end as far a^ 
trade are concerned. We 
pattern, 36c. |>er 
per pair; ladies' 



ladies' 
plain hockey 
uockej . 60c 
81.50 to 83. 
IKH'kKN 
small movement in 
prices are unchanged 



for tlii^ season 
the wholesale 

quote: Halifax 
pair; nickel plated, 65 
uickel-plated, 60c.; per 



concave nickel-plated, 81.35; 

27c. to 81-35; nickel-plated 

to $2.50; double end hockey, 

Skate .-traps. 35c. to 81-35. 

STICKS. There is still a 

this line and th«j 

Quotations ale as 



follow- B '..I growth, goal Keep 

ei-'. 84.20 per doz.; ash. 82.90; elm, 82.25; 
boys' elm, 81.10; common, 90c. Regula- 
tion pucks, 81.50 per doz. 

COAL HODS, -Very few coal hods have 
been >ol.l during the past week. Pii.,- 
follow : Japanned, 16-in., 84.50 per do/.; 
IT in.. S4.SU; |8-in., 85.10; with gold band. 



r 



85.10; IS in., 85.40. Galvanized. 



IG in., 86.20; IT in., 86.50; 18-in., 86.80 per 

do7. The discount is 45 per cent. 

I. LNTERNS. There is a fair trade do 
iog in lanterns at unchanged prices. We 
quote as follows: Tilt, lift or hinge, No. '. 
•^ 1 per doz.; Cold Wast, 87 per doz.; dash- 
board. No. li. 85.75 per dozen ; cold-blast 
dashboard. si) per dozen. Kxtras are as 
follows: Japanning, 50c. per dozen ; cop 
per plating cold blast, §2 per dozen. The 
prices quoted are f.o.b. London, Hamil 
iltoii, Toronto, Belleville, Kingston and 
Montreal. 

METALS. 

The market for metals has been very 
steady during the past week with no 
striking feature. Ingot copper is linn, a 
slight advance having taken place, and 
indications point to another within the 
next few days. Ingot tin has also ad- 
.1 and i- -till going up, and it i-' 
not at all improbable that it will go 2 
or 3c. higher. There i- nothing of iin- 
p. rtance to report from the to eign mar- 
kets. 

BAR [RON. Then- is a fair trade do- 
iiil and the prices are steady. Prices 
follow : .Merchant-' bar, ■-<:> ; horseshoe 
iion. 82.25; forged iron. 82.20. 

BLA( K SHEETS. \ fair movement is 
reported and quotations are unchanged 
Wc quote: 28 gauge, $2.65; 26 gaug-j, 
S2.60; 20 to 24 gauge, 82 5 I; B to 20 
gauge, 82.50. 

IRON, 
as last 
quiet. 

■J- Queen's Head, 84.40; 
1.30 ; Fleur dv Lis, 
84.15: Hornet, 84.10; -Bell" brand 8-1.05. 
For less than case lots 25c. extra is char- 
ged. 

I.K \l> PIPE. A fair business is doing 
Composition and waste are quoted at s ' . 
and ordinary at 7c. The discounl i- 37j 

per cent. 

I RON PI PE. There is no change in the 

market from a week ago. Prices are a- 
follov Standard pipe, per 100 

in li - under 19 feet : Black, J 

$2.40 . §, 82.65; \, 82.85; I i,. . 



GALVANIZED 
al out the same 
ness i- rep< >i ted 

as follows . No 

Apollo, lOj oz . 



I lie price- ;.; ■'.• 
week, and Iiii~i 

Our prices are 




NICHOLSON F-IL.E 

PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 

Cast Steel FILES and RASPS, High Grade 

FOR HOME AND EXPORT TRADE. 

Largest File Manufacturers in the W "- 1H 

Seven Distinct Factories. 



The well-known " Nicholson " and " X. F." brands are made exclusively at 
our Providence works from best selected steel, by experienced workmen, 
and are exported to all parts of the globe, and command the highest prices. 



DOMINION WORKS 



F»ORT MOPE, CANADA. 

Daily production : 6od dozen, including " Globe," " Kearney & Foot," and other bnnds. 

Walter Grose, selling Agent. Montreal 



THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



SILVER PLATED WARE. 




thing in 



Silver- Plated, Hollow, and Flat Ware, Soda and Bar Spoons, etc. 



NEW DESIGNS AND LOW PRICES. 

A very wide range in Flat Ware — many beauliful pieces. 

IF YOU HAVEN'T OUR CATALOGUE, WRITE FOR IT. 

E.W.Gilmore & Bro./Ts. B ...di.t"'o7i'J Toronto 



SOLDER. 

Half-and-Half, Wire, Bar, Angle, and Plumbers all grades. 
IF YOU USE, DROP US A LINE. 



THE CANADA METAL CO , ^treLt? TORONTO. 



IF YOU WANT LIGHT AT SMALLEST COST 

Use "Brilliant" or "Radiant Shelby" Incandescent Lamps 

Special Prices ro Large Lighting Companies. 



Walter Grose, 

Selling Agent. Mon vv.v. Vl 

32 



Manufactured t>y 
The Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Canada. 



Till. MARKETS 



Hardware und '• 



|5 |0 l j. s: :::,. i 2-in., 113 

Galvanized, \. 33.29; |, 13 US . 

I s:, . i in., J7.20 .11. sum:, ; 1$, | 

j inch, sir, -:, I- rtra beavj pip>«. 
|,lam ends, in,- quoted pa I" 11 feet as 
follows - Black, '.. H 20 l-in., 

sT .",.", ; I ! . |10 56 . I ',. 112 75 ; - in . 

alvanized, '.. 16.20 . , . |6 66 I in . 

jty 5 . i [, J13.26 ; l*. S16 ; 2 in., 121.90 
l,,, Lhread and coupling 6 pai oent. is 
added 

I |\|'|. \ i i ■ .- I be kx al and Ion 
markets are both quiet. We quote as fol 
lo« i loke . $4-25 and i barcoals, |4. ■'< 
to |6 26 

BOIL PIPE \Mi FITTINGS I be mai 
K,. t i,, i thi ' - quiet and pi u e 

unchanged. I be diw ounti follow : Light 
soil pipej ;5 to inch, 60 pas oent., Die 
tlium and extra heavy aoil pipe, - to 6- 
null, tin per oent.; extra heavy soil pipe, 
8-inch, 46 pei cent.; light fittings, 2 to 6- 
inoh, 50 und 10 per oent.; m e di u m and 
extra heavy fittings, 9 to 6-inch, 60 pei 
oenl . extra heavy fittings, B-inch, 45 per 
oent . 

IM< ; [EON. I here ifl nothing ,,f impo 
;il „... doing. We quote 123.50 to |24 60 
, \ store, Mont i sal. 

INGOT COPPER. II"' copper markol 
i, very firm and an advance is looked 
for. We quote $13.50 to SI 1.50 per 100 
II,. 

INGOT TIN. There has bean an ad- 
vance m ingot tin, and we now quote 130 
to S32 per 100 tt>. 

I'll , 1.1', \l> The market is quiet and 
prices steadj In earlots the price is 
sj.'.tii and in small lots, |3.25. 

STEI l Bo in i quiet and few ord- 
ers are being booked this week. Prices 
art unchanged. Quotations are as 'ol- 
lows : Sleighshoe, $2.10 to $2.20 ; tire, 
$2.20 to $2.25 ; bar, $2.05; spring, $2.88 
to $3; reeled machinery, $2.75; toecalk, 
$2.60 to $2.90 . machinery (iron finish), 
$2.10; mild steel, $2.05; square harrow, 
$2.15. 

TOOL STEEL. Then' is nothing to te 
port in tin- line, but the market prices 
are very firm. We quote as follows: 
Black Diamond, Be; Sanderson's, 8 to 
12c, according to the grade; Jessop 
13c.; Leonard's, 7$c.; Jonas & Colvera, 
Hi to 20c; "Aii Hardening,' 65c per lt>. 
i \\\H\ I'l \ I I S .-Galvanized plates 
are moving freely "and the market price 
is steady. Our quotations are as fol- 
lows : 52s, $2.70 to $2.80 ; 60s, $2.85 to 
$2.80 to $2.85; full polished, 
7.', an«l galvanised, $4.25 to $4.36 ; gal- 
vanized 70s, $4. 15 to $4 56 

I ERNE I'l \ I ES We quote $7 50 

0011 CH \l\ The market for coil 

chain is firm and the demand continues 

to be brisk. Our quotations are as 

follows . No 6, 10c : No •">. 9c ; No. I. 

N.. ::. 7 ' m . i', '., per lt>.: 5-16. 

16 exai t. $5 26 $4 30 . 7 16, 

si in . i. >i . 9 16, $3.80 - ■ 70 ; J, 

In $3 50 In carload 

lots an allowance of 10c. is mad,'. 

SHEET ZINC There ate no sales being 
mad,-. We quote $6.50 to $6.75 

\N riMONl This metal i- quiet. W< 
quote 10c. 

/INC SI'll I ER. There are no orders 
being received at present. We quote s ". _" 

SOLDER. \ fairly good trade is i 
in solder. We quote Bar solder, 20c and 

wire -older', is,-. 

SCRAP METALS 

The scrap metal markel i- active at 

pi,-, Mil and the prices ale firm. All the 



OUR CATALOGUE 



An 

Encyclopaedia 
For Builders. 



* 



In it you will lind full information 
about all the popular Sheet Metal 
Building Materials used so universally 
and by up-to-date workers. 

If you're not posted, read up 
our catalogue — its full of practical information. 

You can't cater to the best and biggest building trade 
without our lines. 

When ordering from us you re certain of highest 
quality, for that's our specialty. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 



TORONTO. 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG! 



* 
4 

* 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



V£*$**$e*^*{ r *4**|*»$*4*4*4*4**'i : * 4* 4* 4* 4* 4*^* *$■•*$* 4* «$**$• *-£**$* *$* *f*X 



principal dealers have a large stock on 
hand, but do not think it will last long, 
as they expect to be very busy shipping 
for the next week or bo. Our quota 
tions are still as follows: Heavy co 

and wire. 9c. per lb.; light coppei 
liea\ \ red brass, 10c. ; heavy yellow, 8^c; 
light brass, 5c; lead, 2 to '2|c; zinc, '2k 
to 2Jc; iron. No. ! wrought, SI5 to $16 
No J. *7 per ton; machinery scrap, 116.50 
to SIT: stove plate. -Si:5; malleable and 
steel, 96; mixed country tags, 60 to 70c. 
per 100 lb.; old rubbers, (tj to <>Je. per 
pound. 

RAW FURS. 

The market shows no new feature of 
importance. Nex1 week, commencing on 

the UUh inst. the London fur sales take 
and prices will be announced for 
the following three months. We quote: 



HIDES. 

There is no change in bides and busi 
ness continues t,> be brisk. Oui i 

follow : N,. I In I No. 2, 6$C. ; 

No ::. :, '., . calf skins, 8 to *l"< 

lambskin-. 



MON1 RKAI. 



NOTES 

lii m and 



ad 



Ingot copper is verj 
vance is looked for. 

Ingot tin has advanced this week and 
we are now quoting it al 130 to $32 't 
is thought that it will ^, -till higher. 



Lennis &. Finkelstein, general merchants, 

Stonewall. Man., have dissolved partnei 

ship ; 1 1- nr ■■ | .ranis continu 



Bl Wl'.P. Labrador ami <)ioi,', Kasl.ni sr.iii 

Territory Bma? Monntaioa and Western 

Strictl} Prime, ,,r. No. 1 6.00 

Partly hm „r, No. '.' 



Uedi'm Small 



kill- 
>1 1 SO 



3.00 

i ^ i 

Large 

13.00 

1 

D 

6 50 

t ,<i 
L00 

Dark 

, \ alue prin, iimlly m to beauty, also nisei n. In.. 

Silver 1 n ■""' """ Northern 



I'liprilli,'. or. Xii. 

Flat, weak, or p'„,r. ,,r. N,. 

BBAB Blaok Choice onlj .., 

Brown 

BADQBB Of all tlons 

FISHER Eastern and far North-Eastern 
Territory and Western 

I o\ Red North Eastern and similar One l.rinlit red kin, Is 
i | Western 



90 75 

."HI 
HI 

Moll 111 Small 



4.00 

3.00 

2.00 

50 



9 im 

2.00 

75 

.85 



Pacific Coast, Territory and Weetern 

\ \ \ \ in North East, rn 

Territory end Western 

M WHT\ British Columbia, Northern Pacific anil similar 

and « . -i, -rn 

" 



10,00 

1 

Hr,,wn 
• 
5.00 

Small 
1 75 
IIS 
Pair 



7.50 

10 
P 
5.00 

1 

1 I'", 
1 in 

Pale 

i .-I 

• 

10.00 



=. z. = 

111 
3 



I .aw Medi In Small 
Park Brown 



Pale 

i o 



i 
\ 

50 

■ 

I 

100 
100 

1 75 



Eg z 

V. arl * 



ami Ontario. ,1.00 

ljir«'r Medi in Small . 
MINK II ,hi o ffti N rth East, n ind 1.01 

Territorj ami H ' 50-100 1 50 1 GO 

Bprl '■'• I 

MCSKRA1 !',•!■ rn. U'Sl larf. 



3 

1 75 
1 00 

4 
111 

n 

3 

i a 

■ 

3 

i 00 

Small 



4 
SO 



4 

■M 

I 

'.ii 

3 
(J) 






Territorj and w 



,t., pi 07 
- .u i 3 

OTTEK ljil,ru.l„r »n,l far N„rtl , I 
Territorj and Western 

. j i i 3 

I- \ \ 

B \ irdini to dart I Ih'.iiu> IS 

Hla.k Sli a 

-kl NK ' ' 05-1 

l>ark I 
WOLVKRIN1 \ i irding to dark •' LOO I " 1 '■■ 



1 

SI 

4 



' 



, 18TORE1 M 



|t.00 per pouad. 



:{.{ 



Hardteare mmd Metal 



THK MARKETS 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

HARDWARE. 
Toronto, Januarj 16, L903 

0RD1 LtsS from travellers are now com 
i reel) In ever) respect 
the -i-ii^t >n i- starting off in bettor 
shape than last year. The business re 
ported, both from travellers' orders and 
b) letter, is i>! a sorting nature, and 
- in a large \ olume of trade foi 
this time <>t year. Prices are stead) ; al 
most featureless. 

BARB W IRE a fen inquiries, but Dot 
man) orders are reported. Base price is 
as follows 82.674 from Cleveland, and 

I2.U-. K.-> in carlots. From stock, To- 
runt' 

GALVANIZED WIRE. The markel is 
featureless. Prices are unchanged. Our 
flotations are as follows: No-. 6, 7 ami 8, 
53.15 to 13.36 per 100 lb.; No. 9, §2.65 
82.85; No. 10, 83.20 to S3. JO; No. 11. 
83.25 to 13.45; No. 12. 82.80 to S3; No. 
I.!. J2.90 to 83,10; No. 14, S3. 75 to 83.95; 
No. 15, 84.30; No. 16. §4.55. Nos. G to '.) 
base from Cleveland are quoted at §2.27.1 
in loss than carlots. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE— There is not 
much movement, but some inquiries are 
being received. We quote the base price 
as follows: 82.50 per 100 lb. Oiling, 
hi.-.; coppering, tiOc. and tinning, §2 per 
100 lli nxtra. Shipping points, Toronto, 
Hamilton. London and Montreal, with 
freights equalized on those points. 

WIRE NAILS. Oiiler- are coming in 
nicely. Prices are unaltered. We quote as 
follows : 82.45 per keg and 5c. less for 
carlots. The shipping points are To- 
ronto, Hamilton, London, Oananoque and 
Montreal. 

CUT NAILS. There is nothing doing. 
We (piote 82.50 per keg. 

HORSE N ULS. There is not much 
doing tin- week. Price- are unchanged. 
Discounts are as follows: "C" brand, oval 
head. Id and 10 and ~l per cent.; on 
"M" brand, 50, Id and 5 per cent.; on 
"Monarch,*' 65 per cent., and "Counter- 
sunk" bead, (55 per cent.; "Peerless," 50 
and 7 1 per cent. 

HORSESHOES. Market is quiet and 
are unchanged. Quotations are as 

follow-: Iron -hoe-, \,,. ■) anx | larger, light 
medium and heavy, £3.45; snow shoes, 
§3.7U ; light steel shoes, 83.55 ; feather- 
weight lall sizes), 84.95; iron shoes, No. 
1 and smaller, light, medium and heavy 
(all si 70; snow shoes, 84; light 

steel shoes, 83.80; featherweight lall 
sizesi, 84.95. 

3( REWS \ fair sorting trade con 
tinues at steady pricee We quote as 
follow- : Flat head bright, 87$ and 10 
per cent, discount; round head bright, 
S24 and H) per cent.; Oat head brass, 80 
and 10 per cent.; round head brass, 75 
and 10 per cent.; round head bronze, 05 



per cent, and Hat head bronze. 70 per 
cent. 

Kl\ II S Wll I'd RRS. The demand is 
improving. Boiler rivets are in partie/ii 
larly good request on account of the ac- 
tivity at large boiler work-. Quotations 
are as follows: Iron rivets, i>0 and 10 per 
cent, discount ; iron buns, 55 per cent. ; 
copper > nets, with usual proportion fi 
burrs. 15 per cent. ; copper burrs alone, 
30 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS \ND NUTS. Business has pick- 
ed up with a rush, machine shops now 
being unusually busy. Prices follow : 
Carriage bolts, common ($1 list), 50 per 
cent.; carriage bolts, full square (82.40 
list), 55 and 10 per cent.; carriage boils, 
Norway iron ($3.00 list), 55 and 10 per- 
cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 50 and 10 
per cent.; coach screws, cone points, 60 
2-3 and 10 per cent.; elevator shaft and 
whiflletree bolts, 50 per cent. 

SPADES AND SHOVELS.— Prices are 
unchanged. The discount is now 15 pel- 
cent., and the list price has been reduced 
83 per do/, for Olds' goods, 82 for Gray's 
and 81 for Burns'. 

ROPE.— The reduction in sisal has not 
increased the demand, which continues of 
a hand-to-mouth nature. 'We quote as fol- 
lows : Pure manila, lie; British man 
ila, 12c; sisal, lie; lathyarn, single, 
lie. and double, ll^c; sisal bed cord, 3- 
cord, 48 feet, 65c; 60 feet, 80c; 72 feet, 
:'5c per doz. 

HARVEST TOOLS. -Trade is well 
booked up. .No change in the discounts 
is noted, they continuing at 60 and iU 
per cent. 

LAWN MOWERS.— In this line, too, 
orders for spring delivery are well in. The 
prices follow : Woodyatt, 12-in. wheels, 
£7.50 ; Star, 12-inch wheels, $5.50 ; Daisy, 
12 inch wheels, §4.00; Philadelphia, lU- 
uich wheels, $6 ; Ontario, 10-inch wheels, 
812.75. The other prices are in propor- 
tion. 

CUTLER'!. — A good business continues, 
with prices linn. 

Bl LLDING PAPER— A fair trade is 
doing at unchanged juices. We quote: Dry 
sheaUnng, grey or straw, 35c. per roll ; 
tar sheathing, grey or straw, 45c. per 
roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll ; tarred libre, 
60c. per roll. 

TINWARE AND ENAMELLED WARE. 
— A good movement continues in rnilk-can 
trimmings, but the general trade is mode- 
rate. 

STOVES AND RANGES.— There is not 

much doing, but the indications point to 
an early jobbing season in summer lines. 
RANGE BOILERS. The demand con 
tinues heavy. Prices are firm. We quote : 
18 and 30 gallon, $6; 35 gallon. 87; 10 gal- 
lon. 88; 52 gallon, 812.50; 63 'gallon, 819; 
32 gallon, 823; 100 gallon, 831, and 120 
gallon, £37. 

SCREEN DOORS.— The demand is good 
for spring delivery. We quote as follows : 
Screen door-, common, 2 or 3 panel, wal- 
nut stained, 3 in. style, 86.60; stained, 
yellow or green, 86.80; in natural colors, 
oil finish, $8.15; 1 in. style, 20c per doz. 
extra. 

CEMENT. There is not much doing as 
yet. The prices are nominal Our quota- 
tion- are as follow.-: Canadian Portland, 

82.80 to 83.20; hydraulic, 81.35 per bar- 

31 



rel. At the works the prices are §2.50 to 
82.70 per barrel. 

PI. I UBERS' BRASS GOODS. The de 
mand keeps excellent, particularlj from 
the Northwest, and as copper, zinc and 
lead continue linn, prices are steady. 

ME TAL.S. 

Stork taking having been the order of 
the da) I'm some tune the demand for 
stock shipment is light. Import business 
for prompt and forward deliver) is oi 
very satisfactory volume. Price oondi 
tions are featureless. \\ e quote 

PIG IKON. — The market continues stili, 
the demand continuing to be in excess of 

the supply. Some Scotch and English 
iron has been quoted here at figures 
varying from 821.00 to 823.50 per 
ton, though some No. I English is being 
sold at 824, when it can be had. Prices 
are as follows : 82,'i to §25 for No. 1 and 
822.50 for No. 2 at the Canadian fur 
naic- No. 2 Summerlee is quoted at §25 
on track, Toronto. 
STEEL BOILER PLATES.— We quote 

82 per LOO lb. at Pittsburg. 

TOOL STEEL.— There is a good de- 
mand at steady price-. (Quotations are: 
" B C " and "Black Diamond," 10 to 
lie; Jessop's, 'Morton's and Firth's, 
14c; Jonas & Colver's, 10 to 20c; ditto, 
"Air Hardening," 70c per lb. ; Chas. 
Leonard's, 8c to 9c; Park's "Silver," 12 
to 14c ; Park's Special," 15 to 20c. 

MILD STEEL.— The prices are steady. 
We quote 81.90 pet LOO lb. ;it Pittsburg 
and 82.75 per LOO lb. on track, Toronto. 

SPRING STEEL— The demand is nor- 
mal, but the mills are still behind their 
orders. We quote §3.50 per 100 lb. on 
track, Toronto. 

BAR IRON. — Prices are iirm as the mar- 
ket keeps active. We quote the base 
price : §2.05. Extras cut to length while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c. per 100 lb., 
1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 
20c; over 2U ft. by special agreement, 
according to length and size. 

BLACK SHEETS— The demand is quiet 
and prices are unchanged. We quote as 
follows : Common. 83.15 for 2s gauge and 
dead flat, 82. 5(1 for 26 gauge. 

CANADA PLATES. — Some movement in 
small lots is reported. (Quotations are: 

All dull, §2.90 to §3; half-polished, §2.85 
to §3. JO and all-bright, §3.75 to §3.85. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. -A fair bust 
tiess is doing at steady prices. We quote : 
Queen's Head, §4.50 for 28 gauge; Amer- 
ican, §4.40 for 24 gauge; Bell brand, 
§4.30 for 28 gauge; Cordon Crown, §4.5(1 
for 28 . gauge. 

TIN.- The demand is active. Price- are 
firm at 829 to 830 per Hid lb. 

TIN PLATES. - The demand for sp.>t 
shipment is improving and prices arc 
firmer. We quote as follows: Charcoals, 
81.75 to 85 and cokes, 84.25 to 84.50 per 
box. 

COPPER.- The demand is normal, last 

week- demand being maintained. Prices 

follow : Ingot copper, 813 and sheet Cop 

per, 822 to 823 per 100 lb. 

BRASS. This is in fair demand. The 
discount is 15 per cent. 

LEAD. The market is stronger. Prices 
are unchanged a1 83.50 per 1 00 lb. for pig 

lead and 83.75 for bar lead. 

IRON PIPE. Business keeps brisk with 
prices stiff. We quote per LOO ft.; Black 
pipe, | in., 83; \ in., 82.30 to §2.40; fin., 
82.65; h in., 82.85; J in., 83.65; bin., 
85.20; I | in., §7.35; l£-in., §8.95; 2 in., 



THE MARKETS 



Until .. .,,.• mill Mi-lnl 



|19 68; _". in . |20 to 181; 3 Lxi . 124 to 
|25; 3 10 to 132; I in . |37 .">i» to 

ZINC SPELTER. There is not mm h 
doing We quote •'> to 6c. per lb. 

ZINC SHEETS Buainesa hai im 
proved. We quote the base price ai f>>l 
Cask lots, $6 to 16.26 and pari 
ca ks, 16.26 to W 50 

SOLDER \ good demand ii noted 
I'lir.'s aif stead) al 20c. foi gruaraataed 

liulf ami half. aii<l 17 to IMe. for wipinj 

\\1IM()\N Business is in small lota. 
The price is steady ai *'■' per ton. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

MIDI'S The market is weak and there 
is a lnt'LT'' Supply. Price-, are as follows: 

\. I green, 7v , \.. 2 ureaa, 6ic.; No. 
I green, Bteers, 8c ; No. 2 groan, steei 
7.- ; cured, Bj to s iv. 

CALK Ski VS.— This is an oil season for 
ealf skins, ami business is dull. We quote 
as follows \ eal skms, (i to 11 lb. in- 
ohisive, No. I. 10c.; \". -. s > i.; 'lo., 15 to 
20 lb. inclusive, No. 1, 9c.; No. 2, 7c. ; 
deacons (dairies), 60 to 70c. each. 

SHEEPSKINS.- These find a ready sale 
in consequence of the improvement in the 
wool market. We quote B0 to 90c. 

Wool.. Fleece wool is pretty well mar- 
beted. There is a fair demand from the 

mills for pulled wool- and various urailes 
Ol foreign wools. Our prices are as fo] 

lows l awashed wool, 8 to 8-Jc; fleece 
wool, 15c.; pulled wool-, super, 15 to IGc. 
and extra. 19 to 20c. 

I U.l.nW. The market is very dull. We 
quote ■"> | to 6c. per tb.. on track, To- 
ronto, and »'>! to ii.V. out of store. 

SEEDS. 

The market for seeds is quiet and the 
condition practically unchanged. Alsike 
is offering in limited quantities at 5>(5 to 
*7.'2."> per bushel. Red clover is quoted 
from Sfi. 50 to |7. Timothy, 11,60 to |2 
per bushel, prepaid aboard at outside 
[joints. For extra choice to fancy quali- 
ties a little more may be paid, and for 
lower grades prices are below these. 

PETROLEUM. 

I'he demand continues active. \n ad 
vance <>f U-. is reported by The Queen 
City Oil Company this week. The I nion 
I'etroleum Company have not made an) 
change, their prices being as follow- . 
Lily White. Canadian, IT^c. in bbls.; Sil 
ver Light, American, L9^c in bbls.; Crys 
tal Spray, water white, American, 20 Jc. 
in bbls.; l'ennoline, best American im- 
ported . JJ( . in bbls. (n bull<, 2c. less. The 
Qi n Citj till Company quote as fol- 
lows Sarnia Prime White. 18c.; Sarnia 
Water White. 20c.; Family Saletj . 20 
in bbls. ; Pratt's Astral. 20c. in bulk. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

Iron scrap is high, the receipts being 
light, owing to the abundance ol snow W.- 
quote: Beavj copper and wire, 10c. per 
lb.; light Copper, 8 to S^c; heavy red 
In ass. ;•/,,.: heavy yellow brass, 8 to 8|c.; 
litdit brass, 5 to 5$c; lead, 2 to 2£c. 
scrap /me, 3c; iron, No. 1 wrought, >' I'' 
per net ton; No. 2 wrought, $4.50; ma- 
chinerj east Bcrap, SI5.50 to $lf>; stove 
plate, |I0; malleable and steel, $6 to 
§6.50; old rubbers, <5^c. per lb. and court- 
trv mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Turpentine is 3c, higher. 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS 

Halifax, Januerj 12, 1903 

r l~* HE nai dware tradi ha di d I" en 

li.-u\ _\ dm ing t In- last w . el Ij 

the small 1 > 1 1 in. natural at thin 
,n . . r the year keeping the whet 
ti ade -low ly mot ing I herefore, mu h 
attention is being given t.. ortin 
ol stiue gtocks and making e\ ei j thin 
i ii ..per shape for t lie rush . .i pring 1 1 ado 
w hen 1 1 comes i »n. 



Encouraging reports are coming in 

1 1 < > 1 1 1 \ .u i. hi tion ■ .t the country, and 

tin- enables the wholesalers t" 
pretty accurately how much stock of vari 
mis kind they will have to keep on hand 

and their older- ale being made up ac 

cordinglj The consensus ol opinion 
seems to l>e thai there is a good yeai 

trade ahead and preparation is being 

a.e. irdin ■ 

• # • 

Building material- are decidedh firm 
with a fair demand, which will increase 
largely in a month or two. Roofing 
material has advanced and quotations 
now are; Three-ply, $1.20 per roll; two 
ply. 95c.; tarred [eft, 11.80; tarred sheath 
ing, L5c; dry sheathing, 35c. The price ol 
wire nails remains unchanged at the re 
cent decline. There has been considei 
able talk at' times during the last yeai 
with reference to the greater manufacture 
of the latter product in Canada. In fact, 
it was thought a few months ago thai 
Sydney, the Nova-Scotian iron centre, 
would have a large wire nail factory. It 
is claimed, however, thai without a large 
increase in the duty it would be U 
to compete against the United State- 
manufacturers. This is no doubt one ot 
the points which would come up in Mr. 
Tarte's late campaign for higher protec 

tion, or in the Conservative leader's an 

nouncement in favor ol "adequate protec 
tion." The present price of wire nails, 
however, is quite satisfactory to the con 

Buniei s. 

» • • 

There is no especial change in the cord 

age situation, except that sisal has been 
reduced to lie. base to make it on a 
paritv with manila. The dealers pi 
that higher prices will prevail later in the 
season, and wholesalers who are confident 
of this will probably be large buyers at 

present quotations. There is little dolll;: 

iii cordage just now. but the spring 

mand will soon open 

* • # 

There have been no price changes '.n 

oils during the past month or so. Tin 

pentine i- now quoted at 79c; raw linseed 

oil is quoted at 75c., ill Mils.; boiled. 
78c. in both case- 5c. additional being 
charged for smaller quantities. There is 
not a heavy business in these doing at 
present. Illuminating oil remains un 
changed. Tie principal portion of the 
local supply is brought here in tank 
steamers and stored in a large tank on 
the shore of the Bedford Basin, above the 

city. A strainer arrived about ten il;u- 

with 775,000 gallons. 

a a a 
I he exports from Halifax for the 

ending the 10th, amounted to $125,391, 
of which about $60,000 is attributed to 
shipment of deals to Great Britain, where 

there is a good demand at remuneiaii e 

The apportionment is as follows; 
I.. Greal Britian, 974,661 ; I nited State 
836, S72 ; Newfoundland and St. Pierre, 
813,868. ft. i II 

.V. 



I . InaJaod 01)1] 

par.»l. iter). 

6d. El 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



m v n ' re'ii kkhh or 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Qlass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTHKAL 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, NY 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon JackM, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Wrt, 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS ATMKRS. PSI 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

»£*»>-; ^?Jri*iTf«t Variety, 

ftL A* i n ^> — s^/1 Toilet, Hand, Electric Pow«r| 

'are the best. 

Ilighfat Quality Grooming and 
8»«c- Shearing Machine* 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8EK l> FOE CATALOGUE TO 
•airnu Saaara* Mlf. Ca., Eaaaaa. E.H..CEJ 





Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINCS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 

Will elose a dooraualnst imy pressure of wind. 
Far ahead of ordinary dOOI BprlOgB, pneumatic 
orotherwi.se. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN ft SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods | 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc.. etc.. 
In all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
Jobbers throughout Canada. 

Faotory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONTl 



• a A • • 

STANDARD. 

The cost of Axes 

per million feet of 

lumber taken out 

should be the best 

Standard. Under 

this Standard the 

Crown Jkwki. is JHj ', 

the cheapest Axe fl -y 

in the market. — *^^ 

Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W.L. Haldimand, Jr., Eastern Agent, Montreal 




Hardrvare ami yfrtal 



THE MARKETS 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 
Winnipeg, January 1*2. 190.°>. 

BISINl 5S moving steadily, and 

present, it is satisfactory and all 
though the volume is not large at 
indications point to a heavy spring 

Implement nun are busy closing up 

the winter business. Nearly all the iui 

plement houses sell carriages and sleighs', 

and a~ Rno« came early this winter, the 

sale of cutters and fancy sleighs has boen 

The out look for the can iage 

. le in the -~| >ii 11 u is good. 

Quotations are as follows 

Barbed wire. loo lb 

Plain twist 

Staples 

Oiled annealed wire 10 

II 



S3 2? 
3 



6od 6 in. 



. . 3 10 



Wire Nails — 
1 in 



Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 
Cut Nai's — 

2d 1 in (| 10 

3d Kin. 1 J g in.. \ 10 

3d 1% in 3 75 

4d 1 % in 3 50 

5d 1 X in 3 5° 

6d 2 in 3 40 

8d 2'A in 3 25 

lod 3 in 3 20 

2od 4 in 3 15 

30d 4H in 3 10 

4od 5 in 3 10 

5od 5^ in 3 10 



.12 

13 

•«4 

•15 



65 

4-' 

)S 

56 

66 

7" 
91 



l'A in 4 



.$i 20 



iX 

1% 

iX 

2 
2H 

3 

354 

4 

4H 

5 

5* 

6 



2 8s 

3 25 
3 5° 
8 50 

13 00 
3 5° 
3 75 

3 9° 

4 00 
4 10 
4 00 
4 00 
4 5° 
4 5° 



Horsenails, 40 per cent. discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Sit-el, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, J4.75 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 

Spring steel 

Machinery steel 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 

I essop 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 

18 to 22 gauge 

24 guage 

2"> guage 

28 gauge 

Galvanized Iron, American, 16 gauge... 

18 and 20 gauge 

22 and 24 gauge 

26 gauge 

28 gauge 

3° gauge 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 
Apollo, io;i oz 

28 guage 

26 '• 

24 

22 gauge 

20 and 18 guage 

16 gauge 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 

26 guage 

28 •• 

Genuine Russian, per lb 

Imitation " '" 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 

26 gauge 

Tinplate, ICcharcoal, 20 x 28, box .... 

IX " 

IXX " 

Ingot tin 

Canada plate, 18x21 and 18 x 24 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, ico lb 

Broken 1 ots 

Pig lead, 100 lb 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis Jn 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 14 75 

Solder 20 

Axes, chopping % 7 50 to 12 00 

' double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 



00 
75 
50 
5° 
50 

«S 

rx) 

75 
00 
25 
11 

°7 

8 00 

8 2 S 

10 00 

12 00 

14 CO 

33 

3 25 

7 00 

7 5° 

5 00 



Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 Ji 

Round" " 82 % 

Flat " brass 80 

Round " " 75 

Coach 6; p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 50 p 0. 

Machine 50 and 5 p.c. 

Tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe % 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p c 

Flat head slove 60 and 5 p.c. 

Round head 60 and ^ p.c, 

Elevator 60 p c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

No. 12 36 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch ioJ£ 

X inch %% 

S-16 inch 5 J4 

K inch 5 Ji 

7-16 inch 5 

l A to % inch 4K 

Spades and shovels 40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools ~ . . .60 and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s.g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F. , pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 

chilled, 12 gauge 

soft , 10 gauge 

chilled, 10 gauge 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 

Chilled 

Powder, F. F. , keg 

F.F.G 



16 50 
18 00 
21 00 
23 00 
6 00 
6 50 

4 75 

5 00 
Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

" plain 75 and 2K p.c. 

pieced 

Japanned ware 37M p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 and 10 p.c. 

Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 24KC. 

Prime white American 23^0. 

Water white Canadian 23c. 

Prime white Canadian 21 'A c. 

SCRAF. 

No. 1 cast iron $14 to $15 per ton. 

No. 2 " 5 to 6 " 

Wrought iron scrap 5 " 

Copper (heavy) 7c. per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7J£c. 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. " 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c. to 2'Ac. " 

Zinc scrap ic. " 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 83 

Less than barrel lots 88 

Linseed oil, raw 71 

Boiled 74 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 27 l A 

Eldorado engine 26 y> 

Atlantic red 29J4 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 19M to 21 {4 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 56 

Neatsfoot oil 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 200 

Pure castor oil . first pressure 11 

Lubricating 10 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 550 

51 to 60 " " " 6 00 

6i to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2ji 

White lead, pure per cwt. 6 00 

No. 1 " S 75 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade andcolor, pergal.f1.30tol1.90 

36 



NO! is. 

The Western Hardware Company is a 
new claimant for business at Regina. It 
is proposed to do a general hardware 

1 1 ade 

I. is probable that English binder twine 
maj !»• offered on the Winnipeg market 
this coming season. Samples are already 
on exhibition here. 

The annual meeting of the Winnipeg 
implement and Carriage Dealers' AsSOCia- 
ti"i was held Saturday afternoon in the 
Ho:, id of Trade rooms. 

George Napier has bought the bankrupt 
stock of W. A. Irving, at Austin, and 
will put in a new and complete line of 
shell and heavy hardware. 

I. W. Martin, the vice-president of The 
Gurney Stove Company, is visiting Mont- 
real, Hamilton, and other eastern points 
in the interests of the business. 

The McLaughlin Carriage Company's 
I'm.' new building will be ready for occu- 
pation shortly. The Canada Cycle and 
Motor Co. are leasing the premises former- 
ly occupied by The M> l.aughlin Company. 



ALL RIGHT AGAIN. 

The Canada Hardware Co., Montreal, 
have everything in working order after the 
fire, and are now ready to look after all 
orders. Their travellers are all on the 
road again. 



NEW ASSISTANT MANAGER. 

E. M. Cote, for the past ±± years con- 
nected with Frothingham & Workman, 
has been appointed assistant manager for 
the Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 



ATTRACTIVE LINE OF HAMMOCKS. 

The Hoffman-Corr Co., 118 Ray street, 
Toronto, have now stocked in their ware- 
house an exceedingly attractive line of 
hammocks. This firm are making pre- 
parations to get a considerable slice of the 
hammock trade this year, so it would be 
well for hardwaremen to correspond with 
them before placing their orders for this 
line. 

A NEW AGENCY. 

Decatur, Bull & Co., Montreal, have 
been appointed sole agents in Canada for 
the Hay-Budden Manufacturing Com- 
pany's anvils. This New York company 
turns out more anvils than any other 
makers in the world, and although it is the 
.first time they have had an agency in 
Canada, their anvils are as well known 
here as in the United States. Decatur, 
Bull & Co. have experienced an immense 
demand for them, and they have a full line 
of vises to accompany the anvils. 



The People's Almanac of 1903, a supple- 
ment to The Gazette, Montreal, appeared 
a few days ago. The cover is made 
quite attractive by a cut of the Canadian 
flag printed in two colors. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PROFITS FOR EMPLOYES. 

I\ ., double <n< ul. ii . one to the took 
holders and the othei to the offii 
llM ,l employee, I"he I oited Stat* 

Bti el Corporation annoui ntention 

t,, inaugurate a Byeteni wherebj J 1 "' 

I, blesl workman on its "'I'- may, a h>i 

desires, become b permanent Btookholdoi 
bare in the profits ol the Corpora 
t ton 

The aoheme is the result <>f months uf 

preparal bj the Enani e committee ol 

the Corporation, and the circulars are 
uigned hj G. W. Perkins, chairman. The 
plan is Baid i" have originated with Mr. 
Perkins. 

The plan inviting officers and empl 
to participate is divided into two parts. 
Part one prescribes that from the 
,,,._.- ,,i the Corporation during the yeai 

1902 there will have 1 a se1 

leaet 12,000,000, and as much more 
needed foi tin- purchase oi a1 least - 
Bhares of preferred Btock, which will be 
offered to employes of the Corporation 
■ hi, l . onstil in nt companies. 

\t preaenl tin- Corporation ami sub 
sidiary companies employ 168,000 men, 
whom it i< proposed to divide into 

, ranging from their receiving $20, 
000 a year <>r over down t<> men earning 
5800 yearly or less. The preferred Btock 
will be offered to any employe during 
January at ss-j.r>ii per share. (Its closing 
price on December ■">! was J85.87J. i Eni 
ployes fun subscribe for an amount <>t 
Btock not exceeding the sum represented 
bj a certain percentage oi their salaries. 

WHAT CONS! mi ES PROFITS. 

The question of what constitutes pro- 
fits i- t.. be determined entirely by the 
finance committee, which, it is stal ■•!. 
will have no interest in the profitrshar- 

ing plan. Ii 880, ,000 is earned in the 

ooming year, $800, will be Bel aside, 

pne-half to be distributed in cash quar- 
terly, the other half to he reserved until 
tli.- .-ml of the year, ami invested in prefer- 
red st,»,k. the' stock thus purchased to 
In- divided one half to employes entitled 
thereto, the other half to remain with 
the treasurer of the Corporation. Eacli 
shareholder is to receive a certificate for 
his interest containing these provisions : 

First— If he remains continuously in the 
service of the Corporation or of one or 
another of its subsidiary companies for 
five years, the atock -hall be delivered to 
him. and he may do as he likes with it 

Second— If he dies or becomes totally 
and permanently disabled while in the 
employ of the Corporation or of one or 
another of its subsidiary companies, the 
-toiU will he delivered to his estate or 
to him. 

Third— He can draw the dividends de- 
clared on the stock while it is held for 
hi- account, and he remains in the em- 
ploy of tin- Corporation or of one or an- 
other of it< subsidiary companies. 

MUSI WORK FOR FIVK YEARS. 

Fourth— That if. without previous con 
Beni voluntarily, he -hall have quitted 'he 
service of the Corporation or of it 

sidiary companies, he shall forfeit ill 
right to this stock, and in such case it 
will he held in a fund, which, at the en I 
of five years, will be divided anions such 
employes a- -hall have complied with the 
conditions. 

Thus 25 per cent, of all the money -et 
aside in this profit-sharing plan will be 



held for five years, and will he given t'> 

BUCH Onlj a at the end of that period 

shall l»- mi the employ oi tin- Corpora 
ti. .n ..I oi .a anothei of it ub > 

diary compuuie- from and ue. January 

I. 1903 

lli -I, officials of th.- Steel Coi poration 
decline. I to daj t" di . n the repi 
approaching retirement of Pre idanl 
Schv 



BUSINESS CHANGES 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED LND 
DISSOIA I D 

SI 0NEH01 SE & WILSON, agricul 
tural implement Ottawa. 

havi di olved pari oei hip. The 
business will b< tinued by \\ •■. Nil 

-on. 

Nesbitt & Story, agricultural implement 
agents, Peterboro'-, Ont., have dissolved 

partner-hip. 

Mann <V Ross, general merchants, ol 
Ototoks, have dissolved partnership, Gil- 
bert Ross retiring. 




Mr C. B. soNTt'M. Christiana, Norway, 

Oommeroial \ Canadian Government I 

Denmark and Finland, Norwegian Commie 
rioner at the World b Pair, Chicago, n..in irhom an inters* 
ing tett ■ > another column 



Goulet Ii- Montreal, Que., have dis- 
Bolved partnership. A new partnership 
has been re 

Hemphill & I.athem. blacksmiths and 
carriage builders, Maple Ridge, Que., have 
i tnership. 

Whitman >v Co., general merchants,' of 
Emerson, Han., have dissolved partner- 
ship. .1. W. Armstrong and II. H. Hall 
have retired. 

DIFFII I 1 TIES \ — i ■ . x m i \ is. COW 
PROMS! - 

Sheridan & Co., general merchant 
I'- -ton. Out., have assigned in trust. 

IV I general merchant (late), las 

ned to 1> W \dam. Prince Arthur. 

I h. sheriff is in possession of the stock 

of T. H. Logan, general merchant, ol 

Carberry, Man. 

Holstein Bros., general merchants, of 
Vermachar and axden, Ont., have assign- 
ed to Richard Tew. 



1 1 1 . 

I'uai t , Ont., Iia' • 

Si ..it. Ilamilt. .n \ meet n 

I .. ■ I - 1 on tin- l-th 

SALBS m mm \M' PI NDING 

I h. . i| I. ihn Dunnell, bl 

nil I Ii. Si Mai J , Out. I ad- ■ I 
ale 

E. Heni i merchant, Waskada, 

Man . I- ad foi 

al. 

I- I P. ai ii _-.-n.-i al mei chant . > 

i int ha old hi to D. J 
Downey. 

CahiU I' era! merchant 

I al.. n. lint . bai e -old out tn I i a II 

I .ama ' 

I le Ihn dw ai .- \l anufacl m .-i \ 
importers, oi London, I 
ha\ e told out to I I. P.i odei 

i. Grondin, general merchant and hotel 
ki ep.i . of Notre Dame dn Poi te 

In- Iiii-ii ale. 

'flu- Smith A i I I. unite. I. 

hardware merchant* and implement 
agents, Regina, N.W.T., have old 
implement business to I; l •; \l i. -i ; 

o 1 1 ._• 1 1 . 

\i w FIRMS \\D CH w.i - 

I.. Rousgeau A. Frere, machinists, of 
Quebec, have registered. 

The Federal Oil Company, of Montreal, 
is Beeking incorporation. 

\ McFarlane & Co., metal brokers, 
etc., Montreal, have registered. 

The Londonderry Iron and Mining l 
Limited. Montreal, has registered. 

Thuron & Lalonde, general merchant . 
of The Brook, Ont., are removing; to 

Hammond. 

The Simplex Railway Appliance Coin 
panv. of Canada, Limited, has been in 

i orpoi a ted. 

Hastings & Kiltie ha 
ings iV McDowell, general merchanl 
Sintaluta, M.W.T. 

The Hull Co., Limited, of Findlay, 
Man . are applying for incorporation as 

al merchant-. 

FIR] - 

Mills, Stanley & Co • general merchant-. 
Hamilton. Ont., have 1 n burned out . 

insure. I. 

DEATHS. 

E. Bell, hardware merchant, of 

Toronto, i- dead. 
\ultu- M McLean, general merchant, of 

BathuXSt, VS.. i- dead. 



TRADE CHAT. 



John Young, of Wingham, Ont., lias 
removed to London, tint., to accept a 
position in a wholesale hardware house. 

The firm o\ Greenleaf & Son, oi Belle- 
ville, dealer- in sporting goods, bicycles, 
typewriters, electrical goods, etc., are put - 

tint; in a line of shelf hardware. 

The paragraph which recentl) appeared 
in Hardware \\i> Mbtai to the effecl 
that The Yukon Hardware Co., Limited, 
had purchased the stock ol McLennan, 
McFeel. & Co., Limited, al Dawson and 
Vancouver, was onl. partlj correct. It 
was the -lock in Dawson only which the 
former linn had purchased. 



Hiinitriire ••ml Mcttil 




GAS V. ELECTRICITY. 

THERE i- n. i doubt whatever that Lhe 
extension of electric lighting has 

|iiit the gas com] anies on their 
mettle, and that consumers are now get 
bettei as well as cheaper ua^ than 
would have been the case had no such 
competitor as electricity appeared upon 
the scene, says Ironmonger. The almost 
feverish haste with which the gas com 
pain in my neighborhood recently substi 
tuted incandescent Gttings ami mantles 
for tlu' old fashioned flat flame burners, 
ami more recently still supplied brand 
new lanterns with handsome porcelain re- 
flectors throughout the district, was ad- 
mittedly done t<> keep out tin- electric 
light, and not from any motive of phil- 
anthropy or benevolent desire to dispel 
tin' obscurity which formerly prevailed. 

where I live a few electric arc 
lamps have been set up. ami the effect at 
ni<_rlit is decidedly pleasing, hut. when 
after a certain hour the arc lamps arc 
switched off ami the lower glow lamps are 
switched on. the oontrast is painfully 
striking. Incandescent electric lamps for 
street lighting are, in truth, a dismal fail 
mi', ami vastly inferior to incandescent 
-■'-■ 

For indoor lighting, however, electric 
glow-lamps offer the advant'ages of clean- 
liness, convenience, and freedom from air 
vitiation, and where cost is no object 
this method <>f illumination undoubtedly 
-con'-. Hut for tradesmen who find i f 
.Hv to practise economy, electric 
lighting i~ rather too expensive. This 
view <>f the matter is cleverly set forth 
in a pamphlet issued by certain provin- 
cial gas companies, in which the experi 
iii. ci various municipalities with gas 

and electric lighting ale succinctly liar 

rated, tie- most striking testimony in 
favor of gas being that given by the 
Liverpool city council, who. after making 
their own electricity for some time for 
street lighting, ha I at the con- 

clusion that gas i- quite as effective, 
while much less than electricity. 

Another serious drawback attending the 
substitution of electricity foi ua^ in pub- 
lic buildings, especially churches and chap 
els, i- the unpleasant down draughts which 
frequently result owing to the glow lamps 
L r ivim_r off less heat than the gaslights, 
and being insufficient to counteract the 
flow of cold air on to the heads of th ■ 
audience The use of hot water pipes 
placed J" to 25 feet above the floor is 



-aid to cure the e\il, but as it is COStly 

as well as troublesome to instal pipes in 
such a position in existing buildings, the 
tendency seems to be to revert to a par 
tial use of gas in electrically - lighted 
buildings so as to check the down- 
draught nuisance. If judiciously intro 
duced the two kinds of light go very well 
together, while decoratively the dual sys 
tem can l>e harmonized without difficulty. 



JOURNEYMEN PLUMBERS' 
OFFICERS. 

The following officers have been elected 

by the Toronto Local Union No. 46, of 
the Plumbers, Steam and Gasfitters' at the 
regular meeting held on Wednesday night: 
President. •). A. Dougan; vice-president, 
\Y. .1. Storey; recording-secretary, W. N. 
Eiraybon; financial secretary, P. McCann; 
treasurer, F. Maxwell; inside guard, C. 
Horn: outside guard, J. H. Brown; trus- 
tees. I). .McMillan. T. MEcCann and F. 
Jenkins. Sick Committee. — F. Butters, J. 
S Grassick, I). Cruickshanks and A.Gill. 
Finance Committee. — A. Lowery, J. 
Priestly and C. Randell. Delegates to 
Building Trades' Council. — J. A. Dougan, 
•1. Richards and W. N. Braybbn. Execu- 
tive Committee. — .). A. Dougan, W. N. 
Braybon, -J. Richards, P. McCann and 
F. Maxwell. 

THE COST OF GAS MANTLES. 

There is a [nice below which a reliable 
Lias mantle cannot be produced. A writer 
in The Scientific American, who is evi- 
dently versed in the practical manufac- 
ture of mantles, contributes to a contem- 
porary the information that the chem- 
icals in 1,000 mantles cost $17.50; the 
fabric prepared, $13; the shaping, §11; 
coating, $3.75; boxing, labelling and pack- 
ing, $3.75; profit and selling expenses, 8(>; 
total, SCO. 

TORONTO PLUMBERS " AT HOME " 

The Toronto journeymen plumbers will 
hold their annual " At Home" in the 
Temple Building on Friday evening, Janu- 
ary -''.ti. President -I. A. Drogan is chair- 
man, and W. A. I'ravdon, secretary of 
the committee who have the affair in 
hand, bo ja, good time is assured, as has 
been the case with the social affairs of 
this union in the past. Tickets will be 
$2 : single ticket -. s| .25, 

38 



BUILDING NOTES. 

THE Imperial Hank has decided to 
erect an office building at the cor- 
ner of St. James and Mctiill 
Streets, Montreal. 

Thomas Welch and J. G. Weir are ercot- 
ing new houses in Otojinbce, Out. 

'The farmers about Hartney. Man., will 
erect a TOjWK) bushel elevator near the 
Canadian Northern track early next 
summer. 

There were over lit dwellings and many 
line business blocks erected in Louisburg, 
C.B., last year, and this year it is ex- 
pected to be equally as busy. 

J. H. Eaton has the contract for build- 
ing a 200 x 45 ft. factory for The Domin- 
ion Wrought Iron Wheel Co., of Orillia, 
Ont. 'The building will be metal-clad. 

It is reported in Winnipeg that the 
Canadian Northern Railway have pur- 
i hased an entire block in that city on 
which to erect a large hotel and station. 

The building outlook for the season of 
1903 is the rosiest in the history of Win- 
nipeg, says The 'Telegram, of that city, 
and from present indications should be 
about 50 per cent, ahead of last year. At 
least two new bank buildings will be 
constructed, and there are several ware- 
houses, either under construction or to be 
erected. A big Chicago firm is going to 
build residences here in the coming spring 
on a very extensive scale. It is its inten- 
tion to put up at least 100 good residen 
ces. 'This will be a boon, and will great 
ly help the people who are clamoring for 
homes. 

MONTREAL. 

'The property at the southwest corner of 
St. .lames and McGill streets, formerly 
occupied by Thomas May & Co., and 
which was destroyed by fire in January, 
1901, has been purchased by the Imperial 
Hank, and they will build in the spring 
The bank will occupy the ground floor 
and the rest of the building will be used 
as offices. Taylor & Gordon will be the 
architects. 

TORONTO PLUMBERS STILL BUSY. 

While there are not many important 
contracts being secured just now there is 
no lack of work for Toronto plumbing 
houses, as there are many contracts still 
uncompleted and much repair work 
caused by the steady cold weather of the 
last day or two. A big rush of work is 
looked for in the spring. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




Are you after it ? 

There are going to be some surprises in the paint 
business in 1903. 

The biggest surprise will be the enormous sales for 
those who go after it. 

Get after it with a paint that has a record. Cheap 
paint won't help you. 

RAMSAY PAINTS will get you a slice of this big 
business as it has done for hosts of others. 

Want to try ? 



A RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



PAINT 
MAKERS 



tano 



THE PERFECT WALL TINT. 

We have nothing old fashioned to offer in this line 

Muralo is the latest, up-to-date, only perfect cold water 
wall tint in the world. 

Muralo is entirely different from any other so-called 
cold water wall tint. 

Muralo is beautiful, sanitary, easy to work, finely milled, 
well advertised, and well backed up. 

Muralo sells. 

AGENTS : 

A. RAMSAY & SON, .... MONTREAL 
THE J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO., Limited, - WINNIPEG 
McLENNAN, McFEELY & CO., - - • VANCOUVER 

Makers 
THE MURALO COMPANY, New Brighton, Borough of Richmond. Hen Y..rk 



Copper Co., Limited 



Booth 

Cuts 

Copper and Brass 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



SHEETS-TUBES -RODS 



to any size. 

FULL STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND. 
PROMPT SHIPMENTS. 



The BOOTH COPPER CO., Limited 



119-123 Queen St. East, 

TORONTO 



Manila Rope 




Lathyarn 


Sisal Rope 




Shingleyarn 


Jute Rope 




Bale Rope 


Russian Rope 




Lariat Rope 


Marline 




Hemp Packing 


Houseline 




Italian Packing 


Hambroline 




Jute Packing 


Clotheslines 




Drilling Cables 


Tarred Hemp 


Rope 


Spunyarn 


White Hemp Rope 


Pulp Cord 


Bolt Rope 




Lobster Marlln 


Hide Rope 




Paper Cord 


Halyards 




Cheese Cord 


Deep Sealine 




Hay Rope 


Ratline 




Fish Cord 


Plow Lines 




Sand Lines 


RED 1 HREAD' 1 lansmission Hop 


E from the finest qualit- Manila 


liemp obtainable, laid 


in (allow. 




SUMERS CI 


JRDA 


GE COMPANY, 

a>a Linn tod 



Western Ontario Representative 

wm. b. stew»rt. MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel. 94 27 Front St.. Wo»t. Toronto. 



39 



//ill./:. ,11, .in,,' Mttul 



HEATING AM) PLUMBING 



THE GUELPH ACETYLENE SYSTEM. 

r r*> III Guelph Acetylene Gas-Generator 
Company, Limited, Guelph, Out, 
are introducing their apparatus on 
the British market a^ well a> throughout 
Canada. The apparatus is made <>n the 
oarbide-to-watei system., The machine 
its of a gas-holder for storing the 
and the generator, the upper part of 
the latter containing two cylinders, divid- 
ed into compartments, in which the - ar 
hide i- placed. The loweing of the gas- 
holder a^ consumption proceeds auto 
inatically empties the compartments, one 
at a time, and allow- the carbide to fall 
into the water on to a wire gran- \- 
the gas comes <>ii it bubbles up through 
the body of cold water, which cools it at 
once and removes any impurities which 
might otherwise pass oil' with it. Be- 
tween the generator and the holder the 
gas passes through a condenser. When all 
the compartments of the cylinder are 
empty it may l>e taken out for re filling, 
use being made in the meantime of the 
other, so that by alternately filling these 
receptacles a constant supply of gas oan 
he had. The regulation of the supffly of 
carbide prevents any more gas going in- 
to the holder than it is arranged to hold. 
A dial outside the generator indicates 
which holder is in use. The residue re- 



sulting from the decomposed carbide 
-inks to the bottom of the generator- 
tank and is drawn off through a grate, 
there being no escape of gas while this is 

being done The advantages clai I for 

the system are the automatic regulated 
supply of carbide. the impossibility of 
after or excessive generation, complete e* 
traction of gas from the carbide, purity 
i'I gas, absence of smell, and simplicity of 
mechanism. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 

TORONTO. 

I). Schwalm, for pair dwellings at I7(> 
17s Ossington avenue, to cost &4,000. 

Win. Mall, two dwellings near Dundas 
street on Boustead avenue, to cost $1,100; 
V7. Hall & Son. builders 

The Aiine Loan and Savings Co., six 
dwellings, 191-201 Shaw street, to cost 

SlO.SOO; .lames Claxton, builder. 

Metropolitan Hank, for |1,500 altera 

lions to bank premises, corner Bathurst 
and College streets ; Darling & Pearson, 
architects 

The York. Loan and Savings Co., for 
two dwellings at '250 2fi(i Uoneesvnlles 
avenue, fco cost 84,500 each ; R. H. San- 
derson, architect. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

\\ Plaxton, of ('. & W. IMaxton, 
plumbers, Winnipeg, is dead. 

The trouble between Lemmon, Claxton 
,\ Lawrenson and the Plumbers and 

Sheet Metal Workers' [ nions at King 
Ston, Out., lias been amicably settled. 

Frank McKnight leaves this week for 
\ew \oik. where lie will take up studies 
in steam-heating, Mr. McKnight is one 
of Owen Sound's enterprising young men. 
who is taking a thorough technical coui>e 
at his occupation as a plumber and 

sleatnlitter. 

Tenders are to be asked for electric- 
wiring the Hamilton, Out., city hall. They 
will be subject to plans prepared by the 
citj engineer and to the approval of the 
fire underwriters' inspector. All tenderers 
to employ union labor. 



The Canadian Pacific Railway have in- 
augurated a new department on the At- 
lantic Division and have appointed W. 
W. Husband as agricultural agent, who 
will assist in every way the agricultural 
and industrial development of the coun- 
tiy. Dairying and cattle raising, by the 
latest methods, will be encouraged, as 
also will potato and apple growing. 




DEAL',: Fencing 



Woven 
Wire 

COMPLETE IN THE ROLL, READY TO ERECT. 

A GOOD SELLER 



because the use of No. <j Hard Spring Wire for 
both Stays and Horizontals makes it the 

Strongest and Best. 

WRITE FOB SAMPLE AND PRICES. 
THE 

IMiegof-Banwell Fence Co,, 



WINDSOR, ONT 



Limited. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN ? 

for Folder No. 1 1. 

Pullman Sash Bal. Co. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.aA. 



NAILS 

Right Prices 

QuicK Shipments 

Quality Guaranteed 

Also 

STAPLES 

■Write, Telegraph or Telephone 

Pag'e "Wire Fence Co. 

Limited 
WalKorville, Ontario 

ASSISTANT WANTED. 

Bright young man with thorough knowledge 
of the hardware trade, and full of bright up-to-date 
ideas to assist in the editorial department of Hard- 
ware and Metal. State experience and present 
salary. Address Editor Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto or Montreal. 



FOtt SALE. 



FOR SALE— OLD ESTABLISHED HARD- 
ware Business in rapidly growing town of 
Collingwood. It has good connection and increas- 
ing trade ; owner retiring. Apply to J. Henderson, 
Collingwood. (5) 

DO YOU WANT A SET OF TINNER'S OR 
Plumber's tools at a bargain? If so write 
Byers, Giegerich, Green O., Limited. Kaslo, B.C. 
(5) 

HARDWARE— GOOD PAYING BUSINESS, 
excellent location, sales mostly cash, stock 
$4,000, all first-class. Owner going into manu- 
facturing. Will sell quick at price on dollar. 
Address care London Fence Machine Co., London, 
Canada. (tf) 

A 1 OPENING. BEST AND MOST SUCCESS- 
ful hardware business in first-class Weste n 
Ontario town, 2,500 population. Agricultural dis- 
trict equal to any in Canada. Good live stock, 
value over $4,000. Proprietor going into manu- 
facturing. Splendid opportunity, must sell quick. 
Address "Hardware,'' care London Fence Ma hine 
Company, London, Ontario. (tf) 



OUR NEW CATALOGUE IS READY FOR 
DISTRIBUTION AND IT IS FULL OF IN- 
FORMATION VALUABLE FOR THE DEALER. 
SHALL WE NOT MAIL YOU A COPY? 



YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT OUR ARMS. YOUR JOBBER HAS THEM. 



J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., P0 2 , B 7 OX Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 



Limited, ware Merchants, Utt3W3, OfR. 



Barb Wire, 
Hay Wire, 
Cut Nails, 
Wire Nails, 
Cordage, 
Glass, 
Etc. 



The Only 
Exclusive 
Wholesale 
Hardware Firm 
Between 
Montreal 

and 
Toronto. 



Tarred and 

Dry Sheathing, 
Tarred Felt, 
Rosin, Pitch, 
Chopping Axes, 
Broad Axes, 
Cross Cut Saws, 

Etc. 



A complete stock of Lumbermen's and Builders' Hardware always on hand. A Trial Solicited. 
PEICES DRIG-IEIT. ASK FOE PRICES. 



Use Syracus 



abbitt Mete.1 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, 8aw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Ci 'Tin 
and 811k Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire. Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter. 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc., always In stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Gold Street, New York. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



ATKINS 22! 



IIGH-GRADE, O /I 1A/ C7 are superior to all others IN MATERIAL, 1EM 

[OSS-CUT aJ/1 ¥¥ a3 PER,' WORKMANSHIP, FINISH and CUTTING QUALITIES. 
OUR VICTOR, TUTTLE TOOTH AND SEGMENT GROUND SAWS ARE THE FAVORITES IN THE CAMPS 



£ 



^^^^^Xfl^fl^r ;; ;: -> , 



m 



THE VXTQR 
LANCE «^3 TOOTH 



E.CJUKINSVCO INDIANAPOLIS 



j 



E. C. ATKINS & Co., 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. 



Leading Manufacturers of HIGH-GRADE, CROSS CUT, HAND, BAND, 
CIRCULAR, HACK, BACK, WOOD and SMALL SAWS op ail kinds. 



Write for Catalogue and Prices" 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York : 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. Galvanized Plain Wire 

Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Morse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 



Hat dtvare and Metal 



ADVERTISING FRAUDS. 



By J. L. Troy. 



THE question of publicity, "advertis- 
is one of prime importance to 

the progressive business man. How- 
to get the best results for the least money 
is a matter which interests every adver- 
tiser who bas a message i<> convey to the 
public. Ever) up-to-date business man 
concedes thai advertising well and judi- 
ciously placed in mediums of recognized 
worth and circulation pays. The selection 
ol the proper medium requires careful con- 
sideration, as many unworthy fake 
schemes are constantly being foisted on 
the ad\ ertising public. There are more fak- 
ers in the advertising line possibly ''\. '" 
an] OttfBl Calling, due principally to the 
fact that the average business man is not 
so well posted in the matter of advertis- 
ing as he miffht be. The average busi- 
aess man is altogether too willing to give 
ear to the plausible story of the slick 
advertising faker, who has, according to 
his own story, the best thing in the ad- 
vertising line on earth to offer. 

Some of the advertising fakes now work- 
ed successfully, particularly on this side 
of the line, are old. Notwithstanding all 
that, there are merchants thoughtless en- 
ough to try them and pay largely for the 
privilege of trying. Those are the mer- 
chants who will tell you that they spent 
two or three thousand dollars, as the case 
may be, last year in advertising, and 
that results were not satisfactory. All 
the money wasted in fake schemes is char- 
ged to advertising. The writer knows one 
firm that spent twelve hundred dollars 
last year, out of a total appropriation of 
two thousand, in fake advertising schemes 
purely and simply. This firm complained 
they did not get adequate returns for the 
amount spent in advertising a nd condemn 
advertising in unmeasured terms. 

The reputable daily or weekly news- 
paper of known circulation for the retail- 
er is unquestionably the best he can em- 
ploy to reach the buying public. For the 
manufacturci . wholesaler or jobber, a 
reliable trade paper should be employed 
to carry his announcements to the mer- 
chant. We advise the advertising public 
to give a wide berth to the oily-tongued 
advertising faker. He arrives in our 
midst wearing a suave debonnair air, 
knows it all, is very smooth and plausible 
and usually catches the business man nap- 
ping, and, of course, works him for an 
order. 

He comes sometimes as the self-styled 
agent of some respectable fraternal so 



ciety from whom lie gets permission to 
eei ii]i a programme for a concert or en- 
tertainment. His modus operandi is this: 
He secures permission from the secretary 
or some person else in authority in some 
fraternal or other societj organization or 
trade union to get op a programme, he 
agreeing to furnish the programme free of 
charge. He then goes among the business 
people soliciting advertisements from 
them in the name of the organization 
which gave him the privilege, levying 
blackmail purely and simply until he 
reaps a rich harvest. 

Then, again, there is the faker who gets 
up hotel advertising, such as hotel regis- 
ters, combination counter stands for 
hotels, blotters for the writing table, 
clocks set in a frame containing adver- 
tisements, writing desks with ads. in the 
back, etc. The gentleman who gets up 
this form of advertising, first gets the 
assent of the hotel proprietor to his pro- 
position to furnish him with a register, 
or some other requisite free of charge. The 
next step is to secure the names of those 
from whom the hotelman buys his sup- 
plies. 

After the names have been secured the 
slick advertising faker goes around and 
solicits advertisements in the name of the 
hotel proprietor. Another case of black- 
mail, but he yets the advertisements and 
afterwards the cash. 

Another is the so-called industrial num- 
ber for some paper. The ad. faker in this 
case goes to some publisher of a weekly or 
daily and agrees to pay a certain sum of 
money for a certain number of copies of 
the paper to be published on a certain 
day, and distributed with the regular 
edition. That done, lie proceeds to write 
a short sketch about the town, publishing 
a cut of the city hall and chief magis- 
trate, perhaps. The rest of the number is 
made up of write ups of the business 
houses for which he changes so much per 
line. He will tell an advertiser that the 
number of copies printed will be so much, 
when, as a matter of fact, not over one- 
fourth the number promised will be print- 
ed — often even less than that. 

The fellow with the calendar fans, no- 
tions, and countless other things, all 
more or less worthless fakes appears on 
the scene quite frequently and gets his 
share of what is going. 

The merchant who pays his money for 
such a class of advertising as we have 
just mentioned does not get value for his 
money. He is the man who will tell you 



that he spent so much money last year in 
advertising and it did not pay him, but 
when you come to analyze his advertis- 
ing account you will find that the greater 
portion he wasted in some fake proposi- 
tion or scheme. 

A special Christmas publication recently 
secured nearly 200 advertisers. On the 
promise of 15,000 circulation several men 
used it who do not advertise- in any of 
their local papers. As a matter of fact, 
only 200 copies were printed. They were 
used by the faker to leave with each ad- 
vertiser when he collected his account. 

Profitable advertising is not an acci- 
dent ; it is the result of careful thought 
along common-sense lines. If the adver- 
tiser is new in the business it would be 
well for him, perhaps, to consult with 
some of his friends in business who have 
advertised extensively and made a success 
of it. If he "has no such friend in busi- 
ness with whom lie can consult, then he 
should take into his confidence a man 
experienced in advertising, a capable hon- 
est man connected with some well-known 
honest publication, listen to his advice, 
and be guided by what he tells him. Al- 
ways remember one thing — don't listen to 
the unknown advertising faker who is here 
to-day and away to-morrow. He is not 
out for your good, he is after your dol- 
lars. 

Advertising well and judiciously placed 
in respectable newspapers and trade jour- 
nals of known circulation pays, and pays 
well, but your money is absolutely 
thrown away when invested in fake ad- 
vertising schemes. 



"AFTER MANY DAYS." 

The office Specialty Company, manufac- 
turers of desks and office furniture, had 
an advertisement in the spring trade 
number of " Hardware and Metal" two 
years ago. 

The other day they received an order 
through that advertisement from the 
Anglo-Egyptian Bank, Gibraltar, for a 
complete outfit of roll-top desks, chains 
and other office furniture for that bank. 
This paragraph will probably be the first 
intimation that The Office Specialty Co. 
have that they owe this order to "Hard- 
ware and Metal." Unfortunately, no 
matter how good his intentions are, the 
average writer, who makes inquiry or 
sends an order in response to an adver- 
tisement, seldom gives the source from 
which he got his information. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




HARNESS PREPARATIONS. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 

HARNESS DRESSING 



iv. ognUed m 

•' THE STANDARD 
ProdUCM 11 brilliant Jet 

black kIo>» which ■ ill Dol 
peel or smut and to which 
dirt will not stick. 



f f>t»K M«. tCj|j 



^/?NESS SON ? " 




Harness Soap 

liirlvaled for 
ripening and soft- 
i- in ml: Barneaa 

I'nt up in cakes, 
pans, boxes and 
tubs. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil. 



Preserves and softens the leather, 
thus adding Ufa. 

The highest quality of oil on the 
market. 



BarSess 

OIL 

OLACK1NO, 

'mPBANK MULCT* 
EW YORK- 



.lutes ami IHitch 



HORSE BLANKETS 

HORSE COVERS l^L* ™ 

SWEAT PADS %£*" Ui '" "■ 

Enquiries Solicited. 
HENRY F. FALKINER 
60 George Street - TORONTO 




GET THE ORIGINAL. 
We lead, other- imitate. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., 



Manufacturers. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



LAMB FENCE 



HARD WIRE. 
CROSS BAR. 



The H. R. LAMB FENCE CO., Limited, London, Ont. 



in tin- paper cost 2 rent- pet 

Insertion, payable strict!} cub with order. 

Many largi val- have 

brought about through advertisemi 
20 or 80 words. Uleriucan beset tired, artl- 
. ii - -ni. i and exchanged, al small expen- 
m'l forget to mpa or 

pottal order when sending In copy . when 
replies come in our care > cents additional 
iiiu-t be Included for forwarding same 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 

Montreal and Toronto 



Steward & Romaine Mfjj. Co. 

EXPANSION and 
TOGGLE BOLTS 

kuuls of iii.it.-n.il to . 

Stone oi ' tin. nt 
124 Norlh Slxlh St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

GALVANIZING 



our plan! Is modern 

Prices O.K. < ah. r branchei 
WINDMILLS, PUMPS, 
FOUNDRY WORK ETC 



TANKS, 
ETC. 

Ontario Wind Engine A Pump Co , Limited. 

BOS Atlantic Ave., Toronto. 



Fire Clay 
and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement. 



STOVE BRICK 

aii kimis ni i'in- t laj prodoeti made to 
..r.iir from patterns. Write iv.r Price List. 

jones bros., eR,c »;;; u .;,™: <"" 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NQN -EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20Guagre. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Cun Made. 




THE CELEBRATED 

NATIONAL CUTLERV CO. SHEARS 

Acknowledged the best and fully warranted. 
Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



Tailors' Shears 
Trimmers 
Ladies' Scissors 
Barbers' Shears 
Tinners' Snips 



DECATUR, BULL & CO., KnSu. 




£JMdn.(4 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER OIBB, 13 St. John St.. MO N TREAL. 
73 YEARS. ESTABLISHED 1823. 73 YEARS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NEW ONTARIO IRON RANGE. 

r pilK new iron range in Ontario, north 
of Sudbury, discovered by State 
Railroad Commissioner Chas. S. 
Dehorn, of Sault Ste. Mario. Mich., was 
privately financed long ago, and will be 
privately developed. An offer, it is on 
derstood, of $2,000,000 has been tendered 
and refused. 

The range is located in what is known 
as the Moose Mountains, and iron forma- 
tion extends over .'W or 40 miles. The 
principal discoveries <>i apparent greatest 
value have been made in that portion of 
the ran-r along the west branch of the 
Vermilion ttiver, prolonging northwest 
and southeast into the township of Hut- 
ton, in the Nipissing District. Out of this 
township to the northwest, the range 
runs into an unsurveyed territory of the 
Ugoxna District. 

The company whose organization was 
announced in The New York Commercial, 
control live miles of land along the form- 
ation, and cover the largest discoveries 
made up to the present time. 

The range has been visited and inspect- 
ed by many of the leading ore experts of 
the United States and Canada, and at 
least one from England, Germany, and 
Sweden. 

A most thorough and complete mag- 
netic and geological survey of the coun- 
try controlled by the two companies has 
been made by Professor Kenneth Leith, of 
the University of Wisconsin, and also a 
member of the United States Geological 
Survey. It was Professor Leith who 
made the survey and maps of the Mesaba 
and Vermilion ranges for the Govern' 
nient, spending five years on the Vermil- 
ion range alone in carrying on this work. 

Consequently, it is acknowledged he 
knows more than anyone else of the Ver- 
milion range, and is not likely to be mis- 
taken when he says that the Moose Moun- 
tain range is the same as the Vermilion 
in age and formation, except the ore of 
one is hematite and the other a magne- 
tite. 

The Moos,. Mountain range, according to 
the statements of Professor Leith, is more 
regular and strongly defined on the suiface. 
II estimates there is in sight at present 
on the properties of the companies, with- 
out practically any exploration or de- 
velopment, at least 10,000,000 tons of 0U 
per cent, ore, providing the ore prolongs 
to a depth of 2.">U feet. At a depth of 
1,000 feet, the ore in sight would be more 

than In, i, i tons. Ore of the same 

character is now being mined at a depth 
of 2,000 ' 

Of ore of a lower grade, but yet valu- 
able, Professor Leith estimates that there 
are 140,000,000 tons in sight, at a depth 
of 250 feet. To carry the ligures to a 
depth of 1,000 feet is to stagger the mi 
agination. 



II. I). Fisher, discoverer of the Menom- 
inee ranee. 3ays this latest discovery is 
the greatest of which he has ever known, 
excepting the Mesaba range. 

The work accomplished np to the pres- 
ent time has consisted in locating and 
securing titles to the properties, road 
building, camp bu-lding, diamond drill- 
ing, trenching, cross-cutting, and test pit- 
ting. In this work there has been expen- 
ded over §100,000. 

It is expected a railroad will be built 
into the property by the middle of next 
season, and already applications have 
been made for the sale or lease of iron 
properties and for town sites. 



REGINA STORE CHANGES HANDS. 

The propertj and business owned and 
operated by J. A. Kerr, as a hardware 

stoic, lias chanced hands and will soon 
be in full charge of The Western Hard- 
ware Company. The new firm is com- 
posed of three of the brightest and most 
promising of the younger business men 
of the town, each one an acknowledged 
master in his own department. T. W. 
Peart, of The Smith & Fergusson Com- 
pany, will take charge of the store and 
stock of hardware, furniture and furnish- 
ings. G. H. Barr will handle the finances, 
and our old friend, Arthur Jackson, also 
of The Smith & Fergusson Company, will 
have charge of the tinshop and mechan- 
ical department. With such heads of de- 
partments there cannot be any doubt as 
to the ultimate success of the undertak- 
ing. We extend our congratulations to 
our enterprising young friends and be- 
speak for them a share of the public 
patronage which they will undoubtedly 
merit. — Regina, N.W.T., Standard. 



THE LAKE ST. JOHN VALLEY. 

EVERY day Canadians are having their 
eyes opened lo the wonderful pos- 
sibilities of their country. New regions 
with immense natural resources are being 

constantly brought to their attention. 
Usually these new fields of enterprise are 
situated thousands of miles away, either 
in the Far West or in the Par North. But 
there is a district of Canada which is being 
at present exploited that lies not two hun- 
dred miles from the ancient capital. This 
is The Lake St. John Valley, which for 
extent and resources is second to no other 
district in the Dominion. 

Conjointly, the Quebec and Lake St. 
John Railway and The Lake St. John 
Colonization Society have issued a hand- 
some souvenir book about Ibis district, 
entitled, "Wheat Fields and Industries ot 
Northern Quebec." The contents read in 
many parts like a fairy tale and the numer- 
ous large illustrations bear out the wonders 
related in the reading matter. The object 
of the book in its own words is "to tell of 
the attractions which the Lake St. John 
country possesses for the farmer and the 
farm laborer, both in its wheat and dairv 
lands; for the European workman in its 
mills and factories; for the lumberman 
and the miner, and especially for the 
capitalist and the speculator who have 
money to invest in rich forests and mining- 
lands, and in the magnificent waterfalls 
which furnish suoh cheap and easy methods 
of developing the great natural resources 
of this wonderfully rich and fertilecountry. " 

This object has been amply accomplish- 
ed in the half-hundred pages of this 
souvenir book. The contents are method- 
icallv arranged and the important points 
receive their due emphasis. 



The reason for using 
Apollo galvanized iron is: 
it is the best iron: works 
easiest: makes the best job, 
and costs least for labor. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

i/S St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



1 I 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




ROYAL-CANADIAN 

is H. Boker & Co's. best concaved plain Razor. Finest Quality without waste on 
fancy work. Lowest price for the very finest grade of goods. 

The brand is registered at Ottawa 

For sale by all Leading Wholesale Houses. 
CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



.1 nniliii > 16, 1908 

These prices ire for such qualities and 
quantities as aw usually ordered by retail 
• 1 1 « 1 ■ ■ rs on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest Sgures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay Large cash buyers cam fre- 
nuentlj make purchases al better prices The 
Editor is anxious to be Informed al once of 
an] apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
Is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN 

IjhiiIi an. I Klah* and snails 

56 and 3Mb bigots, 100 lb. •» M 

TINPLATHS 

Charcoal Plates Blight 

m L.8., equal to Bradley Per boa 

l C, usual sizes 

IN " 8 25 

INN " 9 75 

I'. nil.. us. equal to Bradley 

I (' 6 75 

IX 8 25 

INN 9 75 

Karen and Vulture Grades 

I c. usual sizes 5 00 

IX '• 6 00 

IX X 7 00 

I N N N " 8 00 

IX . 121x17 * M 

I) X 

I> N N 6 00 

Coke Plates Bright. 

i i usual size, 14x30 I 00 

I.C, special sizes, base I 50 

90x36 . .... .... '.MX) 

Chun-. ml Plates Trim 
Dean or .1 G. Grade 

l » . 20x38, 113 sheets 8 50 

IX.. Terae Tin 10 50 

CharooaJ Tin Boiler Plat. - 
( !ookley Grade 

N N. 14x56. 50 sheet bxs i 
" 14x60, ... 7 mi 

14x66, " J 

rinned sin, -is 

72x30 up to .'I gangs 8 

" 36 " 8 50 

II.'oN N % 1 > - I V.V.I. 

i onnn.iii bar, per loo lt> 3 OS 

Refined " " 

II • shoe Iron " 

Hoop steel, 1'. to 3-in base 

Sleigh shoe steel, " ... 2 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

I: i led machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 

T. FirthSCo. stool steel, per lb 13) 

Jess ip's tool steel I) 14 

Morton a toolsteel 12J 13 

Bla< N I ». ,n I hi I; I 

tool steal 10 11 

elms. Leonard ■ tool -r, ,1 n us n ir.i 

Park's "Silver tool sti • I 13 It 

" SpeoSal 'I l". o 20 

Jonas S i olvi i - tool steel. ... 10 20 
\n Hardening" 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

BOILED TUBES Pet f.".t 

1.1, and 4 inch.... - DOS 

* 16 

3in. 

3J in 10 

4 in 31 



STEEL noil, Kit PLATE 

i in 3 SO 3 60 

S-16in 2 00 3 70 

| in. and thicker 2 50 2 60 

BLAt K SHEETS. Com D.Fl 

10 and 13 gauge 2 65 2 76 

18 gauge 2 86 3 00 

30 " 2 85 3 00 

33 to 24 gauge 3 96 3 26 

38 " 3 06 3 'in 

28 ' 3 15 

OOPPEK WIRE 
Discount, .V) per cent. 

I \n mi \ PLATES 

All dull 53 sheets 2 !«) 3 00 

Half-polished 3 00 3 10 

All bright 3 75 3 83 

li:i>N ptpe 
Black pipe Per loo feel 

inch 3 00 3 25 

" 2 30 2 40 

" 2 65 

J " 2 85 

i " 3 65 

1 " 5 20 

i; " 7 35 

1 " 8 95 

3 " 12 55 

H " 3100 

3 " 25 00 

34 •' 32 00 

t " 38 50 

41 ■' 45 (X) 

5 " 48 00 

6 " 63 00 

Galvanized pi|H- 

i inch 3 20 

3 46 

J " 3 85 

I " 5 00 

1 '■ 7 20 

11 " 10 OS 

1' " 12 20 

2 •' 16 85 

Malleable Fittings Discount 30 p.c 

Cast Iron Fittings 
On all oast irnn fittings, Including plugs, 
bushings, anions and nipples, 50 & 10 p.c ,li». 

All others diaoount 60 p c 

GALVANIZED 3HEETS Queen's 

Q.C < "in' it Bell Head 

ige 

18 in 24 gaugi I 06 9 ;:. 3 75 i 06 
I 35 i 00 I «' 4 35 
4 50 4 35 4 06 4 50 
Am, riran brands, 94.40 for 28 gauge, 
e lots 10 to IS) extra. 

i HUN 

Proof mil. 3-16 hi., per loo in 

7 86 8 10 

5 18 '• 5 35 5 50 

I "4 50 I IS 

7-18 " t 2 _ . t 50 

"J "4 30 

5-n; ■ t OS 

. " .. 4 00 4 60 

. " 4 00 4 50 

Halter, kennel and i»'.*t chains, 4n to 40 mi. I 

5 per cent 

( ..u r its In j. c 

Tie ..in chains 
stall fixtures 

Trmr chain - 16 p , 

Jack chain, irnn. single an. I double, discount 

35 ,. , 

.lu<k chain, lira*.-, single anil iloulile, ilia 
■ imn! 40 |. , 

16 



OOPPEK 

Ingot !■■ i 1001b. 

13 ."ill 
Lake Superior. 

Cut lengths, round, I 00 35 00 

round ana squan . 
1 to 2 Inches, 23 is) 25 w 

Bheel 

Plain. 14 ii/ . anil light. I60Z., 

14x48 and 14x00 22 00 33 60 

Plain, 14 <>/ . and light, 16 oz., 

irregular sizes 33 SO 23 on 

Tinned copper sheet 24 on 

Planished 32 on 

Braziers' (in sbei 

1x6 ii . 35 to 30 lb. each, per lb. ... 

" 35 In 45 •' " .... 32 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 21 

BOILED AM) T K PITTS 

Plain tinned, per 11. 38 

Spun, per lb "32 

III! ASS 

Rod and sh, it. 14 to 30 gauge, 1". per cent 

Sheets, hard roll.-.!. 2x4 

Tubing, base, per lb 234 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 5 50 6 00 

Domestic ' 

/IM SHEET 
5 • -hi casks 6 00 6 35 

Part rusks 6 35 6 50 

LEAD 

ted Pi;;. p. r 100 ll> 3 ."ill 

Bar, perlb 06 

Sheets, •.". lb. sq. ft, by mil ... o 06j 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb " 06 

Hon Cutsheetsfte perlb. r extra Pipe, 

by ilir lull, nsnal weights per yard, lists at 7< 
mil 371 p.c. .lis. f.o.h Toronto. 
n-iii: Cutlengtba, net price, waste pipe 
9 ii lengths, lists al 8r. 

SHOT. 
Common, 36.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.00 
iht ltxi lb.; buck, seal and ball, K.50 \h> 
count, -"-" p.c Prices are f.o.b loronto. 
Hamilton, Montreal, St John and Halifax. 
Terms, 3 p .-. cash, freights equalized. 

soil, PIPE AND FITTINGS 
>il pipe, diaoount, 45 per oent 

flttinga, discount 50per cant 
Med and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, -lis ."»'i 

and in per • ■ nt 
7 anil 8 in pipe, discount t'i p. I . - Ql 

sol, in B Pn II. 

Bar, half -and-half, guaranteed 30 

if ami half , commercial 19 
Rettned 
Wiping 17 

\n riMONl 
Dookaon ■ .per lb. 

Willi I II \n Pi 100 lb 

I'm, I no 5 36 

I .v." 

N I 

Ho. 3 3 87j I I- 

N I 

Munro's Select Flake White 
Elephant and 1 1 Pure 

I'.raii.liain - B B Genuine 7 no 

N 
\i . , ...I 

1 1 Pure 



BED LEAD 

Genuine, 580 H> .asks, perewt 
Genuine, Inn 11. k. ga, 

pi r CWt 

Ho i. nxi lb kegs, per ■ »> t io 

WHITE /ini 

Kxtla P.nl S. al 
Xn 1 

Ho 2 

DRV WHITE l.l \l' 
Pure, kegs 

No I. .'ask- 

X'n. I. k. gs 

PBEPABED PAINTS 
In 1. | and 1 gallon im- 
pure, per gallon 

Second qualities, pergauon l mi 

Barn (in bbls I 80 90 

Tin- Shrrwiti Williams paints 1 ;.i 

Canada Painl ('<> snure l 35 

Toronto Lead It Color Co's pure l 36 

pure l 30 

Stewart ft w i ■ t Ibamplon 

pure | 00 
Standard Painl Co.'i "New 

Era l 3d 
Tin Fran 

Brand I 36 

II. . I''l ! 

British Navj deck I 50 

Hollywood past., paint 1 4n 

liqiiiil paint 
rlimr paint 

COLORS IN OIL 

35 lb. I .hi} 

v. ii. ii. in red, p. i li. "i ii i» 

Chrome yelkta 13 14 

Golden ochn us in 

French .. ... 

Marine black 

Chrome gn en 10 

French Imp, rial gr- • i. ii p.- 

Signwriten I. lark. 

Burnt amber on 

si, -una ii 1| 

Raw amber nit 

ii. i ii ii 

COLORS, DRV 

.'II ihIii.-. bbls I 90 

Velloe oohn ill- bbb 
Y. Bow ochre i Is. Belle) i r. 

I ■ Is iH'lirr 

Venetian n d (b< si i. bhl I 75 

cwt 

can oxides, bbls 

Ms I ji 17", 

magnetic oxidi s, 9 
Burnl sienna, pure, per lb 

umber, 

imber 

sack, pure 
Chrome yeuow, pun 

Chrome greens, pure i- . 1 

Golden ochre 
Dltramarine blue, in . - 

boxes, i- r ii. 
Kir,- proof mineral, per !<■' lb 
lii-iiu. 

M ti color, per l'>> lb 
Purr Indian N 

Whiting, bhl 

Pl.i I STON1 

o u7 
100-11. . Iota, .In 08 



CANADIAN HARDWARE ANu METAL 



WADE & BUTCHER'S 

"SPECIAL" Razors 

Ape unequalled fop quality and finish. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., - MONTREAL 



Sole Agents for Canada 



PI Tl \ 

Bulk in bbta 1 90 

Bulk in less iiuuntiiy 2 06 

Bladders in bbls '.' 15 

Bladders in ken, boxes orlooee. 2 4<i 

Bladdt tins 9 35 

Bladders in 131 lb. tins 2 66 

Bladders in bulk or tins lees than 100 lb. 2 90 

\ nMMi n 

In 5-gaL lots. Per gal. Net 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 00 

Pale durable body 4 10 1 25 

rubbing 285 320 

Gold size, japan 285 300 

No I brown Japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 125 

No. 1 1 10 

Hani nil finish 1 65 1 75 

Light oil finish 1 40 1 60 

Damar 1 70 1 85 

Shellac, white 235 245 

onuge 2 25 2 35 

Turpentine, brown japan ... 125 130 

black japan 85 1 20 

No. 1 50 75 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

(Irani! ine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, 11.20; 

size 2. 70e.: size 3, tOo. each. 
Sherwm-willianu kopal varnish, assorted 
ease, from [ pte to 1 gal.. $2.50. 

• /LBTOB OIL. 

Bast India, incases, per lb.... 09$ 10 

small lots 10 10J 

COD OIL, STC. 

Cod oil. per gal 050 055 

Pure olive 1 20 

•• neatsfoot 90 

..I.I K 

Common 08 09 

French medal 10 14 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 25 30 

strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 15 16 



HARDWARE. 
Ut MUNITION. 

( 'art i id 

I; i; Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 per cent 

Rim Fin 1'istol. discount 40 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p.c., Amer. 

Central Fin Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary. Dominion, 1"» per cen( 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, add 5 i>er cent to list B B Caps, 
tnt 40 percent, American. 

Loaded and empty Shells. "Trap' ami 

" Dominion grades, 25 per cent Kival 
and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list 
Shot Shells, 55 per cent 
Primers. Dom., 30 per cent.; America! 

tVada i«-t Hi 

tick white fell wadding. In <-lb 

"I 00 

hick brown or grey fell wads, in 

J-lb. hags ...... 70 

biCS while card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 90 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of GOO each, 8 gauge 56 

Thin card wads, in l»oxesof 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

25 

Thin card v >s of 1,000 



Chemically prepared black edge grey 

cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each Pel M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads. In 
boxes of 250 each 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

6 and 6 " 1 90 

ADZES 

Discount 20 per cent. 

AN\ n.s 

Wright s. 80-lb. and over 10J 

Hay Budden. 80-lb. and over 091 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11} 

At'llERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent Off list 

axes 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz. 5 50 10 00 

Double hit, " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes. 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

AXLE UREASE. 

( Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best nuality 13 00 15 00 

BATH TIBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

Standard Enameled. 

Si-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

" 2nd " 20 00 

BABBIT METAL. 

•'Tandem, A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11J 

Fiirt ionless Metal ' 23 

Hercules " 15 

Syracuse Smelting Works: 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough. " 40 

Hard. " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra o 15 

The Canada Metal Co : 

Imperial, genuine 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No 2 10 

No. 3 006 

\ 1 05 

IIKI.I.N 

Hand 
'.II l>er cent 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

( 'om 

American make, discount 633 pel ' • 
in. discount 45 and 50 per rent 

llr.MI 

< Jongs. Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 
American, each 125 3 00 

|| Ml-. 

American, per lb 35 o to 

BELLOW - 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

■ n . per doz ... .. 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount '0 pi 



BELTING 

Extra, 60 per cant 

Standard, 60 and 10 per rent 

No. 1. not wider than 6 in.. 60, 10 and LOpei 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 In., 75 per cent 

HITS. 

A tiger. 

Gil urs. discount 60 and 5 pel cent 

Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 47$ to 50 per cent. 
Expansive. 
Clark s. 40 per cent. 

(Jinilet. 

Clark's, pet doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07; 1L> 

nol.TS AND NUTS. Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, common (si list) 55 and 10 

" full sq.(s2. 40 list) 55 and 10 
" " Norway Iron (S3 

list.) 50 and 10 

Machine Bolts, all si/.es 50 and 10 

Plough Bolts 50 and 10 

Plank Bolts 50 and 10 

Bolt Ends 50 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65 and 10 

Coach Screws, cone point 66§ and 10 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3<c. iter lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods, per lb., 5$ to 6c. 
Nuts, in 50-lh. lots. }c. per lb. extra: in less 
than 50-lh. lots, $c. extra. 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 5C 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS 

Discount 62$ per cent. 

BROILERS. 

Light, discount 65 to 67j per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 674 per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., discount 37' percent 

Henis, No. 8 per doz 6 00 

He,, is, No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Qui en City " .... 7 50 

1.1 n TIERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 1100 

American " 12 00 20 00 

III Tl HER KNIVES. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 1 75 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb., 

per roll 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 66 lb., 

per roll 

( larpefrFelt pel ton 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 

Tar " " 400 " 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 

1 1 K & I X 1, " 400 " 

Resin-sized 400 

Oiled Sheathing ... " 600 " 

tilled " .... " 400 " 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 

Roof " small packages 

I: fined Tar per barrel 

Coal Tar 

I m;,1 Tar. less than barrels per gal. 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 

BILL RINGS 
i oppei 13.00 for 2$-inch, and 11.90 for 2-inch. 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose I'm, discount 60 percent 



90 

1 15 

15 HO 

ii 35 
45 
50 
,1 60 
&5 

40 

1 10 
70 
17 
25 
4 50 
4 00 
15 
u 85 



Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and '-" pet cent 

Loose Pill, diSCOUnl 65, 10 and 21 per cent 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70. 7" and 5 percent 
i ten Bronzed per pair 40 66 

I kill STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's " 8 50 

i U3TOB8. 

Bed. new list, discount 55 to 57j per cent. 
Plate, discount 52! to 571 Per cent. 

CATTLE LEA - 

NOS. 31 and 32 per gross 8 50 '.l 50 

• II U.K. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, discount 60 and 1U per cent. 

Warnock s, discount 50 and 10 per cent 

P. s. & w. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent 

CHURNS. 

Revolving * hums, metal frames No, II. s.x 

No. 1. $8.50; No 2, J9.00; No 3, - 

No. 4, 812.00; No. 5. slfi.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames, 20c, each less than the above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 53 
per cent. : from stock in Montreal. 51 per 
cent. Terms 4 months or 3 per cent, cash in 
30 days. 
Churn frames, including hearings, levers, etc. 
Nos. 0. 1, 2 anil 3, wood, $2.40: and 4 and 
5, S2.65. Metal frames. 25c. extra. Dis- 
count 15 per cent., net 30 days. 

CLIPS. 

Axle, discount 65 per cent. 

closets. Net 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet., *9 60 
Emb, " " " . 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Ten. Syphon Washout 6 00 
Emb. " " " . . 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain. . 9 60 
l.i» " " " emb. .. 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 3 75 

Emb. " 4 00 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Ontario Syphon .let. plain 11 70 

Low " " " enihd. 12 30 

1 loset co, meet ion 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 70 

Basins, oval. 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 25 

COMPASSES, dividers, ETC. 
American, discount 62$ to 65 percent 
CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated 

2-inoh per 100 feet S 00 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 M 

OB Mills, 8RAIX 
Canadian, discount 20 to 25 percent 

CROSS, II sl« II 1\ DLLs 

s. ,v 1),, No. 3 per paii i, 

S. &D„ " 5 " 224 

s ft D., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

BOOB SPRINGS 

Torrcy's Rod (15 p.c ), per doz 2 00 

Coil " 88 1 60 

English " 2 00 4 00 

a 

DRAW KNU I - 

Coach and Wagon, discount 50 and 10 | er 
Carpenters', discount 60 and 10 pel cent 



it; 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

Has it Ever Occurred to You 

that you could largely increase your business, confer a favor upon us, and benefit your customers by 
advising them to use our Building Papers, Roofing Felts and Wire Edged Ready Roofing ? 

We will guarantee to supply you with the best of material, but, you must do the missionary work 
among your customers. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montrea 



I'Kll.t.s 

lluml md Ba 
m ii i:i r ■ Fall-, per da . Ml Ibl 

DKM.I. HI I- 

Mome, ,li -. '.mill 37 i In -Ml ikt oral 
Btandard, discount SOandotODeper ..Hi 

I U i I I- 

c. mini. in. ..irk tmed, dlsoooiil 36 pei oral 

> LI I I l:m ' ii- 

!ii 111. h Ikt 100 fl 3 10 

ki.iiiih - (stovepipe i 

."> ami 6-inch, oomraon per doc 1 20 

7 Inch " I SB 

Polished, 16c per dozen extra. 

,, 11 i ,.s- 

Diaoeuol to i«t sent 

I -, I [CHIOS MNB 

Iron, discount 44> jht oant 

r LI tORl M UK CAM 

Discount ntT revised list. 10 per 

KILKS VS|. B V-l m 

(ireut Western 7n and m per oent 

7n " 10 

Kearnei a Fool 70 " lu 

Dkatona 70 " lo 

\ i.i' i iiim 70 '• 10 

J Burton Smith 70 " 10 

Mi i lellan 70 " l" 

Eagle 70 '• id 

Nioholson, till niul 10 to 60, lOaml 5 

Royiil 80 

Globe 70 to 76 

Black Diamond, 60 ami 10 to 60, 10 ami ."> per 
oent 

JowittS, English list 35 to 27} per cent. 
Nioholson PBe Co s "Snnpliriiv lie handle, 
per gross 85o t<> -«1.50. 

slabs 
Window. Box Price. 

Slur |i Hiii ml 

si/. United Per Par Pet Par 

50 ft. loo ft. 50 fi 100 ft 

Under 26 ... 2 20 4 25 .... 6 25 

26 to 40 9 m 4 66 .... 6 75 

II to 60 5 10 .... 7 50 

51 10 60 5 35 .... 8 50 

61 to 70 5 75 .... 9 75 

71 to 80 6 25 .... 11 00 

81 to 85 7 00 .... 1 

86 to 90 7 75 .... 15 00 

91 to 95 17 50 

!»>tol00 

OAI OK 

Marking, Mortise, Etc 
Stanley -. discount 60 to 66 per cenl 
Wire Bengal 

Won, .. \ .- 26 to 33 saeh 1 66 I 4n 

II LLTBBfl 

Hope, . inch i» 1 gross 

Ri>I«e. I " .... 9 00 

'•• , inch " 14 00 

leather. 1-inch per dos 3 87 '. 4 On 

leather. 1J " '• 6 15 5 20 

,Wcl. " 1 87 

II v MMl EtS 

Kail 
lie's, discount 5 to 10 |ht cenl Canadian 
discount 65 to '27\ i»-r cent 
Taok 

Hagnetic perdox. 1 l( 1 20 

- 'life. 
Canadian par lb. 07} 081 

Ball Peso 
English and Canadian, per lb 23 26 

HAM 

\v per dox mi 1 60 6 00 

loot pet dos l on l 50 ' 



Pork 






i \ B . dlsoounl in pet cent, 


i, , |se* 


list 


ii- 






i \ i: , discount 10 per oent., 


II Vis,', 


lint 


S.Hl 






American p, i 'l<>/ 


1 00 


1 96 


Plane. 






\ in, in. in per nross 


3 15 


:i 7.". 


lliiinim'r ami Hatohel 




i lanadian, dlsoounl 4" per c mi 






' ■ Cut Sums 












II vsi.i M 


lloZ. 


pal] - 




5 8.5 


6 00 


Stearns, 4 inch 


5 00 




Lane's covered 

No. 11. ."i foot run 

No 11}, 1U foot run 

No 12. 10-fOO( run 

No 14, 16 fOOl run 

U - 1 > n T trai k, pei 1 




8 40 
10 80 
IS 60 

21 IHI 

II III' 



II LBVI8T TOOLS 

Dlsoounl 80 and 10 per emu 

II ATI 1IKTS 

( lanadian, discount 40 to 42! per oral 

II ISl.K- 

Hlinil. Parker's, discount I6J percent 

Mi avy T ami strap, 4-in., per 11» o 06J 

5-in . " 06} 

6-inu, " n 06 

8-in , " ... 061 
10-in.. " 

Light T ami strap, dlsoounl 66 and 5 per cent 

Si I. -w book and hinge 

6 to 10 In per 100 lh 4 50 

12 in up " 3 25 

Spring per gro. pain 10 50 

ii,. i - 

Garden, Mortar, etc, discount 60 to 60 and 10 

per cent. 
Planter per do/. 4 00 ISO 

llill.I.OVV WARE 

Disc. mot IS niul 6 per cent 

IIimiK* 

Cast Iron. 

Binl case ]>cr do/. .50 1 10 

Clothes line " 27 63 

Barn " 72 88 

Batandooal per nr<>. 100 3 00 

Chandelier perdox. 50 loo 

Wrought Iron. 

Wrought hooks and staples, Canadian dia- 

eimnt 47' per cent 

Wire 

Hat and coat, diaoounl IS percent 
Belt pe. I. n>i ... 60 

bright, diaoounl SSperoent 

B0B8I NAILS 

"C brand. 10, 10 us >fl li-t i Oral 

M i mil. 60, lo and 6 js-r oent I head 

Countersunk. )V> per cent 
\l march/ 1 66 i»er cent. 

" Peerless 60 and 7i i»er oral die. 

BORSX8B01 B 

i O.B Montreal 

\ \ 

Iron B ami ami 

larger, smaller. 
Ught iniili'ini ami heav> .... 3 35 3 rtl 
hoi B 3 ItO 

Light 3 16 I n 

Featherweight (all sizes) t 86 

I'llR Toronto, Hamilton. London anil 

Guelph, 10c per keg additional. 
Ti.e welghl si.'.-i ihi les 6 7" 

I vr vs s I !• » (ii 

ii oht 46 and 6 per oral »ff list, lime 1899 
n i ii. k- 

pn do* 3 00 



KIM 

Brass spun, 7) pei i Ilsoounl off new lisi 

Coppei pel lb, 30 o hi 

American, 60 and lo to ii"i and 6 inr cent 

ki:i s 
Lock, Canadian dls 10 to H) and 10 per cenl 

I 'aim, el, trunk ami pailluck. 
Ainerii an . per gross 60 

K Nun- 
lapiiinii ,1 ami N .1" . pel 

dox I 50 9 50 

Bron/. i pei .in/ 9 76 ;> 36 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 on '.i 00 
Shutter, porcelain, F ■ I. 

ew pei gross l 30 4 in 

White door knobs perdox 96 l 00 

II * V h SI V I - 
Net p| i 

I. V Ml' VV II hs 

Discount 80 pei cenl 

I V s I I I: s- 

Cold Blast |M-rilo/. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright - 8 "in 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " ton 

Dashboard, cold blast " '.' no 

No il - :, 7.'. 

Japanning, 50c per doz, extra. 

I I MuS -ill I I /t |.- 

I'oicclaiii lined per. In/ L' -.'o 6 60 

Galvanized " 1 87 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

Kini:. 1,'las.s " I ihi 

All glass " 50 90 

LINKS. 

Pish per gross 1 Or 2 50 

Chalk 1 90 7 40 

I. VM S Mow It:- 

H lyatt, 12 in wheel 7 50 

Slar 5 50 

4 '.HI 

Philadelphia, 10-in wheel 6 00 

Ontario. 12 75 

Diaeount 50 per cent. 

I ... K - 

( lanadian, 40 to 40 ami 10 |kt cent 
ti I Em-in. . . per doz. 3 oo 

I aliiuet. 

Eagle, diaoounl SO per cenl 
Padlocks 
English and Am perdox, 50 6 00 

niavian " 1 1)0 2 40 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 |h - 
H v< in s i -■ 
Iron I 
Flat heail. diaoounl 85 per l rat 
Round head, discouol 90 |mt cent 
SULLU i- 
liths .perdox. 1 '2.5 1 50 
Carpenters', hickory, 1 25 

Lignum Vita. 3 $5 :, 00 

Caulking, each 60 3 00 

M \ IT. .1 h~ 

11. 111 pm dm 5 'in 

SOtAT Ct 1 1 1 1 - 
American, diaeount 33^ jut cent 
German, IS i» 
limn each 1 IS 

MII.K IAS TUIMMIS..- 
Discount 2-"> per cenl 

s VII - 1 u 

2il ami 3,1 :l 4". 3 45 

3.1 S 10 .1 IS 

4 ami 5.1 
6 anil 7.1 

I and 9d 9 80 I 80 

in and ISd 9 56 9 BE 

16 and SOd 

SO and .vhi (base) 9 t". I IE 

Cnl nails in cadets - 
\\\rr nails in earl. its rw ES 4" 
Cut nails in carlota .1 
Galranlxing So, per lb net ■ 
\tr». 

nails, diacom 
Coopers naibi,-iilarrrnnl 30 • 
Flour barrel nails discoanl SSpercent 



S VII. II Ii 

German and \ 

S VII -II- 

s,|uuie. round and ■- tagon, 

D'a ml I 

I 1 1: V si I 1 IS.. 

aTeah, 19 « g . .|i- 60, 10 and 5 pei 

i. p , 

"IKI M 

per 100 lb 

I - \.ny 

mil 
Mi « lan - Mode) galvanized 
oil can, »iih pump. 6 gallon, 
pei dozen 10 00 

lUnl 50, .Ml ami III p, 

1 opper per dos 1 - 

1 'i 
Malleable, discount i 1 

1. vi. v LMIZXO evils 
Dufferin pattern pail-, discount 16 1 • 
pattern, aiscounl r. per . enl 
Galvanized waantnba, .Ii-. nl 1 

Pm It, « VI: 1 

111 per . . lit off li-t. .In,, 

10-ql Baring sap bucketa, discount K) per cenl 

6. lu and 14 ip flaring pails, dit K p. 1 

(reamer cans, discount 4.1 p. 

II. K- 

I'm dozen 00 

in 11 II s VII.- 

.111 bead pet gross l 86 1 58 

Bi hi ad o M 1 "i 

III I I III Hill 

Tin and gilt discount 75 |nr cent 

II SI TAK 

I pint in 1 in- p. ' gross 7 80 

1 " 

I-I.1M- 

Wood bench, ( ..,, ehan dii 
American diaoounl 50 pei 

Woo I 

41) pei 

ll.vsi in. ,s- 

Engliab p. 1 dox 9 00 

FLUBS vsi, sill) I - 
Button- genuine, l»r dos pair-. ,li- 

Button's Imitation perdox. 5 '»> 
German " 

I'll Mm il- BI v-- • ...u.- 
Stanilanl Compression w ' 

.1 "st i Cuahloi 

Fuller work. ■ t i — « - I 

6 dozen lot- and over of the ai*'*.-. , \ir» .lis- 
count In per ' enl 

W 1 ml 60 

jht cenl With. Li 

aii extra d f 10 per cent 

.1 \l ! 

diaoounl 56 per 1 

- 
.lis, ount 65 1 ■ 
.1 M T R amatoi Vi.u 

cent 

>nl Radiator Valvi 

cent 

Patent i/iii.k Opening \ 
|ier ■ ■ 

\ 1 .. 

No 7 Fuller- 

\ I 

Patent Compression CiiAliion. t«j.in 
• is k. not and 00M 

)ialh 
N 
Square bead brass 

■ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



-TO IMPORT. 



Prompt Deliveries 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BENT GLASS ° ,f a ^ kinds, our own manufacture. Closest Prices. 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



Warerooms and Offlces-135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



PRESSED SPIKES 

Discount 'J 4 .': pei oent 

ri LLEYB 

Hothouse ...per dor. 55 100 

Axle 082 33 

Screti 27 1 00 

Awning 38 '-' 50 
IM MPS 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher epoul 140 2 10 

II \. BBS 

Saddler - perdoz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductor's " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners, solid persel ... 72 

hollow per inch — 1 00 

HANOI BOUSES 

I).. mini. mi. 30 gallon net 6 00 

35 •' " 7 00 

" S 00 

Ronald's Galvanized, 30 gallon, ". 7 40 
35 " " B l" 

in 

Copper, 31) gallon " 22 IK) 

■• 35 " " MOO 

4i) •• 28 00 

nl off copper boilers 15 per cent 

It \KKS 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up. 

RAZORS. pet doz. 

Elliots 4 00 18 00 

Butl< rs&Co.e 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 1100 

King Cutter 12 50 15 00 

Wade s: Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theilea Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Bailey's - 6 00 12 00 

BaUey h llrantfc.nl 10 00 11 00 

tart." Magnetic 15 00 

<; r i!T' ivorite 10 75 

Griffoi 13 00 

Griffon Safety Razors 13 50 

Griffon Stropping Machines 13 50 

RBQIS1 BBS 

Discount fi p. 

I; ■ \ ET9 l\ D Bl RR8 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount GOaod 

In pei 

I Burrs, discount 55 per cent 

I - on Iron Rivets in 1 II. carton 

per II. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in ' !>• cartons, 1. 

per lb. 

i Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 45 

per cenl discount. Cartons, lc. per lb. 

ext ra. net. 
Copper Burrs only, discounl 30 and 10 per ent 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, Hb. 

RIVET -I I 9. 

Canadian, discount 36 to 37!. per cent 

ROPE, i i' 

Sisal. 12 

Pure .Manilla » M 

"British Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and largi I 16 

•• V32 in. h .0 21 

; inch 22 

08 

Lath Vain. -ingle o 1 

double UJ 
..1 cord, 48 reel pi I doa 

•■ 73 feel 95 

in i.i - 

i. ,', and 10 i« 

iwoiint 37i to 4n pet cenl 
-u. [BOMS 
M, . i . polished, per set 70 

0, ni. l.l. plated, " o 80 

-AM. >M' I Mil:-, PAPER 

l. discount, 40 and 5 pei cent 

■ 

; ..Ivan.. 



sap spot ra 

Bronzed iron with hooks . . . .per 1,000 9 50 

> \ Ws 

Hand, Disston's, discount L2j percent. 

s \ I) . discounl 40 per cent 

Crosscut, Disston's.. ..per fool 35 55 

S. & I). « lis -mint 35 pel CI 111 00 NOS, 2 anil 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

frame only 75 

s vsu WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 1001b. 2 50 2 75 

Solid " 1 75 2 00 

svsll CORD. 

Pel Hi 23 30 

si» sirs per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets, No 1 Woodyatt [Morrill) 4 25 

X-Cul Sets, No. 3 Woodyatt i Morrill) 9 50 

si M.KS. 

Burrow, Stewart .v Milne 

Imperial Standard, discounl tOpercent 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cenl 
Champion Scales, discount Xy per rent 
Fairbanks statu lan I. discount 35 per cent . 
Dominion, discount 55 per cent. 
Richelieu, discount 55 per cent 
Warren b new Standard, discounl 40 percent. 
champion, discount 55 per oent 
Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent 

SCREW DRIVERS 

Sargent's per doz. 65 1 00 

SCREEN DOORS 

C hi. .n doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 3-in. style per doz. 6 60 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 3-in. style... .per doz. 6 80 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish per doz. 8 15 

4-in. style 20c. per dozen extra. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, I' II . bright and Bteel, discount 87!: 

and 10 per cenl 
Wood, i; H, bright, dis. 82J and 10 per cent. 
F. 11 , brass, .lis. 80 and lo pei cent 
R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 per cent. 
F. H , bronze, dis. 75 percent 
" R H . " dis 70 per cent 
Drive Screws, dis 87'. and lo pei cenl 

Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 mi 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set case hardened, dis 60 per cent 
Square < 'ap. .lis. 50 and 5 per cenl 
Hexagon t 'ap. dis 45 per cenl 

SCYTHES. 

Per do/., net 5 00 8 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS, 
t ana.lian, discount 40 per cent 

SHEARS 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discounl BO 

and 2' per cent 
Bailey Cutlery. .Japan Handles, discount 67| 

per oent 
Seymour's, disc, .mil .V) and 10 per cent 

BHOI ELS IMi SPA DEB 
Canadian, discount 4 I and .". pel Cent 

slNKS. 

Cast iron, 16x24 85 

18 \ 30 1 no 

18x36 ^ 1 40 

^\ IP8. 

■ i German, dis :ounl 25 per cenl 

Lock, Andrews 1 50 11 50 

SOLDERING [RONS, 

1.1 '.-lb per lb .... 37 

2 II. v.-i " .... 34 

svl IRES. 

Iron, No 4'.)3 , . . per do/. 2 10 

" No 4-.il " 3 25 ■ 10 

Steel, .lis. oiinl 60 to 60 and 5 per cent 

id Bevel, .lis. ount 50 i" 5Sj per cent 

- I * Mill, w UU 

Plain, discounl 75 and I2j pei cenl off re- 

i list, 
Retiiined, discount 75 per cenl ->ti i >-% i 



si Mil a 

Galvanized 3 35 ; 

Plain 2 90 3 13 

( 'impels . discount i'i pei cenl 

Poultry netting staples, discounl 10 pel cenl 

STOCKS ANI> DIBS. 

American discounl 25 per cent 

STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindustan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " 13 

Axe " .... 15 

Turkey " 50 

Arkansas 1 50 

Watcr-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 2-in.,40 to 300 lb.,per ton .... 25 00 

" under HI lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 
STOVEPIPES 

5 and inch, per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMKI.INK STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4, 3 do/, in case net cash .... 4 80 

No. 0. 3 doz in as. 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS. In 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 and 131 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned . . 85 

Carpet tacks, blued so and 15 

tinned 80 and 20 

fin kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

1 weights 60 

Swedes OUJ backs, blued and tinned 

In hulk 80 and 111 

In dozens . . . . • 75 

Swedes, upholsterers , bulk . . .85, 12£ and 12J 
" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12' 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpel lacks .'..'. 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52'. 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout Ralls, blued 65 anil 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

I'm. finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 1" 

" iii bulk 15 

solid beads, m bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails. 25 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.'. 90 and 10 

bulk. to 

Shoe nails 60 

Clinch and duck rivets 1. 

TAPE LINES 

English, ass skin per do/. 2 75 5 mi 

English, Pan ni Leathei .... 5 50 9 75 

i In si.rman's jach 90 2 85 

• " si. i 1 .ach 80 8 00 

rlNNERS snips. 
Bailey's, discount 25 per cent. 
THERMOMETERS 

Tin case ami dairy, discount 75 t.. 75 and 10 

pel 

I I' IPS Isle. I I 

Game, Newhouse, discounl 25 per cent 
Game, H. s N . P s \ w . 65 ,„ , cenl 

Came, steel, 72'. 75 pel ' ■>-nl 
TROWELS. 

Hi ton , discount 10 per cent. 

German per doz. 4 75 6 00 

s. .v. I> . discounl 35 pei cenl 

l« IN IS 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, i ol ton, 3-ply 19 

4 ply ii 23 

Mattresi per lb S3 45 

tng " 27 35 

4H 



\ I8E8 

Wright's 18 

Brook's ni. 1 , 

Pipe Vise. Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

No 2 ;, 50 

■Saw Vise 4 51) 9 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

While. Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount "■!> .i.i.l 

10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discounl 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. 

» [RE 

Smooth Steel Wire 

No 0-9 gauge $2 50 

10 . " 6c extru. 

11 " 13c 

12 " 20c 

13 " 30c. '■ 

14 " 40c. " 

15 " 55c. 

16 " 70c. 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 

Extra nel per 100 lb. Oiled wire 10, . 
spring wire si. 25, special liuj baling wire 30c . 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn l.'n , 

charcoal (extra quality) 81.25, packed in .asks 
or cases 1". , bagging and papering 10c . 50 
and loo-lh. bundles 10c., in 25-lb. bundles 
15c., in 5 and 10-Ib. bundles 25c, in 1-lb. 
hanks, 50c., in i-lb hanks 75c. in J-lb. 
hanks si. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cenl 
List of extras: In lOOdb. lots: No 17 
$5— No. 18. S5.50 -No. 19, si; N.. 20. 86 65 
No. 21, $7— No. 22, s; 30 \,,23. s7,65 No 
24. ss No. 25, so N.i 26. 89.50 No. 27, 
§10— No. 28, $11 No. 29, S12 No. 30. $13 
No.31, S14 No. 32. sir, No 33, sl6 No. 34, 
817. Extras uel tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 

S2 Nos. 26-31. st Nns 32-34, S6. Coppered, 
5c. oiling. 10c. in 25-11, bundles, 15e. in5 
and 10-11. bundles, 25c, in 1-lb. hanks. 25c. 

in '-lb. hanks. .'18c. in J-lli. hanks. 50c 
packed in casks or cases, l.",e. bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Brass wire, discount 63i pei cenl off the list. 

Copper wire, discount 62.'. percent net cash 
30 days, f.o.b factory. 

Galvanized wire, per loo lb. Nos 4 and.". 
$3.70 to $3 90 Nos. 6, 7, 8. $3 15 to S3 35 
No. 9. S2.6.5 t,. s2.85-No. 10, #3.20 lo S3. 40 
No. 11. $3.35 lo $3.46 No. 12, S2.80 lo 
$3 Xn .13, $3.90 to 84.10 No 14 s3 75 i. > 
$3.95 No. 15, $4.30 No, 16 $4.30. Base 

sizes. Nns 6 to 9, $2.27} f.O.b Cleveland. In 
carlots USJc. less 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
s4.65: No is $2.90 No 19, $2.60 Hollow 
6 strand. No. 17, $4.30 ! No is. $2 70 ; No 
19, S2.35: No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b Hamilton, 

Toronto. Montreal 

WIHK FENCING 

Galvanized barb 2 90 

Galvanized, plain twist .... 2 '.mi 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b I I, v. land. $2 67j in 

less than carlots, and $2 55 in carlots. 

" [RE ( LOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 80. ft., nel . . 1 40 

T. nns, 3 per .cent off 30 days. 

w isi r COTTON 

Colored per lb. IH', 

While " 08 

WRENCH is 

Acme, discounl 35 lo 371 per cenl 
Agricultural, discount 60 per cenl 
i ni b Genuine, discount 20 to 25 pel cenl 

Towers engineer each 2 mi 7 mi 

S perdoz. 5 80 6 mi 

1: iK s Pipe •• .... 3 HI 

Burrell'a Pipe each .... 3 00 

Pocket per do/ (I 25 2 mi 

» mis.. BBS 

Leader perdoz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian " 24 00 

Hoyal American 24 00 

Sampson " 24 00 

Terms, 4 months, or .') per pent. SOdaj 
WROUGHT rjtOD WASHERS 
Canadian make, discounl 40 per cent, 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 m/cs. Kelt value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " hinlyn ' 
av Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 



Cables - 
Machinery," Newport. 



Emlyn Engineering Works, 
Nkwpokt, Mon., England. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 



Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

M.«,,f.,»„r.r. „f FL»TW*HC, CUTLERY and 
Minufsxturen of ELECT s, PLATE. . . 

Aik for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



KNOX HENRY 

M.avy Hardware and Matal Brokar 
Room 32 Canada Llfa Bide.. MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS-"0" Brand Hone - Nails 
-a Canada Horse Nail Co. 

" BRA88ITE " QOOD8 - Qunn Caator Oo. 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Always 
ask for 



"BAILEY" BRAND CUTLERY 



FULLV WARRANTED 



§5 



Complete Llneo In 

Shears, Scissors, Razors, 

and Butcher Knives. 




e+ -i 
O * 

s ° 



BAILEY CUTLERY GO. 

BRANTFORD, CANADA. LlmlUd 



CHAS. P. CLARK. President. 



JAHEI) CMITTENUEN, Ireaeur.r. 



.ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civihied World. 

Exacutiva Offices: Not. 846 and 848 Broadway, Raw York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information ibat reflects the financial condition and tea 
con'.rollliig cm auiRuiin-HB of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined aa of the merchants. 
by ibe merchants, for tbe merchant*. In procuring, verifying and promulgating Information no effort la spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify Its claim aa an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
fur itsbes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
man l factoring concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Hpaclflc 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 

3UKBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
8T. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG. MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C, IRVING. Gas. Mm, Western Canada, Toronto, 




A Word to the Wise 
is Sufficient. 



Do not be led into placing an order for your 
requirements in the Stove and Range line for this season 
without first communicating with us for prices, and 
seeing a sample of our goods. 

It means dollars and heaps of satisfaction to every 
energetic dealer who handles .... 

"Huron " Stoves and Ranges. 

— Absolutely the finest sold. 
— The trade acknowledge it. 



We shall have a complete and exten 
sive line of all kinds ready for this 
year's trade 



TI1C WESTERN f OUNDRV CO., Limited, 



Quality hirst and \1« 



WISGMAM, ONT. 




^ 




Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Medals 




Awarded 

By JURORS " 

International Expositions 

Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



I! 



&^^^«4/> 




<**'•/%'%%'%'%/%*/%'%<%%<%**%•*«/%*/»«'«' 



1 



PATENT INTERLOCKING 

RUBBER TILING. 

The most perfect floor covering for Hotels, 
Cafes, Business Offices, Banks, Court Rooms, 
Churches, Hospitals, Vestibules, Halls, Billiard 
and Smoking Rooms, Lavatories and Bath Rooms. 

NOISELESS NON-SLIPPERY 

WATERPROOF SANITARY 

Carefully selected range of soft, beautiful 
colors affording ample scope for combinations in 
harmony with surroundings. 

Write for Prices and Particulars 






Sol* Canadian Manufacturers 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooma 
45-47-49 West Front 8t. 



Factoriei ns-165 West Lodge Ave 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO, 

CANADA. 



Portland Cement. 

J. B. WHITE & BROS'. 

Brand. 



Made by The Associated Portland Cement Mfrs. (1900) 
Limited, of London, England, who supplied some 90,000 tons 
of the cement used on the Great Nile Dam. Write us for 
interesting illustrated pamphlet regarding this wonderful work. 



B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO 



LIMITED 



53 St. Sulpice Street, 



IVIOIM 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA. 



VARNISHES and JAPANS 

McCASKILL, DOUGALL & CO. 



■ 



Manufacturers 



MONTREAL 




Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Wont turn white from the effects of water and sun. 

Standard Piano, Fnrnitnre and Decorative Varnishes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and Varnishc 



OFFICES 



161 Summer St., 

BOSTON, Mem., U.S.A. 



30 St John St., 

MONTREAL. 



Neither Fictitiously Named Nor 
Exorbitant, 

Get LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL 



qJ%. 



C^HADIAI^ 



§^> 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 24, 1903. 



NO. 4. 



yp^ MANUFACTURER ^«f| 

ARROW#BRAND 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

% HARDWARE ^ 

e fy SPECIALITIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



» 



"QUELN'J HEAD 

QdLVdMZED IRON 



has led the trade for over forty years 
and still leads. Best quality, most 
durable coating, and greatest care at 
all points of the manufacture, account 
for its continued success. 



JOHN LYSAGHT Limited, Makers, A. C. LE8LIE A CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENO. Managers Canadian Branch. 




'Safford" RadiatoTs 



Manufactured for Heating all 
classes of Buildings by Hot 
Water or Steam. Made in 
different heights, beautiful de- 
signs. Plain or Ornamental. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office and Works: DUFFERIN ST. ^"■- ,— 



TORONTO, CAN. 






O O L S 



PLUMBERS' SUPPLIES 



VALVES 

OILERS 

TAPS 

TORCHES 

TONGS 
VIOES, Etc, 



P 
I 
P 

E 



WRITE FOR PRICES. 



RICE LEWIS 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets, 



MACHINIST GOODS 


LATHE TOOLS 


CHUCKS 


CAR SCREWS 


STOCKS i"»<j DIES 


REAMERS 


DRILLS, Etc. 



& SON, 

INI 



SAMUEL, SONS £> BENJAMIN, 



London and Liverpool, England. 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington St. West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



We carry in stock a full line of the following goods: 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard. 
Rods and Tubes. 

Canada Plates. 

Copper — Bar and Ingot. 
Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Sheathing, Roofing and Brazier's. 

Copperine and Babbitt. 

Cotton Waste. 

Crucibles. 

Eave Trough — Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks. 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 
Galvanized, "Gordon Crown." 
Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 

Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 

Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 

Lead Pipe. 

Solder — Half and Half and Standard. 

Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat. 

Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 

Tin— Bar. Ingot, "L & F." and Straits. 

Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 

Zinc — Sheets and Block. 



INQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturer* of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM. ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



GARDEN 
HOSE 

We solicit your enquiries for 
samples and prices for next season. 

Our line is complete, embracing 
the old lines with some new ones. 

All brands made with our Patent 
SeamleSS Tube to stand city pres- 



sures. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 

flanufacturers of Rubber Goods, 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



Lightning, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 






ARE 



Well Advertised. 
In Demand. 
Easily Sold. 
Satisfactory in Use. 
Of Known Reputation. 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops. 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers. 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free. 



EXCEL IN 



Easy Running. 
Quick Freezing. 
Economy. 
Convenience. 
Practical Results. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., 



Philadelphia, Pa., 

U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRE 
I 



R 

E 



Do You Handle Wire? 



We manufacture and sell 
all kinds of Wire. 

Hay-Baling Wire. 

Oiled and Annealed Wire. 

Plain Galvanized Wire. 

Galvanized Hard Coiled Spring 
Wire. 

IN CARLOADS, OR LESS THAN CARLOADS. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 



After Stock-Taking 

You will be replenishing your stock, so we wish 
to keep before your notice, " Dominion " Goods, all of which 
bear the following Trade Mark, which is a guarantee of quality: 



&s&*, 



SHELF 
GOODS 




HEAVY 
GOODS 



Wood Screws, 

Wire Nails, (Papers), 
Bright Wire Goods, 

Wire Door Pulls, 
Steel and Brass Jack Chain, 
"Crescent" Wire Coat 
and Hat Hooks. 



Wire Nails, 
Iron and Steel, 
Brass and Copper, 
Hay Baling, 
Pulp Binding, 
Galvanized, 
Barbed. 



w 

I 

R 

E 



Bed, Blind, 
and Poultry 



Fence. 



lOTipi rO /Bright and Galvanized 

Netting. J I 

BROOM, MATTRESS, BOTTLING, 
and other wires. 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 



MONTREAL 



Limited 



TORONTO 



Screen Door Hardware. 



(NON-HOLDBACK) 



(HOLD-BACK) 



Made of 
High-Grade 

Steel 
Spring 

Wire 
and in 
Various 
Finishes. 




Spring 
Hinges 

Strong 

and 

Handsomely 

Finished. 




Large 

STOCK 

Prompt 

SHIPMENTS. 



8TAB COIL 
DOOB SPRING, 
Also the GEM. 



COLUMBIA 

Single and Doable Acting. 



ACORN. 



TOEBEY BOD 
DOOB SPBING. 



FOR PRIOES WRITE 



The Columbian Hardware Co., Makers, Cleveland, onio 

s — u 



GEM WIBE DOOB PULL 



Lamplough & McNaughton 

CANADIAN SALES AGENTS, 

9 De Bresoles Street, MONTREAI 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




LWB"* 



\'Hn -■. nil communications to MONTREAL* 



QUOTE 
LOW. 



TORONTO. 87 VORK ST. 
OTTAWA, 56 QUEEN ST. 



lumbermen's 

Tools — 




J 



SHIP 
QUICK 



PEAVIES, 
CANT HOOKS, 
CANT DOOS. 
PIKE POLES, 
CANT HOOK HANDLES, 
PEAVV HANDLES, 
CANT HOOK PARTS, 
PIKE POLE PARTS. 
PEAVV.PARTS, 






8fe 



•*ING DOGS, 

AIN DOOS, 
LOO CHAIN HOOKS. 
D LINKS, 
TIMBER GRIPS, 
SKIDDING TONGS, 
BOOT CALKS. 
CALK SETS, 
ETC.. ETC. 



LIPSCOMB 

BOOT CALKS, 
BRACES AND 
WRENCHES. 




ORDINARY BOOT CALKS. 



SKIDDING TONGS 



RING DOG 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 






" Something Doing " 

will be the verdict if you are carrying a well-assorted 
line of our "BICYCLE SUNDRIES." 

Our New Catalogue for 1903 will be out on February i, and it will interest you to 
get our prices on... 

Bells, Pumps, Brakes, Spokes, Lamps, 

and everything for the equipment of a Bicycle. 

YOU CANNOT AFFO RD TO BE WITHOUT THEM. 

ACCESSORIES DEPARTMENT: 

Canada Cycle and Motor Co., Limited 

Toronto Junction, Canada. 



* 

•r Branches at : 

WINNIPEG. HAN 
VANCOUVER, B.C 



* 

4 
* 
4 
4 
4 
4 
* 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



> % » #< ^ # * » # » »i» » 4 * •-i* ►#* ^** ^i* ^i* ^i* *-i^ »i- ^j"-* ^i^ »*-• »i* ^i"-* *-i* -i* *-i ; * ^i* *-** •-♦^ *-♦-* •'i^ -i^ *-** *■♦'• •■i^ *•*-* *■'*'* •'i^ *-i-* *-t-* *-$-* *-i* *-*■• *-*■* •-♦* *-*•• *** "i^ 



The P. B. taming Manufacturing Co., 




NO. ZZ. 
No. 33 [double bla/le) is similar in construction anil finish. 



LIMITED. 



Something New! 

THIS is an entirely new style of 
mincing knife of our own design. 
The shank is a flat tinned steel band, 
drawn tightly into a groove encircling 
the handle, the blade being riveted be- 
tween the ends. This construction 
docs away with any hole in the handle, 
which consequently cannot split or 
come loose. The handle itself Is stained 
and shellacked, the whole making the 
neatest and strongest mincing knife 
ever put on the market. 



MADE ONLY BY 



The P. R. Cumming Manufacturing Co., Limited, Clarksburg, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



See! You Don't Have to Pull. 
A Child Can Do It. 




— No 34 






No 15 





rWALHIM 1 fZ. 

ran,, ultra *" 

■ r-m na I I 






Ho. 17 




NO lb 



r» 



Walker's Self=Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel, Nickel Plated, Polished Wood Handles. 
EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED Several Imitation* on the market, but none as good. 
Mfrd. only by ERIE SPECIALTY CO., Erie, Pa., U.S.A. 



RICHARD JOHNSON, CLAPHAM & MORRIS, Li, Manchester 



Caihh Address — "Metallicus," Manchester. 
:i-ABC, AI, Liebers 
and Private Code. 

Manufacturers and 

GALV'D SHEETS 
GALV'D CANADAS 
BLACK SHEET IRON 
BLACK CANADAS 
Range & Furnace SHEETS 

MONTREAL OFFICE : 

Ucm Copland & Co., 

Imperial Buildings. 




WAREHOUSE LEVER STREET 



and LIVERPOOL, ENG. 

Metal Merchants 

TINPLATES, TERNES 
TINNED SHEETS 
PIG TIN, PIG LEAD 
WIRE NETTING 
GALV'D BARB WIRE 



HALIFAX OFFICE: 

Messrs. Grant, Oxley & Co , 
68 Bedford Row. 



NIXON - WINTERBOTTOM, 



Ltd. 




MANUFACTURERS. 



PYRAMID WORKS, 
SHEFFIELD. ENGLAND. 




PYRAMID CUTLERY CJ 
SHtmElD - 



riaterad Trade Mark. 


ESTABLISHED 

1861 


Begiltered Trade Mark. 


TABLE CUTLERY 
BUTCHERS' KNIVES & STEELS 
FARRIERS' KNIVES 


BREAD KNIVES 

PUTTY, PALLETTE, SHOE & 

POTATO KNIVES 


TELEGRAMS 
" PYRAMIDS, 

SHEFFIELD." 



N 

N 

n 




to m 
m 



CO 



Canadian Agents: W. L HALDIMAND & SONS, St. Dizier Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The wrapping paper to use is the 
paper that saves you money. Our 
brown and manilla 

Wrapping Papers 

do this because they do [not 'tear 
easily/thus preventing waste. Every 
order is up to the mark in quality, 
quantity and weight. 

CANADA PAPER CO.. Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TINWARE AND TIN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Heat Cans, 
Jacketed Oil Cans, 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Palls. Ete. 

JAS. A. /WcGOLPIN 

156-162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



TRADE WITH ENGLAND 



Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with the Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The address Is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage, 54.80.) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 
*^k/i«.fl TO-PAY fHerJ, 

^ -St" Gotta At4p s\ii\e- 

— £o-rv<i£e££o-ur. 

DO YOtf? 

ttdirertisemeti t 
«#• in the A* 

1\£CORO, 
To^orJ-ro 

- wit l bring you, 
• Ift^rVJ fenders/ ram th* 

mi*il *• J, lust contractor* 

Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 




FREE INSURANCE AGAINST FIRE 




the BEST 



THE MOST COMPLETE STOCK 




In Sheets, Tubes, Wire and Rod. 



Service Right, 
Quality Right, Prices Right 



WATERBURY BRASS GO. 

122 to 130 Centre St., New Vork City. 



Always have our classified Stuck 
List before you. 

YOURS FOR THE ASKING.. 



THE C. G. YOUNG CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

AND SUPPLIES 
No. I Adelaide Street East Toronto 



GLUE 



The sticking 
kind. The best 
only is manufac- 
tured by us. 



Write for quotatons. 



W. Harris & Co., d T oro: 



Ave., 
TO 



WILLIAM ABBOTT 

Representing Jonas & Colver's Celebrated "Novo" 
Air Hardening Steel. Especially adapted for high 
speed and for all classes of tools and work. Easily 
annealed, for shaping into Milling Cutters, Dies 
and other tools. Stock on hand for immediate 
orders. 

Office and Sample Room, 13 St. John Street, 

M01NTREAL. 



AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY TOWN. 



Plaster 



Fire Proof 
Frost » 
Sound " 
Will not crAck. 




Success and the "J.M.T." trade 
mark are synonymous 



Plumbing equipment bearing the "J.M.T." trade mark is branded as the best. 
Included in our line are many specialties of which we have exclusive control. 
Specialties which are far in advance of any other line. In this line is the "Morrison" Low- 
Tank Closet Combination. 

The noiseless emptying valve is its superior point, while its compactness and genera' neat 
appearance comb'ne to make it the most attractive and best low-tank closet combination on the 
market. 

Let us quote you prices when you need anything in the line of "superior" bathroom ~ 



The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited, Toronto. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

Rn DN/ACC J? r*f\ PORT TALBOT, SOUTH WALES, 
. D. O T MOO QL UU.y GREAT BRITAIN. 

Largest MAKERS OF 

BEST SIEMENS STAMPING ENAMELLING 

BLACK PLATES, 

CIRCLES. RECTANGLES. Etc 

MAKERS of all descriptions of STEEL SHEETS. 
Brands SKER, and SKER BEST. 

Solo Canadian Export Agents, 

ROBERT CROOKS & CO., Botolph House, 10, Eastcheap, LONDON, EC. 



Cable address : " CROLLO." LONDON. 



IT PAYS TO INVEST 



IN OUR ORNAMENTAL 



Office Railings, Fences, Grills, 
Fire Dogs, Etc. 







Because they are 



Inexpensive 
Reliable 
Ornamenta I 
Non-Tarnishable. 



Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 
Head Office: TORONTO, ONT. 

DISTRICT OFFI< 

Montreal. Winnipeg, Halifax Dttawa. \.m ra 



j Start the New Year Bright and Light. 

Install LUXFER PRISMS and make Business Easy. 
We manufacture and deal in all kinds of ^ 

GLASS FOR 
STORE FRONTS 

and INTERIORS 
Will make suggestions valuable to your customers. Discount to Trade. 

Luxfer Prism Co., Limited 

lOO tting Street West TORONTO. 



, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 





The Value of Annealing. 



Annealing is the most costly step of mantle 
making — consequently a cheap mantle cannot be 
properly annealed — That is the reason a cheap 
mantle caves in like this 
if you lay it on its side, 
after burning off the coat- 
ing— Try one — They injure your trade. 

Mantles branded A are thoroughly annea- 
led over pressure gas f\ — — They fit the burner 
—They don't shrink — They 
stand up this way — They are rg _i 
reliable— They help your trade. ^^_^ 
— We are the sole manufacturers of A mantles. 
— Write us if you are interested. /I — 

Lowest prices on Mantles, Shades, 
Chimneys, Globes and Sundries* 



\ 



ii 




II 



Clipper, 



PATENTED I8TA. 



AlIER LIGHT CO., MONTREAL. 




The King of 
Centre-Adjustment 

Clippers 

still remains 

unsurpassed 

after a run of nearly 

THIRTY YEARS 




The Improved 

B. PATTERN 
" NEWMARKET " 

may now be obtained 
from all jobbers. 

Detachable Plates. 

Improved Cap with 
Long Bearing. 

Rigidity and Easy 

Running. 

Accurately Machined 
and Perfeotly Fitted. 

All Parts Interchangeable, 



MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



BURMAN & SONS, LIMITED 

BIRMINGHAM, E NGLAND - 



Supplies for the Maple Syrup Season. 



Sap Buckets . 




-EXTRA DEEP AND STRAIGHT. 
—THREE SIZES. 

They possess many advantages over the ordinary 
flaring Buckets — being small in diameter they do not 
catch the rain or snow, and as they are very deep, 
they hang perpendicularly, and consequently will 
rot overflow until full. 

— Covers supplied if required. 

— They nest close fjr shipping or storing. 

We can also supply the ordinary Flaring or 
Western Sap Palls. 



E. T. Sap Spouts. 

MADE OF RETINNED STeEL-STRONfl AND DURABLE. 

Only require a ^-in. hole in tree. 

It does not cover the inside surface of the hole ; therefore 

larger amount of sap is obtained. 

Packed in card-board boxes. 




Maple Leaf 

Sap Spouts. 




Made in Bronzed Steel. 

Require a K-in. hole. 

Has a shoulder which prevents it being 
driven in too far. 

The hole in the tree is not exposed to wind 
and snow ; consequently, sap will flow longer. 

Packed in card-board boxes. 




Syrup Cans, round or square. 

Plain or decorated. Made in y t , % , and i gallon sizes. 

Either Wine or Imperial Measure. 

A full stock carried In all lines ; orders shipped promptly. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 



TORONTO, CANADA. 





VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 24, 1903. 



NO. 4. 



President : 

JOHN BAYNS MacLBAN. 

Montreal. 

,he MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

on i 

MONTREAL - - - 332 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

TORONTO - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

ION. ENG. - - 109 Fleet Street, E.C. 
W. H, Miln. 

Manchester, Eng. - - 18 St. Ann street. 

U.S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG - - - Western Canada Block. 

J.J. Roberts. 

ON, ONT. - - - Hiscox Building. 
Walter H. 1 ,ind-a\ . 

ST. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
NEW YORK - Room 8o--> New York Life Bldg. 

\V T. Robson. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 

1. real Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 

„ . . ... I Adscript, London. 

Cable Address j Adscri £, Can;lJa . 



LOWER PRICES ON WIRE. 

REDUCTIONS in barb and galvan- 
ized wire an; reported this week. 
The base price ol barb wire is now 
from Cleveland, a reduction 
of IStfc, though the price of carlots 
is onlj lowered 1 « »>. . , the quotation 
now being S-j. i">. From stock, Toronto. 
the price is $2.80, a decline of 20c. Three 
numbers of galvanized wire, Noss. 9, IS 
and IS, show reductions of IV.. tin' prices 
being : No. '.', $2.50 : No. 12, $2.1 N 
$2.75. 
The cause of the reduction is the compe- 
tition of Get m. in win-, which has been selling 
somewhat freely, aboul 5 per cent, ol lasl 



year's total consumption of wire in Car 
having come from Europe. Toronto jobbers 
state that it isgenerallj conceded thai wire 
produced in Montreal 01 v. leveland reaches 
the consumer in much better shape than 
does the wire which lias had to cross the 

W\i± salt-wale, pond. Yet the price made 
a demand for ii and an attempt is being 
made to satisfy the entire Canadian 
market with Montreal 01 Cleveland 
wire, hence the reduction. 



active part in the affairs ol Ins own busi- 
ness, the commercial ihterests <>f ih< 
country as well as the affairs ol Stan will 
lose bj his departun 



THE LATE SENATOR WOOD 

NO death in Canada o\ recent years, 
among the ranks ol business men, 
has probably excited SO much interest and 
regret as the demise o\ Senatoi Wood of 

Hamilton. 

We believe, with on<: exception, that his 
active interesl in the hardware trade 
extended over a larger number of years 
than an} other man in it, while the firm 
o( which he was the honored head is 
known far and wide throughout ihe 

countrj . 

Ihii aside altogethci from his long 
sevice and the importance ol the firm with 
which lie was connected he possessed a 
genial and striking personality that 
brought him into prominence in public as 
well as in commercial lite. 

While in the House o\ Commons, .mJ 
later as a member o\ the Senate, he 
applied to the allairs of State the business 
principles which tor oyer half a century 

had been the foundation o\ his success in 

commercial life. He is gone. And while 
he has nut foi some years taken .1 ver\ 



A SCARCITY OF COKE 

r I A H E effect ol' the coal - 1 1 i l< <. is now 
i. being felt in Canada in .1 new way. 
The output of eoke has been curtailed ow- 
ing to the heavy demand for soft coal foi 
fuel. \s a result of this the blast lurn.ui 
al Hamilton has been compelled to reduce 
its output, On Friday last the following 

letter was sent out In Ihe Hamilton Steel 

andiron Co., Limited, to some o( the 

largest pun hasers ol pii^ iron : 

We regret t > advise von that, owing to the 
cully we are experiencing in getting coke forward 
we have been obliged to ilow down our blast fur- 
nace, which, of conrse, m.-.in^ ,1 reduction in our 
product. We are putting forth > to gel 

the railway companies and the coke comp.e 
ship the coke, but so far the measure of.oursnc- 

i> been smi'l We notify vou astothfa 
dition ofafl 1 1 may wish to procure 

•1 elsewhere in order !■> ensure 

any stoppage at your works 

' This is more serious than one might 
think," said the manager of oik o\ the 
largest foundries in Canada to Hardwari 
and Mi 1 vi . "The blast furnaces are now 
sold months ahead o\ their output, and a 
stoppage of such .1 furnace so important 
to Ontario founders might mean that 
than oiii: foundrv or machine shop in the 
Province would be much em ban 
not compelled to shut down." 

How serious the situation >\<.t\ be, will, 
OUrse, depend on future developments 
which will be followed wilh .111 inl 

almost akin to an \ 



Hmrdmarr mmd Mtinl 



KlHTolMAL 



BUSINESS MEN IN UNIVERSITY AFFAIRS. 



M ' i . 1 1 I INHIKMH rtiRUNTU UNI VERS1TY. 

1 3irW.II Meredith 

Minister <>f Education 
Hon « has i 
Sir W. I ' Km Janes Loudon, M v 

Maurice Hutton, M v 
I'. V John Hostrin, K ( 

Bi i N Burwash, M \ 
iek Oauli Rei .1 1! Teefy, H k 

\j\ blbakL Eei .1 P. Bheratoa, M A 
M \ D.< 1 1) D 

B \ B ( L Rei H 1 a»en, l> l> 

H Ramsay Wright, M \ 
William i V 01 Borne, B St 
K ( M G B A Reeve, B.A.. M l> 

1. .nil, M \ . C R, 
r, k C Hon Edward Blake, M A . 

\i l> K.C., M r 

Principal W Peterson, M A . l-arratt W. Smith, K.C. 
C.M.G Hon. sir Win. Htdoek, K C 

M G . MA , K.C., Ml' 

H W rang, H S 

A. Kirs.hniann. Ph.l>. 

\ 11 K Lefroy, \i a 

\ MoPhedran, MB 

A Primrose, M B., C M 

Rei K J. (i X.-ill 

.1 J. Oasaidy, M D 

Hoi, s h Blake, B \ 

X. W. Hoyles, HA 

Rer. J. Ballantyne, B-A 

if M ( lark, Esq . k C 

A .1 B.-ll. B.A., Ph.D. 

.1 Squair, B.A. 

/. v Lash, K C 

D. J G Wishart, B A , M.D., 

C M 
\V Oldright. M A Jill 

Rev \V P. Djer, M V . l> n 

.1 Mills. MA 

J. B. Wilhnott. D.D.S..H.D.S. 

\V H Ellis. MA. MB 

F. H Torrington, Mus Doc 

c s Heebaer, Phm.B. 

A Smith. K.R.C.V.S. 

A Baker, MA. 

W. Dale. MA 

Hon Hir J A Boyd, M A . 

I.I, 1) 
\ B Aylesworth, M A 
.1 Chiaholm, B.A. 
.1 1. Macdougall, MA, 

C.M.G. 
A B. Macallum, M A . U B . 

Pn H 
.1 II Coyne, DA 
W Houston, MA. 
W. .1 Loudon, B.A. 

1 '. Snider, B.A. 
.J King, MA 

A H Reynar, MA 
A K. Bain. MA 
.1 .1 kfaclaren, M I 
\ Carman, M A . D.D. 
K C Colbeck, B a 
W. K Riddell, B A . 1,1, D 
Ho,, W P I! Street, I.I- B 
H II II Aikins. M 1> 

I 11 Cameron, H B 

.1 M McCaUum, B.A., M.D 
A H Wright, B A . Ml) 
C H Mil, h.ll. C B 
J. Henderson, M \ 

II I Sti mgi B \ 

THERE is a storm gathering in On- 
tario, chiefly among business men, 
over Provincial University affairs. It is 
growing slowly, but it is coming. 

The Province lias contributed liberal]) 
to the financial support of the apex of its 
much-vaunted educational system, and it 
has sent from every county the young men 

no COUOtrj in the world lias ever pro- 
duced better raw material to be moulded 



into greal citizens. Instead, it has turned 
out indifferent lawyers, doctors and clergy- 
men by the do/en. 

The results have been mosl disappoint- 
ing , and ii is the fault of the system, and 
the system is due to the inferior adminis- 
tration. 

On the other hand, McGill, the leading 
Quebec university, is doing such good, 
practical work for the students handed 
over to her charge that Toronto citizens 
some of them identified with Toronto Uni- 
versity -are actually sending their sons to 
Montreal to be 1 rained. Graduates of 
Toronto University often have difficulty 
in getting a start in life: recently, ever) 
engineering student in McGill University 
had an offer of a place long before he 
graduated. 

Compare the governing bodies of both 
institutions in the parallel columns above. 
This is the direct explanation. A similar 
comparison of the teaching staffs is the 
indirect, for they are selected by the gover- 
nors. One is a committee of giants 
most of them men with world-wide reputa- 
tions ; great men ; men who have accom- 
plished great things. The other has a few- 
men who are undoubtedly leaders in their 
special fields, but the majority have never 
made mark enough in anything to be en- 
trusted with a scheme for training the 
greatest asset Canada has, and there is not 
one business man in the whole body. 

Toronto University is run by clergymen, 
doctors, lawyers and musicians. The 
whole aim is to lay out a course to train 
men for these professions and the country 
is overrun with them. 

Canada has developed in the last few 
years from a colony to a nation to be 
reckoned with in the commercial affairs of 
the world. We must not only hold a place, 
but we must aim to lead. We can only 
lead by thoroughly educating our young 
men in the most practical way. We are 
now tar behind many other countries in 
this respect, and it is only by the natural 
intelligence of our people that we have 
progressed so far. 

While a comparison is made with Mc- 
Gill College.it is not for the purpose .if ex- 
|ii 



citing unfriendly rivalry, but to show 

Ontario, from an example at her doors, 
what progress is being made. McGill is 
far in advance of Toronto, but she has 
still much to do in some respects before 
she comes into the company of some of 
the United States and European colleges. 
Hut with her great resources and her 
broad-minded, able Principal she should 
soon hold her own with an) college in the 
world. 

The time will come before long when 
the interests of Canada will demand an 
understanding between all our colleges to 
prevent a certain amount of overlapping 
and for doing more effective work. 



A PLAN THAT FAILED. 

''T'MIK profit-sharing system of doing 

JL business has many advocates, as 
indeed have all plans of conducting busi- 
ness in which employers and employes 
have a financial interest in the firm or 
company. Hut, perhaps, of them all, that 
wherein the stock is given to the employes 
or where (he year's profits are shared and 
used to buy their stock in the company 
has the least chance of bepomming suc- 
cessful. The object of all such methods, 
apart from the philanthropic motives which 
may guide some employers, is to inspire 
in the workers that same desire for the 
company's success as exists in the minds 
and hearts of the proprietors. Hut this 
result is not likely to be assured where 
the stock is given instead of being sold to 
the employe. In the latter case he lias a 
direct interest in getting value for monev 
invested, just as has the employer. 

A case where the profit-sharing system 
failed was that of The American Window 
Glass Co., of Pittsburg. In 1900, 5,000 
shares of the common stock of the com- 
pany were 10 be given lo the workmen's 
association. The men did not have to in- 
vest any money. They were to have repre- 
sentation on the board, and the stock was 
to be paid fov out of the dividends. It was 
turned over lo the workmen in this way at 
$30 a share. In return for this the work- 
men were lo give nothing but their lull 
attention to the work, with a view to 
furthering the business of I he company. 

In spile of this, out of the I, TOD pots 
which was the capacity of (he company's 
factories, only 1,000 were operated, owing 
10 the fact that the workmen did not sup- 
plv skilled labor, and the company had lo 
withdraw iis profit-sharing plan. 



I hi h >i:i \l 



//.* rrfci an amti \ft t.it 



THE DEPRESSION IN QERMANY. 

II i- practical I) impossible to sustain an 
industr) undei the strain of unnatural 
conditions. A better illustration of this 
would hard 1 5 be found than is given bj 
the condition of the iron and steel indus- 
tries of German) to-day, is evidenced bj 
the following From Kuhlow's German 
Trade Ki \ iew . Berlin : 

In tin- Iron and Steel [Tades of German) matters 
up to now bave continued to prog bad to 

worst, and a feeling of despondence 

;<>mnnvt those best competent to judge 

prospects in tin ne.ir future The more sanguine 

look foi later on, hut few expect tint an) 

H-. U Improveraenl will b I until pools and 

syndicates are done away with and prices come to 
gulated in .1 nature] way. At present ( terman 
consuni.is .in- paying art i tic.illy liigli prices, while 
illy low ones are qui' port, and a 

striking instance of the extl I which this 

price policy has reached was afforded in a state- 
ment pist made at a meeting of Rhine Westphalian 
Holler works. A resolution was adopted by these 
manufacturers asserting that the existing difficult 
plight of their industry was intensified by the fact 
that the export price of German plates and pipes 
for boilers is so low that the\ can be shipped 
abroad, reimported, and transported into the 
ol tlei many at a lower cost than by pur- 
chasing them direct from the rolling mills. 
The latest reports from Rhenish- Westphali 

.: the feeling in the trade as one of growing 
uncertainty The home consumption of crude 
iron is diminishing, and sales are made under 
harder conditions The wire trade is described as 
suffering especially from low prices at home and 
growing competition abroad On the other hand, 
building operations have kept up well during the 
autumn, and this has created a steady demand for 
girders and other structural forms of steel, Even 
in this department, however, dealers are now- 
slow to to place orders, as they expect lower prices. 

German iron and steel manufacturers, in 
their desire to prevent the demoralization 
threatened their industries b) tin- depres- 
sion prevailing in that countrj during the 
lasl yearortwo, organized a large svmli- 
cate or pool io control prices on tin- home 
market and tor export. The) argued thai 
if the) could export a large enough pro- 
portion of their production the) could 
maintain prices at home, so they contri- 
buted to a fund out of which a liberal 
bonus is paid lor ever) ton of their lines 
exported. The result has been as mani- 
fested in the extract above, prices were 
raised at home and lowered foi export. 
Owing to tin- depression, the demand for 
iron and steel materials became reduced 
as prices advanced. Hiena large propor- 
tion had to be exported, m' prices were 
again lowered, and an attempt to recoup 
this loss was made b) further enhancement 
of values on the home market. The ulti- 



mate 1 1 miIi is i In- ubsui d i ondil ions 
noted, and Kuhlow's IVnde Review, an 
organ of the manufacturing interests of 
tin- country, now sav- thai pools and 
syndicates musl hi- done awaj with. 

HAVE ATTENDED TO BUSINESS. 

SIM a l l. \ l ION is altogether to,, ni, 
among business men, especiall) in 
the cities, throughout Canada to-day. It 
is, therefore, refreshing to read the follow- 
ing statement from Mi. Wm. Murray, Van- 
couver, manager of tin- Canadian Bank of 
Commei i 

\ an ver to-day |> .ur ol solidity it 

never had before. Men of sound business prin- 
ciples are at the head of (he business institutions of 
the city The whole-ale as well as the retail 
ol lilt- city is in exceptionally tine shape Business 
men during the past twelve months have been at 
tending stiictly to the management ol their various 
I outside speculation severe- 
ly alone, with a result which has been greatly bene- 
ficial td them individually, and also to the com- 
munity. Real estate shows a health) condition, 
and while many turnovers have been made within 
the past eight months, it is most gratifying to note 
that properly purchasers have proved builders, and 
not much land is moving for the purposes of specu- 
lation 

Vancouver is to be congratulated, in 
the firsl place that its business men have 
realized that the) will make the best per- 
manent progress b) concentrating their 
energies on their own business, enterprises; 
and in the second place that the land of 
the city is going into the hands of pro- 
gressive business nun rather than into the 
grip of those who would hold it for the 
rise- in values due to the improvement of 
adjacent properties. 



is abundant room foi a branch bank 
>h. ,■ 

A stud) oi these conditions will readil) 
convince one that there i* much truth in 
the arguments advanced b) the ' knight 
of the Grip." I ii an) i ase the mat' 
worth) oi tin attention H some <•! out 
essive iin.in. i.d institutions. 



BANK BRANCH WANTED 

" II vi.-nw VRH v\n Mil \l would t.\o a 
good turn to many business men," said a 

wide-awake traveller the other day, "if it 
would suggest to some of those new banks 
(he advisabilit) of establishing a branch 
hank ai Cardinal, Out. The chartered 

hank nearest to thai (own is at Pre rCOtt, 
I J miles away to the West. The nearest 
on the east i- Morrisburg, 15 miles dis- 
tant, though there is a private hank at 
Iroquois. On the north there is noiw 

nearer than Kemptville, too fat awa\ to 
be considered. You i.m readil) set 
thai as Cardinal is a progressive village, 
a> The Edwardsburg Starch Co. h 

pay-roll, and as there is an excellent 
farming countn about the place, thai (here 
II 



T 



BRIGHT PROSPECTS FOR BICYCLES. 
[ "M 1 1 future "i tin bit ycle 'i adi 

now safel) he said Io be as-iiud as 

the- prospects wen- never brighter than 

the) appear lo-dav . 

Ii is interesting to know that this i- no) 
the booming of a tad, hut the demand of a 
staph- article, as it is now an acknow- 
ledged fail that the bicycle is not onlv a 

iniessii\ and a great convenience, but a 
health) pastime. This is thorough!) real- 
ized in Canada, England and Australia at 
tin- present time judging from the number 

of orders thai are being taken b) the lead- 
in- firm cl bicycle manufactures in ( tnada 
and from the busy appearance "I their 
factory, 

The falling oil" in the bicycle' business 
was principall) attributed to the introduc- 
ing of various outside amusements, 
whereas, perhaps, if the truth were 
known, the chief reason for this was 

the la i i that manufacturers of bicycles 
and bicycle sundries discontinued adver- 
tising. 

It is quite evident that they realize this 
fact now judi^ini; from the attractive ad- 
vertising that is being done throughout 
Canada at the present time, and we under- 
stand that the polic) of advertising in the 
different forms will be followed out quite 
extensive!) during the romiiig season. 
Agents and dealers are beginning to 

realize the benefits to hi- derived therefrom 

as indicated b) the order- a I read) received 
tor bicycles and bicycle sundries. Added 
to this the fait that the business is now in 
the hands of responlihle dealers assures a 

bright outlook for the coming season 

Hardware men throughout the countn 
are beginning to realize thai bicycle sun- 
dries are in their line and a will assorted 
stock is almost a necessity and will prove 
profitable. 

We believe the Coming m-,immi will - 
return of the good old wheeling davs, and 

that we will sit- strings of bicycles on the 
loads ridden by pleasure and health- 
seekers. This means thai the own. 
wheels will soon he looking them on' 
giving them a general overhauling when. 
perhaps, a new pair of pedals, grips ot 
handlebars will he needed. And to-daj 
the) will look foi 'It i I Ill- 

hardware StOl 



//iiri/.-i uri' iihi/ M,-I.il 



k 



COMMENT ON CURRENT 

TOPICS 



* 



DOCTORS ni Toronto are prescribing 
anthracite coal for some of their 
patients, claiming that bituminous 
1- injurious to i ht-i i health. This is sure 
l\ a new departure in medical i ractibe. 

• • • 

The British Bag was hauled down the 
other day by the Board of Governors of 
the Cork Lunatic Asylum. It is to be 
hoped the acl will not be taken seriously 
bj the British Government. One can 
never tall what impulse will lead people 
in asylums to il". 

# * * 

Toronto is >till wrestling with the 
smoke-nuisance question, and a few days 
ago th« Hoard of Control passed over to 
the lender merries of the Legislation and 
Reception Committee the bylaw which is 
designed to govern the nuisance. Whether 
ii will, like its predecessors, go up in 
smoke, remains to be seen. 

* * » 

It beats everything the way ambitious 
towns in Ontario are scrambling after 
b<-.-t sugar factories. 

# * # 

Toronto's new City Council is still in- 
flated with the gas-ownership idea. 

• * • 

In New York beans 'are being used as 
fuel and in Toronto as a substitute for 
potatoes. Varied, evidently, is the utility 
of the white bean. 

« * * 
I i- Bling and millions of people on 
this democratic continent are elbowing 
each other to make obeisance to him. 
» » » 
In coal we ha\e a subject for recipro- 
city, as well as an article for fuel. 

* * » 

'I'll ■ public have not yet been enticed 
back to the speculative stock market. It 
18 fortunate. He who ventures into the 
speculative market is always in danger 
of being tossed by the "bulls" or squeez- 
ed by the 'bear-." 

* * » 

Canada's trade is growing by leaps and 
bounds, and the leaps and bounds do not 
appear to be overstrained, either. 

* * * 

\t the annual banquet of the Brant- 
ford Board of Trade the other night, 
J. I. Tarte declared that Canada 
had reached a solemn n her his 

tory. She ha--, and Mr. Tarte is a living 
example. The Premier took hi.- speeches 



seriously and compelled him to resign his 
portfolio in the Cabinet. 



* # # 



Hon. Joseph Chamberlain, whose pres- 
ence in South Africa is creating so much 
interest, was once in the screw -manufac- 
turing business, which possibly accounts 
for the fact that he is able to " screw 
up " so much courage. 

* # * 

Marconi would save a great deal of 
time in crossing and recrossing the At- 
lantic if he could utilize his wireless sys- 
tem for transportation purposes. 

* # # 

The duty on lead is naturally a weighty 

subject. 

* * * 

The physical health of Alfred Beit, the 
South-African millionaire, appears to be 
the very antithesis of his financial ■ ondi- 
tion. Possibly he would be glad to ex- 
change with those of us with whom the 
conditions are the reverse. 

* * * 

The two political parties in Ontario 
have lately so effectually painted each 
other black that the independent specta- 
tor must have arrived at the conclusion 
that there are two of a kind. There is 
one thing, however, for the good name of 
the country : Neither of them are as 
black as they are painted. 

* # » 

A letter to The London Times, says 
that the movement for taking settlers 
from Great Britain to Canada is assum- 
ing national proportions. This is a mat- 
ter for congratulation. Hitherto the 
" national proportions " have been of the 
opposite description. 

« * # 

Lord Charles Beresford, who is now on 
a visit to this continent, has established 
his reputation as a good fighter ; but he 
talks too much to be considered a good 

talker. 

* * * 

- eden is to have a match combina- 
tion, a syndicate of five companies hav- 
"iirchased the majority of the shares 
in 'The Vulcan Company, the output 
of which has amounted to about one- 
fourth of the total production of mat- 
ches in Sweden. We may now confidently 
look for less friction, and, consequently, 

ter safety. 

* » # 

line- of the immigration commissioners 
is of the opinion that the export of bar- 

L2 



ley to Great Britain will prove profitable. 
Ten or twelve years ago the whole coun- 
try thought that. The United States had 
put a prohibitory duty on Canadian bar- 
ley, and our export trade to that coun- 
try shrank from important to insignifi- 
cant proportions. We weie to be recom- 
pensed by growing two rowed barley and 
selling it in Great Britain. But our at- 
tempts proved abortive, and to some ex- 
tent, at least, on account of the penchant 
of too many shippers to mix the two- 
rowed with other descriptions of barley. 
And to da\ out export barley trade is 95 
per cent, smaller than it was when the 
McKinley tariff was raised up against it. 
We are not, however, scarcely as bad as 
those without hope, for last year we sent 
345,936 bushels of barley to Great Brit- 
ain, whereas 11 years ago the quantity 
was only 27,132 bushels. But, then, 11 
years ago we sent nearly 10,000,000 bush- 
els to the United States, while the sum 
total of last year was but 17,161 bush- 
els. 

# # # 

Another Conservative Senator has pass- 
ed away. Five years ago the Govern- 
ment supporters in the Senate were in 
what appeared to be a hopeless minority; 
now they have a substantial " working 
majority." Death seems to be more par- 
tial to the Liberal Government at Otta- 
wa than the electors are to the Con 

servative Opposition in Ontario. 

* * * 

With coal extraordinarily high in price, 
and with the temperature unpleasantly 
low, one has good reason for believing 
that King Coal and Jack Frost are 
working in harmony to the discomfort 

of consumers. 

• * # 

The price of gas has been reduced 10c. 
per 1,000 feet in Toronto. But ways and 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 

Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



means have yet to be devised to reduce 

the ''"-' "' al'l'l 1 1 1 -■ l 1 1 I ■ I'll- ill the ••Min-rll 

Oitj " 

• • • 

l in Monroe Dooti ine, intei e t in whi l» 

.iiu being revived on etooounl nf (he 
Venezuelan difficulty, was 7'.' yean « > 1« i 

month. Like nearly all dootrinwj 
political a-* well a I ha ra 

dergone sunn- fundamental ohanges as a 
result of the machination ol heterodoa 

politicians, " With ii listing colonies 

or dependencies ol anj European Power, 
we have not interferred and shall not in 
terfen himI one of the clauses iu 

President Mob aundating 

the Doctrine Phe clauses which werede- 

I to restrain tin' IDited States are 
no longer allowed to '1<> duty ; it is only 
those clauses that were de igned to keep 

n. vuit .mi the nation-, oi Etarope thai 
are now considered orthodox. 

# • • 

Canning's name has often been associ-. 
ated with the Monroe Doctrine. It is 
true that he suggested to the United 
States Embassador the principles which 
were afterwards laid down in the famous 
i Pn idenl Uonroi But his 
expressed idea was that (Jreat Britain 
and ih" I oited States should jointly 
promulgate the Doctrine that any at- 
tempt oi tin- four Kuropean continental 
Powers compo ing the " Holj Alliance." 
to destroy the independence of the new 
South Vmerican Republics, would be con- 
Bidered a cause for united action on the 
part of the two countries. In President 
M mroe's Cabinet there was ;i t Erst a de- 
tion to fall in with the 
views of Canning. The views of .Jeffer- 
son and Madison, both of whom had 
previously occupied the presidential 
chair, were equally favorable. But .John 
Quincy Adam 3 tary of State in 
Monroe's Cabii strongly op] 

i-operation with Greal Britain and 
finally persuaded a majority ol his con- 
to adopt his view. Ami the mess- 
which Monroe afterwards submitted 
was actually drawn up by 

Ml \ I LlllS. 

• • • 

There is nothing surprising in the 
results shown in the last report ol E. 
w 'oil. '• i o Limited. Baking powder 
and ■ >it to mi • business. 

HOCKEY GAMES IN MONTREAL. 
Lewis Bros. Si Co.'s hockcv U'.tm de" 

rented the G.N.W. and C.P.R. team by a 
Mi'u of 5 to 1 on Monday night. 

following is a result o\ the games 
played l\\ The Canada Paint Co. so fai 

llii^ season : Dominion Button Co., draw, 

l' 2; Union Bank, draw, l I; Northern 
Electric Co., .' l in favor of The Canada 
Paint Co. They now lead the manufac- 
turers' league. 



Just as good as the S. W. Paints 

We make just as yood varnishes as we do paints. Like our 
paints, they are just as good for each purpose as can he DO 

THE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS VARISISHES 

can be depended upon to give the very best results. They are 
right — always. 

We use only high grade materials — the materials that tend 
to produce durability. 

We employ the most approved methods of manufacture — the 
methods that bring easy working, proper flowing, and drying 
qualities. 

We give minute attention to detail. It is the careful after- 
aging and careful watching of the small details which turn out a 
varnish always the same — an article that will always give good 
results. 

We are conducting our varnish business on the same basis 
that proved so successful in our paint industry, offering for each 
use a varnish which we are satisfied is best suited for that use. 

If you believe in good varnishes — varnishes that are good to 
sell and good to use, write today for prices and further informa- 
tion. 



\Jhe Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

NEWARK, SAN FRANCISCO. MONTREAL. 

BOSTON. LOS ANOELES. TORONTO. 

KANSAS CITY. MINNEAPOLIS. WINNIPEG. 





CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 
OUH ERROR. 

1 \ f E are sorry to notice that last week 

\ \ when refering to catalogue " B," 

issued In the Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, 

Out., we spoke of it as a " trade calendar." 
As this catalogue covets many lines thai 
hardwaremen are particularly interested in 
we rectify the error so that the trade may 
not neglect to secure a copy ol such a use- 
full work. 

I \r vssms ami rOGGl l BOl Is. 

The Seward and Romsine Manufactur- 
ing Co., Philadelphia, Pa., have issued a 

skeleton catalogue for 1903, tail's; a brief 
but well illustrated outline o( the patent 
single and double expansion and toggle 
holts which the\ are placing on the market 
this year. The reputation oi the lines 
made In this firm, bolts, star drills, cap 
and bonnet nuts, special brass and iron 
bolts of all kinds, is so hijjdi and so well 
established that the trade, to keep in touch 
with this up-to-date line ol goods, will 
find it advisable to write for a COpy of this 



Catalogue, which will be sent to all readers 

o\ Hardware and Metal. 

u l INOI I l B CBMBN I ROOFING. 

There is no lest of quality like the test 
ol time. There is, therefore, strong argu- 
ment in the claim that as Actinolite cement 

roofs have stood the strain ,<i Canada's 
cold winters and hot summers for over 
20 years, and has necessitated no 
repairs in that time, the article must be 

particular!) \aluable for this purpose. 
One ol the neatest booklets received In 

Hardware v\n Mmi for mam weeks 

was sent to Us this week In Joseph James. 

Actinolite, Out., manufacturer of the pro- 
duct. This booklet gives full information 
regarding the nature ot and the usi 

which this material c.u\ be put, and also 
contains several letters from parlies who 
have used it and commend il in. 
ously. The Paterson Manufacturing Co 
are agents for this material in toronto, 
and A. Mi Arthur & i. o. for ii in Montreal. 
Readers of HaRDWARI vm> Mi ,, K . IU 
tfet these booklets on application. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



AMUSEMENT STAMPS IN WINDSOR 

rp in- Windsor, Ont., branch of the 

Retail Men lia I \ sociation ol 

Canada, held their regular monthly 

16 Opera Block, 

on Januarj 15. There wtis a large 

line ol business in the 

City " being nted. 

principal topic >>f discussion was the 

failure of the efiorts <>f the Association 

ave the bj lav* regarding the use oi 

trading stamps enforced. The by-law, 

which is a verbatum copy of tin- Toronto 

.. was passed l>> the city council in 

June last, at which time The Dominion 

Trading Stamp Company was doing a 

rusliing business in Windsor. Although 

the by-lav. <li<l not come into force until 

three months after the date of its pass 

the above-named company pullet) 

stakes and was out <>f the city within a 

week. 

Soon after The Trading Stamp Com- 
pany quit here, a concern, which flour- 
ishes in Detroit, called The Amusement 
Stamp Company, introduced their busi- 
in Windsor. This scheme is worked 
on precisely the same lines as the trad- 
ing Stamps, with the addition of the 
privilege of buying ferryboat tickets and 
admission to the theatres and eheap 
shows in Detroit with the stamps. 

A iii in of grocers were induced to handle 
these stamps and resigned from member- 
ship in the Association for that purpose. 
War has been waged for the last three 
months against this linn, but through 
the apathy and opposition of the police 
department, the Association, up till now, 
have been unable to have the by-law en- 
forced sgainai this Dim. It came out at 
the meeting that the city solicitor had 
given a" opinion that the by-law was de- 
fect ive and would not reach the firm, 
they having resorted to a subteifuge in 
the shape of a stamped announcement on 
the books containing the stamps that 

they would redeem them in cash at their 

store. 

Some <>f the members at the meeting 
wauled to let the matter drop, but Secre- 
tary Davis, of the Windsor branch, who 
i^ 2nd vice-president of tie Association, 
said "No I am a Briton and conse- 
quently .. and this thing is going 
to be fought out if it lakes all .summer," 
and so the merry wai goes on. 

The committee appointed at the -Di 
ber meeting to arrange for the annual 
At Home, asked foi further time to re 
port, which w a- granted. 

Hon. President Geo. II. Nairn, piesident 
of the Grocers' Section, called for a short 
..!! of tie after the adjourn 

ment <>i the general meeting, which was 
held, and some important business trans- 
acted. 

The plumber- and hardware dealei 
pect to have a section formed during the 
present month, and the druggists will 
likeK follow in the m at future. 



IVER JOHNSON REVOLVERS 

ARE ABSOLUTELY SAFE. 



ACCIDENTAL 
DISCHARGE 
IS 
IMPOSSIBLE. 



WHAT MORE 
COULD 
BE SAID? 




Send for recently published catalogue. 



SAFETY HAMMER AUTOMATIC. 



IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



New York Office : 99 Chambers St. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 




Page Acme Poultry Netting 

A bird cannot fly through as small a hole as it can 
crawl through, so Page Poultry Netting is made with 
small meshes at bottom and large at top. No. 12 gauge 
wire top and bottom— no sag. Get Page fences and 
gates— they're best. 

8 The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 
Montreal, P.Q., and St. John, N.B. 8 



ALABASTINE. 




ALABASTINE lias been on the m-.rket for more than twenty years, and is known n be reliable. Is ihotoughly 
: dvertised, and in demand. To tell anything else for coating walls, it must necessarily be on the rccommendacion that 
it is the s: me thing, or just as good as Alabastlne. 

ALABASTINE is ready for use by the addition of cold water, made so by the inventor, Mr. M. B. Church, who 
was the first to produce a cold-water preparation that is thorough'y practical, that has superseded all hot-water mix- 
tures and forced other manufacturers to undertake the use of the cold water process, which process is protected by 
Canadian Letters Patent. 

ALABASTINE haidens with 'age, and r<peated coats may be added from lime to time without the necessity of 
removing old coats when desired to renew Tl.is effects a great saving to the user. 

ALABASTINE is made in Canada, by Canadian labor, and from rock taken from Canadian mines. The trade 
supplied by Wholesale Hardware and Paint Dealers Alo by 

THE ALABASTINE CO, LIMITED, - - PARIS, ONT. 



I 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 

F=RLJIMIINQ SAWS 



LIMITED. 

ONLY 
WHOLE8ALE 




.UUVU.nu,, 

'>-^«, M .K„,,,, Ul , M , 



No. 16. 18 in. long, 1 Cutting Edge. 



V UUU.UV1AI 1.V 

No. 17. 18-in. long, 2 Cutiing Edge* 




F» R LJ IN I IN G SHEARS 




No. 1630. 8-in , Flat Steel Spring, Blaok. 








No. 7191. 8' -in., Flat steel Spring, Bow Handle. 



No. 0. 9-in.. Japanned Handle, Spiral Brass Spring. 





-in., Japanned Handle, Flat Steel Spring. 



No. 450. 8-in , Crook's Solid Steel, Cast Steel Blades. 



TR 



PRUNERS 




Complete with Poles, 
6. 8, 10. 12 feet 




No. 35. Cast Steel Blades, 26-in. Handles. 
" 38. 41 in 



FOR SHEEP SHEARS AND DEHORNERS. SEE OUR HARDWARB CATALOGUE. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. li-™>. Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



Graham INails ara the Oos-t. 

F »otory : Duff*rin 5l'««l Toronto 



OUR PRICES 

ARE AI8HT 



//ur./mir,- hhiI Metill 



% 



MACHINERY K 



w 



"\\ \T shop has not had their troubles 



THE TOOL-MAKER. 

v T shop has not had the: 
with tin.' incompetence and sloven 
methods of the tool-maker ? This class 
of blacksmiths never seem to realize or 
think thai they " burn money " when they' 
overheat a piece of steel that costs time, 
patience and mone) to finish before being 
hardened, and with •'That'sgoodenough," 
plunge a tool in the water that is black on 
one side and .a bright yellow on the other, 
and wonder why it water-crack-, when it 
is taken out. If such smiths as this had 
to p<\ lor every piece spoiled in this way 
1 think it would finally teach them to be 
more careful in their methods and make 
better workmen of them, writes Thomas 
Beasle\ in Shop Talks. 

The trouble with most tool-smiths is 
that they hurry their heats along too fast, 
not allowing time for their steel to get 
thoroughly heated through. This is to be 
avoided at all times, as the centre of any 
piece of tool steel either to be forged or 
hardened, should be relatively the same 
heat all the way through ; then the strain 
is the -ame inside and out and the danger 
of water-cracks in hardening is reduced to 
the lowest point. 

To illustrate this point, here is what I 
-aw happen to a tool-smith once. He was 
hardening a large pair of forging machine 
die- and had heated o\w and dipped it into 
;i barrel of water and, on taking it out, it 
cracked all to piece-. Naturally he was 
surprised and asked my opinion about it, 
and 1 found, on examination, that he had 
taken it out only partly cooled, and, of 
course, the inside began to expand faster 
than the heat travelled, consequently some- 
thing had ■" give. 

THE CHARCOAL IRON INDUSTRY. 
Faw branches of the iron trade have 
shown a greater teiia. it) of life than that 
which deal- with the manufacture of char- 
coal iron, says an English trade paper. It 
is not 100 years since more than one-half 
of all the iron produicd in the world was 
made with this fuel. On the American 
continent, mainly as a resull of the wealth 
of forest land- -till available, and the vast 
range of demand for a multiplicity of re- 



quirement-, some loo, mm ton- of char- 
coal iron are still annuall) produced, in- 
cluding Canada and the United States. 
On the European Continent the principal 
charcoal iron producer is Russia, which, 
until less than a quarter ol a century ago, 
had a very trifling iron output from 
mineral fuel, but now produces mainly 
coke pig iron. Britain's contribution to 
the world's charcoal iron output i- limited 
to the output of one furnace, worked on 
the Wesl Coast bj Harrison, Ainslie & 
Co. Germany does not produce more than 
8,000 ions of charcoal iron annually, 
while France nearly doubles this quantity, 
having turned out over 7,000 tons in the 
first half of 1902. Swedish pig iron con- 
tinues to be mainly produced with char- 
coal fuel, which is essential to the main- 
tenance of that specially high quality at 
which Swedish manufacturers aim, and 
without which their iron would have but 
little chance in competition with the much 
cheaper brands of Continental Europe 
and the I'nited States. 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES. 

C^HIKF ROE, of the London, Ont., fire 
/ department, has been instructed to get 
estimates of the cost of a steam 
engine, a chemical engine and an exten- 
sion ladder. 

President M.C Burr and Director T. N. 
Minnie, of The Centrifugal Windmill Co., 
Limited, were in Toronto last week buy- 
ing machinery for their factory. 

The boiler and Iwo carloads of electrical 
machinery have arrived for The Mac- 
donald Engineering Co., Owen Sound, 
Ont., lo supply power h^r their new- 
elevator. 

The Canadian Fire Engine Co., of Lon- 
don, Ont.. on January I •"> completed lie 
shipment of three steam lire engines under 
contract with Trenton and Merrickvilk-, 
Ont., and Pugwash, VS. 

Shannon & Co.'s sawmill, located about 
■2't miles north of Prince Albert, Man. .was 
burned to the ground lasi week and con- 
siderable machinery was destroyed. This 
will be renewed at once. 
16 



The Truro, VS., Foundry and Machine 

Co. shipped one carload of boiler and tit- 
ling- from The Mexican and Nova Scotia 
Cold Mining Co. This company is making 
rapid progress under' the able management 
of George W. Stuart. 

SIGNAL FOR RAILWAY CROSSINGS. 

An automatic signal lantern has been 
introduced by the Leipzig, Germany, sheet 
railway companies, which is designed to 
prevent accidents at crossings. The ap- 
paratus consists of two boxes arranged 
one above the other, each having two 
sides fitted with led, and the other two 
with green glass, the red being above the 
green. Cars on one line cause the incan- 
descent lamps in the upper box to glow 
cars on the other line, the lower one. 
This causes, on the approach of a car, 
owing to the arrangement of the glass in 
the box a green light to appeal - on one 
line, which indicates free passage, and a 
red light on the second line signals "slop." 
This does away with the necessity of hav- 
ing the conductor run ahead to inspect the 
crossing and signal lo the motorman when 
the line is clear. Signals are also visible 
in the day time, as reflectors shut out the 
light of the sun, and the apparatus is well 
lighted from the inside. 



The town of Listowel, Out., will apply 
for legislation at tire forthcoming session 
of the House to enable it to acquire the 
plant of The Listowel (las and Electric 
Light Company, and to raise money on 
Gve-year debentures to pay for it. The 
proposal has been ratified by a by law 
recently submitted to the ratepayers. 




Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co., Limited 

Manufacturers of Dyna i and Motors for all pur 

i>u.scs. both 'in'''' and alternating currents. Special 
:it t. ni [on given to repain 

Office and Works, 219 221 Queen Bl East, Toronto. 

Phoiw Main 1251. Estimates cheerfully given, 



MACHINERY 



Hunt ,t tirr ami l/Wn/ 




Will Hold Up a Shelf! 

Thttl'n wlmi u ihi'll iintrki'i H fur. 
For I bin pur ("osr t licrr run I.,- 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

limn till' .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

II Is wall Japanned, Strong km. I Light- 
Tin- Having In t'i •• 1 1; M i Ih u good pcoflt, u.ilde 
from the lower price »l aMU-Ii the goods are sold. 

BUT- Ordi'rdlrt'ctorlbrougb your Jobber. 

• TLAS MFO. CO.. New Haven. Conn.. U.S.A. 

Bargains in New and Rebuilt Machinery. 

bOHLERS. 

II ■'.' "i U 8 in Tubes, Hort al 

H in i n> 

- | In 

80 In ■ 134 In . 81 t In 

\ 7_ in , l .' Economist 

lii-in x Self ( ontained 

I in \\ mi. i Tube Mil r in. 

■Jo in \ :i'J iii , I7i ■ rtiben, Vertical 

80-ln -'in "l"i» I .. 



I'.i in I Mil 

I" u, % I 

'JO II. % 

:w". in \ 7 'J iii 

3u in \ ti in . ■'<( 8 in 



No 9 Pi 

V, I 

Upright. 
Submerged Tubular. 



ENG INES. 



N,. l .1. ■»■. l Vutomal li n 

.. 

N 

\Ml..niiitu , I iiiii.l 



41 -in I 

i 8 In 

x iii [n 

10 In ■ i 

I ill' Marine Qaaollne Engines 

i ll P Double Cylinder " 



loea, and full deeoription ..i an] pieoi of 
machinery aanl on reauesl 

H. W. PETRIE 

131-3-5-7-9-141-43 I I " - "Teal and 

8-10-1'J it li. 18 20 33 Station at, TORONTO. 



Blacksmiths' 

Hand 

Drills. 

The very 
best. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 





We Make 
Good 



VALVES 



Write for Catalogue. 

It tells all about 

them. 



The Kerr Engine Co. 

LIMITED 

Walkervllle, Ont. 



THE ADAMS STOVE PIPE REGISTER, 



I>>".igll i'alrr.trd 

June 29, 1897. 

Drsign Patented 

Auguit 31, 1897. 

M.ulc by 

The Adams 

Company 

Dubuque, 
Iowa, U.S.A. 



UTU C PETpDI C^^" is the best Bolster Spring ever produced A fine 
■■■ laa lae I » !■ I™ W W line for the hardware trade. Write Us for Prioai. 






JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of - 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS, 

ST. MARYS, ONT.. CANADA. 

"Maxwell Favorite Churn" 



Steel Frame Churn. 



LAWN MOWERS. 



Patented Features: Improved Steel 
Stand. Roller Bearings, and Foot 
and Hand Lever Drive, and Detach- 
able Driving Link. Improved for 
season of 1903. Steel or Wood 
Frame as desired. 




High and Low Wheels, from 12-in to 20-in. widths. 
Cold Rolled Steel Shafting. Crucible Steel Knives and 
Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these "THE MAXWELL" Lawn Mower 
articles Bleb Wheal 10 U 

SEND DIRECT TO US. y 





WheelbarrOWS. In four different sires 



IXWELL MOWEB. 
\ heel 



17 



Hnrdvcare and Mrttil 



MACIIINKUV 



NEW SAFETY DEVICE FOR RAILWAYS. 



B] P ll Uwoo, United Btabea Consul at Berli 



I'M I K American newspapers of Novem- 
ber 13 contain a press telegram 
announcing thai on the day previous 
anew electral device for preventing col- 
lision between railway trains lias boon 
tested with entire success in the presence 
of. i board of experts on oik' of the State 
lines near Frankfort. Since any improve- 
ment which can effective!) reduce the 
danger of accident in railway travel ap- 
peal- so directly to popular interest, it has 
been deemed timclv to submit a brief ac- 
count of this new device, which seems to 
mark an important advance step in the 
solution of a difficult and perplexing 
problem. 

It is the joint invention of Hubert Pfir- 
mann and Max Wendorf, and its construc- 
tion and method of operation are .is 
follows: Midway between the rails is 
laid a light third rail of the ordinary T 
pattern, the joints of which are so con- 
nected as to form a continuous conductor. 

Midway under the forward part of the 
engine is hung the working instrument, 
an electrical apparatus inclosed in a square 
ease or jacket occupying a cubic foot of 
space. The instrument is connected with 
a contact -hoe (see illustration), which 
slides along the third rail and by wires 



satisf) himself that it is in full working 
condition. 

The tests on November' 1 2 were con- 
ducted on the main line from Frankfort to 
llanau, between the stations Sachsen- 
hausen and Goldstein, and a translation of 
the official report will illustrate concisely 
the working of the apparatus. Two loco- 
motives, numbered respective!) 290 and 
I 120, had been equipped with the new 
device and the experiments proceeded as 
follows : Engine 290, drawing a special 
train and approaching Sachsenhausen at 
full speed, received the danger signal and 
tame to a full stop ; the driver of 290 then 
asked by telephone the cause of the signal 
and received from the keeper of a grade 
cio-sing, half a mile in front, word that a 
wagon had broken down in crossing t he- 
track and obstructed the line. After ten 
minutes' wait, the engineer of 290 received 
word by telephone that the obstruction had 
been cleared away and thereupon resumed 
his trip. 

A mile farther on, the signal on 290 
again sounded, and the driver was in- 
formed, by telephone as before, that the 
semaphore round a curve and more than 
half a mile distant was set at "halt." 
Thereupon engine 290 slowed down and 




Contact Shoe on Tbird*Rail 



With a telephone and electric alarm bell in 
the cab of the engine-driver, and a red in- 
candescent lamp which is lighted by the 
same impulse which rouses the alarm bell 
into action. A further improvement of 
the device sets the electric brakes on the 
engine or entire train simultaneously with 
the alarm signal which sounds the bell 
and lights the lamp. The apparatus is so 
adjusted and arranged that the engineer 
can at any moment, by touching a lever, 



proceeded cautiously, sounding its whistle 
at short intervals, the telephone bell in the 
drivers' cab ringing continuously until the 
curve was rounded, when the ringing 
teased, notifying the engineer that the 
semaphore had changed to " track clear." 
Thereupon 290 resumed full speed. 

In the lesls to prevent collision, engine 
I 12H came up rapidly from behind and on 
the same track as 290, which had slowed 
down and was proceeding cautiously in 

18 



consequence of reported danger in front. 
The moment that 1420 came within 1,000 
meters (1,093 yards) of 290, the signal on 

both engines began to ring and their red 
lights to glow. Thereupon I 120 halted, 
the driver inquired of 290 in front the 
cause of the alarm, and a complete under- 
standing between the two trains was im- 
mediately established. An important 
point in this connection 




Telephone Alarm Bell and Light in Cab. 

the same warning signal is sounded upon 
every engine equipped with the apparatus 
which is on the same track and within the 
prescribed radius— —a kilometer or a mile, 
as the case may lie from the engine and 
train which cause the obstruction. If a 
semaphore be falsely set at safety, the 
train may run past it into a block in which 
another engine is halted or moving with 
perfect security that warning will be given 
in ample lime to prevent a collision under 
any and all conditions of darkness, tog, 
storm, or mistaken instructions. The in- 
vention has other minor points of useful- 
ness, but the foregoing will be sufficient 
to indicate the general method of its oper- 
ation and the measure of its efficiency. In 
effect, it puts the engine driver of every 
train into instantaneous touch with Other 
trains, switchmen, and station and cros- 
sing keepers in his neighborhood and 
keeps ever before his eve and ear an auto- 
matic and infallible signal which springs 
into activity the moment that his locomo- 
tive, whether running forward or back- 
ward, comes within the radius of danger 
from collision. What ghastly wrecks 
might be spared, what precious lives saved, 
what a sense of added security given to 
multitudes of railway travelers, what de- 
lays avoided under certain atmospheric 
conditions, by a device which puts the 
man behind the headlight, rushing on 
through night and fog and storm, into 
instant and unerring touch with the train 
next in front and with those whose duty it 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



is to watch and guard toe Bafet) ol 1 1 » «.• 
line! Thai the present invention is yel 
perfected and full') adapted to practical 
use is not to be prematurel) assumed; but, 
in the judgment of those whose opinions 
are entitled to respect, the waj has been 
pointed out and the germ ol a new effective 
system disco ered. 

The German Government has directed 
that a section of track be equipped with 
the apparatus for careful, practical experi- 
ments, and ii is reported thai the Govern- 
ment of Russia has obtained license to test 
it in actual service on it-- new militan lines 
now uikUi construction in Siberia. 



A HARDWARE MERCHANT MARRIED. 

On Tuesday, last week, llanv J. L. 
Brathwaite, the genial hardwareman, of 
Kearney, Out., was united in marriage to 
Miss Grace W, Bingham, daughter of 
Wesle) Bingham, Manning avenue, Tor- 
onto. Alter the ceremony an informal 
reception was held, after which over ■"><> 
relatives and intimate friends sal down to 
a daintly prepared breakfast. Mr. and 
Mrs. Brathwaite left in time to lake the 
10 o'clock train to Montreal, after which 
the) will go to their new home in Kearney. 
HaRDWARI and M i: l At joins with the mam 
friends o( Mr. Brathwaite in wishing him 
and his bride many enjoyable and pros- 
perous years together. 



A $50,000 BLAZE. 

A lire thai resulted in damage to the 
I \ amount of $A0, 000 broke out shortl) 
aftei one o'clock oi\ Monda) morning in 
the > in nail and hoi sr nail factor) ol Pe< k, 
Benn) & v o., 61 Mill street, Montreal. 
The loss is entire!) covered b) insurance. 

So i H had the fire progressed when dis- 
covered that the watchman, who had been 
in the engine-room making read) lor the 
day's work, saw liist the flames bursting 
forth from the building. In a short time 
the entire fire brigade o\ the cit) was on 
the scene, and for an houi and a half 
worked hard before the lire was under 
control. Between the heav) smoke which 

at times made it almost impossible to see, 
and the vers Cold weather, it being then 

aboul 15 degrees below zero, great diili- 
culty was experienced. 

It was oul of the question to save the 
nail mil], bill the rolling mill and other 
large plants in the vicinity, among them 
the Livingstone Linseed Oil Works, were 
saved b) the efforts of the Firemen, assisted 
h\ a heav) lire wall on the west o\ 
(he nail factory. 

The insurance on the building, plant 
and stock was divided among the follow- 
ing companies : Aetna, $3,000 ; Alliance, 
$2,000 ; Commercial Union, $2,500 ; 



Hartford, $2,1 Livei pool and I. and 

i , f 000 j London and I .an. .. 

■ . London Assurai 
North \meii. a. $2,000 . North British 
Men. mill - Northern 

Norwich Union, - Phoeni 

Brooklyn, $3,000; Phoenix "i London, 

$ l, ' ; Quebi - ■• . Royal - 

Scottish l nion and National 
Western, $3,1 



TO BOOM PORT SIMPSON 

A syndicate o\ Vancouver and Victoria 
people are organizing to boom Porl simp- 
son, I!. C, in order to make a land specu- 
lation profitable to them. The have 

red an option on \'l\ acres of land 

fronting for about quartet >>i a mile on the 

harbor al Port Simpson, and lhe\ claim 

thai either the Grand Trunk Pacifii t<r the 
Canadian Northern will make thai place 
their terminus. They, therefore, propose 
to sub-divide the land the) now control 
into I, loo building lots, which they will 
sell at $100 each. Tile company will, 

undei the style of the Port Simpson Land 

& Improvement Co., advertise the land in 
all parts of Canada. 



I). \Y. Flack, general merchant, 
Lake, \ u .'I '., ba sold out. 



PRATT & WHITNEY'S 



Standard Taps and Dies. 




No. 4 Set — Lengths of Die Stock, 48-in. Six Dies U. S. Standard Cutting 7, s -in. , 1 -in., 1 ' s -in., 
i^-in., ifg-in., ij^-in. Other sizes carried in stock. We are sole Canadian Agents for these 
tools, and will be pleased to furnish catalogues and prices on application. 

THE FAIRBANKS COHPANY, 



MONTREAL. 



VANCOUVER, 



19 



Haniti ii r ,- .in, I Mflnl 



Window and Interior Displays 



Timely Hints 
and Suggestions. 



WE WANT YOUR ASSISTANCE. 

IN order tomakethisdepartment a decided 
success and to enable us to give the 
tesl assistance, we wain you to 
send u> photographs of an] design you have 



camera will not be more than the width of 
the sidewalk, or 8 or 10 ft. away from the 
window and a screen B or 10 ft. in height, 
held close behind the camera, should 
obscure the building's on the opposite side 



larger it is the more light is admitted and 
the shorter the exposure necessary, but a 
smaller diaphragm gives sharpness to the 
picture. In a photo by night the passing 
of people between the camera and the 



adopted in your windows or interior which of the street. This screen can be made of window does not interfere with the picture. 



you think worthy of notice. These we 
will publish and criticize. If the design 
is o\ special construction, state how it 
was built, the foundation used, etc. 

For some time at least we are prepared, 
where desired, to pay the necessarv ex- 
penses incurred by 
the merchant in the 
taking of any picture 
which we think suit- 
able for publication. 

By the use of illus- 
trations in this de- 
partment every mer- 
chant will be bene- 
fitted, and sugges- 
tions and photographs 
of window dressing 
or store interiors will 
be credited to the 
sender. 

Lend us your assis- 
tance, and not only 
yourselves but your 
brother merchants all 
over Canada will ap- 
preciate your trouble. 

ID PHOTOGRAPH THE 
WINDOW. 

Perhaps mam of 

our readers do not 
know how to photo- 
graph a window, and, 
having tried, have- 
not obtained a pic- 
ture worth sending. 
In taking photo- 
graphs il is well to 

remember thai il is extremely difficult 
lo lake a picture by day, as the light being 
better outside than in the window causes 
reflections on the glass. Night is the best 
time. If you must have the picture by 
day you will probably have to obtain the 
services of a couple of boys lo hold a screen 
behind the camera in order to shut out 
the buildings across the street. This is 
not so difficult as it would appear. The 



dark bunting or cheap cloth of any kind, 
fastened to two rods. The early morning 
just before sunrise is the best time for day- 
light pictures, as the light is clear and the 
annoyance of people walking on the street 
is avoided 



In photographing interiors, all that is 
necessary to remember is that you must 
not face a window if it can be avoided, as 
the halation blurs the surrounding space. 
It is far more satisfactory to use Hash 
Remember that in any case lights for this purpose. There are Hashes 

on the market that 
cost only 25c. for 
seven, and a failure 
with them has seldom 
been seen. Instruc- 
tions for flash-light 
pictures will be given 
to anyone desiring 
them. If a merchant 
is not clear on any 
point in photograph- 
ing windows or in- 
teriors, we will be 
pleased to supply 
him with any infor- 
mation he desires. 

With photographs 
send a short descrip- 
tion of the window 
or interior to assist 
us in determing how 
the display was con- 
structed or the effect 
aimed at. 



THIS WEEK'S ILLUS. 
TRATION. 

The striking fea- 
ture of the design 
given in the accom- 
panying illustration 
is the small number 




v^w^^a 



A Nt-.it ami Seasonable Window 

must be lighter than 



th« 



i he window 
exterior. 

In taking pictures by night have your 
window as well lighted as possible, but have 
the lights themselves concealed from the 
slreet. If you have a good lens, a half a 
minute's exposure may be sufficient, but 
the length of exposure depends entirety on 
the light and the quality of lens. The 
size of the diaphragm also counts, as the 
■2U 



ol articles shown. 
The floor of the window is a mirror, and 
around the sides is piled cotton batting to 
represent snow. A mirror of any size 
may be used and the edges concealed by 
the batting. In the edges of the batting 
can be placed sod in small pieces, assist- 
ing the effect of the edge of a pond. 
Although the window is a hockey window 
the sleigh at the back relieves a possible 
monotony in the stretch of white. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINNIPEG IMPLEMENT BANQUET. 

ONE of the mosl successful banquets 
ever held was given bj the Win- 
nipeg Implemenl Men's Associa- 
tion >>i\ Monda) evening, lasl week. 
Among those present were: 11 W. 
Hutchinson, of The Fairchild Co.; J. E. 
Ruby, of The Frosl & Wood Co., 
Limited; Geo. Forsythe, of The Massey- 
rlarris Co., Limited ; J. J. Buggie, Cana- 
dian Moline Plough Co.; F. W. Peters, 
general freight agent of the C.P.R. ; L.H. 
Hartshorn, American Abel! Co.; A. E. 
Kennaston, American Abell Co.; A, C. 
McRae, McRae Carriage Co.; G. W. 
Erb, Waterous Engine Co.; J. D. Bajfour, 
Balfour Implemenl Co.; A. M. Stewart, 
Stewart & Metcalfe; A. E. Mott, Cock- 
shutl Plow Co. ; R. McKenzie, Mc- 
Laughlin Carriage Co.; J. G. Norris, 
manager of The Garr-Scott Co.; R. H. 
Potter, Champion Harvester Co.; J. B. 
McCutcheon, Nichol & Sheppard ; H. 
Donaldson, McCormick Harvesting Ma- 
chine Co. ; A. ci. Watson, of The Watson 
Co. 

[oastmaster J. E. Ruby proposed the 
first toast, "The King," which was re- 
ceived by singing (he National Anthem. 

" Our Countrj " was proposed and re- 
sponded to by T. L. Metcalfe, the solicitor 
for the Association. In a happy speech 
he referred to the conditions of the coun- 
try, which made him happy that he was a 
British subject and a Canadian, and par- 
ticularly that lie was a resident of Mani- 
toba and o{ Winnipeg. The peace and 
prosperity o( the country was great, and 
the feelings between Canada and the 
United States were o( the most friendly 
nature. England and the United States 
had met in bloody war in the past, but in 
the future lie was confident that they 
would march side bv side for the advance- 
ment of Christianity, trade and commerce, 
and do lasting good in the world. He 
believed that in the near future there 
would be greater population west o( the 
great lakes than in the east. Not that the 
east would not advance, but that the west 
would advance taster. 

"The Implement Interests, 1883-1803," 
was responded to b\ II. \V. Hutchinson, 
lie said that it was just 20 years since he 
had arrived in Winnipeg, and that there 
had been many changes in the implement 
business since then. The limited amount 
of lailwav facilities, the sparseness of 
population and general conditions made 
competition very keen. Not only that, 
but there was jealous} and ill-feeling be- 
tween the different firms. In the old davs 
the only railways were from Emerson to 
Winnipeg, a main line west to Moosomin, 



and east to I'oit \i I hiti . In 1886 aline 

was built to Manitou, and from Regina to 
Prince Albeit. The freight rates win 
\ ei v high, as inn, h as s ISO i"i a i 
wagons, whereas now the rate vvas onlj 

SUIT. Following the boom main came 

wrst with onlv $100 to stait farming, who 
were entirelj unlit for tin- occupation. 
This meant that there vvas nuu h valueless 

papei floating around, and the implement 

men gol moie than their share of it. 
i OMPARA I IVI-. PRICES. 
Mr. Hutchinson then went on to com- 
pare the prices oi\ implements in 1883 ami 
1903. A I i-inch breakei in 1883 cosl 
$-K'i, to-dav $2u ; an American plow cost 
$-21, now $-20 ; a Canadian plow cost Si' I, 
now $18 ; a farm wagon $1 It), now $90 ; 
a farm sleigh $."><», now $27 ; a hinder 
$350, now $150 ; a mower $105, now $45; 
rakes, $4">, now $:{.">, etc. He then ex- 
plained that to-day the farmers of Mani- 
toba and the Northwest were getting their 
implements at prices as cheap or cheaper 
than the farmers of Dakota. He esti- 
mated that the business done in farm 
implements in Manitoba and the North- 
west for last year amounted to almost 
$16,000,000. 



NEW HARDWARE FIRM. 

H. A. Couse, of this town, and Andrew 
Rougvie, o( Goderich, have associated 
themselves in partnership and have pur- 
chased the hardware business of E. M. 
Marshall, which the latter gentleman has 
carried on here in the Carter block on 
Mast Front street for some years past. The 
deal vvas Completed yesterday and the 
new proprietors will take possession of the 
premises as soon as stock-taking is com- 
pleted. Mr. Rougvie will arrive here 
from Goderich this week and will become 
a resident of Sarnia. The hardware busi- 
ness at present conducted bv Mr. Couse 
on West Front street will be continued 
indefinitely in the store now occupied 
Samia Observer, January 13. 



" SUN " BRAND CEMENT. 

The Sun Portland Cement Co., Limited, 
of Clvven Sound, have been on the market 
with their " Sun " brand since October last, 
and it is said that this brand has already 
gained a good reputation for itself. The 
capacitv of their plant for the coming sea- 
son will be between 100 and and barrels 
per day. The company is under the 
management o( Jas. A. (.'line, former!) a 
hardware merchant and furniture manu- 
facturer of Wiiigham. 




'Happy is the Farmer who 



uses the Paris Green manu- 
factured by The Canada 
Paint Company for he shall 
find comfort ! 



'Unhappy is the Colorado 



Potato bug which partakes 
of the Paris Green manu- 
fictured by the Canada 
Paint Company for he shall 
receive a speedy death ! " 



The Canada Paint Com- 
pany Paris Green is manu- 
factured from a formula 
which gives it the highest 
possible place as an insecti- 
cide. It is undoubtedly the 
best that can be made. 



As we manufacture direct 
from the essential chemicals, 
we are able to guarantee a 
uniformly superior article, 
and always in advance of 
the Government Standard. 
Beware of imported greens. 
They are so unsatisfactory. 
Dealers should write The 
Canada Paint Companv for 
handsome show card. It 
will be expressed free. 



//■ir./ivilrv anil l.Vt'fu/ 




DEVELOPING THE PAINT TRADE. 

Ml \ I the paint trade can be develop 



T 



attention and progres 
thods seems to be generally 
to bj the jobbers as well a* by 
retailers who have given the matter some 
thought, a feature which contributes 
materially u> such a possibility, is the 
al desire oi mankind to have bis 
property as attractive as his neighbors. 

L'his has been illustrated bj several ex 
amples which have come under the notice 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 
The company have, in several instances, 
built a station house and residence com- 
bined for its agents in out of the way 
places. In each case the residences wete 
painted a bright color, and it seems that 
the effect on the farmers living in the 
neighborhood, were so influenced by the 
appearance of the gay little station, that 
one by one, barns and farmhouses, from 
hillside to valley, will take on coatings 
just like th.-ir dignified and prim neigh- 
bor. The appearance of the hamlets is 
entirely changed, so that passengers, in 
-t.ad of having to look upon colorless, 
bleak, and sombre hued roofs and weather- 
beaten houses, see neat little cottages 
surrounded by livid-coloied outhouses. 

Hardwareinen can carry out the same 
idea, first, by painting attractively their 
own stores and residences, then by influ- 
encing, in such ways as pre.-ent themselves, 
their neighbors to follow their example. 
The result will be satisfaction for their 
neighbors, and increased results for them 
It is by such methods as these 
that trade is expanded when it seems to 
have reached it- natural limitation-. 

PAINT WORKS THREATENED. 

A fire broke out on Tuesday morning in 
the premises of McColl Bros. & Co., var 
nish and oil manufacturers, etc., 533 St. 
Paul street, Montreal, and for a short 
time thi o develop into a verj 

disetrous one A lamp, standing near 
a number of barrels of oil, exploded, and 
the fire extended to a large bale of wa-te. 
The fire commenced to spread rapidly, but 
nn the arrival of the Gremen upon the 
scene, it was Boon placed under control. 
Tie was slight. 

HERBERT HENRY ELLIS. 
If. TI. Ellis has received the apj 

melit from The Canada Taint Oompain 

as traveller for the territory known a- 
N'orth and Northwestern Ontario. Mr. 
Kb,, i- a popular salesman, who under- 



stands the requirements of the hardware 
and paint trade thoroughly, and his 
friend- are congratulating hint heartily 
upon the fact of his being allied to The 
Canada Paint Company, whose manufac- 
tures are so widely known. 

PAINT MEN IN MONTREAL. 

II. ft. Sherwin, president of The Sher- 
win-Williams Paint Company; W. II. Cot 
tingham, general manager ; J. C. Beard 
slec, genera] superintendent. were in 
Montreal last week looking after the in- 
terests of the new factory to be built 
there. They are more than satisfied with 
the Canadian business, and expect it will 
double itself in the course of the next 
few year-. 

THE OWEN SOUND LINSEED MILL. 

TT J ITH a capital of 8100,000 The 
\ \ Ontario l.indseed Oil Company, 
Limited, has been incorporated, 
to carry on the manufacture of linseed 
oil and oil cake in Owen Sound, Ont., the 
chartered headquarters of the firm, says 
The Owen Sound Times. The officials 
of the new organization follow : F. G. 
Sanderson, St. Marys, president and man- 
aging director ; John Parker, Owen 
Sound, secretary-treasurer ; Aaron Bead, 
Owen Sound, and Isaac M. Lev an, Wood 
stock, directors. The company introduces 
two able men in Owen Sound's industrial 
undertakings in ex-Mayor Head and J. M. 
Levan, Principal of the Woodstock Colle- 
giate Institute. Lots 23 and 24 Water 
street we-t, on which property the mill 
will be located, has been surveyed, ('has. 
V. Limes, sr.. of The Charles F. Limes 
Engineering Co., of Chicago, accompanied 
by George E\ Gray, architect, of the same 
city, were in town on Tuesday. The 
former is recognized as the leading manu- 
facturer of linseed oil machinery on the 
continent, while the latter makes a Spe 
cialty of designing mills for the manufac- 
ture of this product. On Tuesday, these, 
gentlemen, accompanied by F. G. Sander 
son, S. J. Parker. John Parker and A 
Read, all directors of the company, went 
down to the property and spent some 
time then- making measurements and sec 
uring other information necessary for the 
experts. Mr. Limes left for Toronto on 
Tuesday, and Mr. Gray for Chicago yes 
terday morning. J. Parker, secretar) 
treasurer of the company, said to The 
Times today: " We are sparing no ex- 
pense to make the plant thoroughly mod 
ern. Our agreement with the corporation 



calls for buildings and plant to cost at 
least X25.HIHI. Our buildings and plant 
will cost nearly twice that amount. It 
will be a -ix press mill, capable of being 
enlarged to a twelve-press mill, or nearly 

as huge as the Livingstone mill, which is 
a 15 press, and the largest in Canada. 
The buildings will be of stone, partly 
three and partly two-storeys high, and 

the oil tanks will be of steel.'' Mr. 
Parker added that the material would be 
hauled to the site as soon as practicable, 
and that the machinery would be ready 
to be installed as soon as the buildings 
wen up. The plant will be ready for 
operations when the new seed arrives, 
and. in fact, will work on old seed if it 
can be ontained. 

PAINT AND OIL NOTES. 

The assets of John McArthur & Co., 

paint dealers, etc.. have been sold. 

Desmarais & Kits have registered as 
painters and contractors, Shawenegan 
Kalis. Que. 

The Toronto Union of Painters and 
Decorators' have notified the master 
painters of that city that on and after 
April 15 next, they will demand 35c. per 
hour, instead of 30c, the sum now paid 
them. 

The paint manufacturers of Montreal, 
Toronto and Brantford have decided to 
offer no objections to a duty on lead and 
lead products, if their products, white 
lead, paints, etc.. are included in the 
lines further protected. 

PAINT AND OIL MARKETS. 
TORONTO. 

Tl RPENTENE and putty provide the 
Features of the week. Putty has 

stiffened, the rise ranging from 10 
to IV. Turpentine also shows an ad- 
van, e of lc. in the week, and prophesies 
are freely made that pi ices will go mate 
rially higher. The demand is faiily 
strong, but not as active as jobbers an- 
ticipated. Linseed oil is firm, owing to 
the stiffness of seed on the home market, 
and the high prices of oil in England. We 
quote : 

WHITE LEAD.— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, So to 85.25 ; No. 1, $4.62* to 
54.87$: No. 2, $4.25 to $4.50; No. 3, 
83.S7* to $4.12*.; No. 4, $3.50 to $3.75 
in packages of 25-tb. and upwards ; -Jc. 
per ft. extra will be charged for I2*lb 
pkjs.; genuine dry white lead in casks, 
S5.02L 

RED LEAD. Genuine, in casks of 560 
lb., $1.50 ; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5 ; 



PAINT, oil. AM) BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware a ml MrUil 





Don't Stand in 
Your Own Light. 

%/ YOU are Standing in your own light if you are not 
carrying a line of "Ark lirand" Paints. 

"Ark Rrand" is an absolutely honest paint that will not 
crack, chalk nor peel, and that invariably gives satisfaction. 
Hi re's what one of our representatives says about it. 

Missks FRANCIS I . Limited. Toronto. Ont 

Dl \K Siks.— Afii-r .1 f.nr trial of your "Ark Brand" I 
(as a practical paintei ). I lake the opportunity la write you ud 
give you my bonesi opinion on "Ant Brand ' Patau i 
taken some trouble in testing tin- v.ir.oiis bran pared 

paints, b .ill I lanadian and Vmerican, and I have no hesitation 

lying tli.it "ArK Brand" Taints h I 

f ictory of any ol tluin . ami I consider Ihem tli<- verj 
paints f«r any ouiside work on tin- market lo day, taking | 
ai 'I quality into consideration. As lor your celebrated Hoot 
paint I can sell more of your brand and give lnrtt<-r satisfat tion 
than any other kind I have tried You are at liberty to use mv 
n. une in recommendation of your paints 
Sours Respectfully, 

1 \mi.s I) SMITH, Tainterand Decorator. 

The experience of his in handling "Ark Brand" can be 
yours if you will carry the line. 




Francis-Frost C 



1 i r 1 1 i i • ■ I 



Canadian Distributing Agents 
for Grippin's CracK Filler. 



Toronto. 



THE ONLY ONE. 

HOLLYWOOD 
PAINT 

is the only manufactured paint on the 
market to-day that can be used when 
an architect's specifications call for lead 
and oil. That is why the dealers are 
selling such large quantities. 

Write us a card for particulars. 

The Hollywood Paint Co. 



HAMILTON, CANADA. 



Limited. 



RE-ACTING WASHER 




x 



„ I -• i.tn.lly <ai 

Machine on the market ' "•"»n« 

- will hsv.- aft.r t.uyiiik- ,»n. of , hln _. 

is thai ihiy <li.| not kii.iw aliout n tooner " nl1 "" 



.. than 



I'l'lj Ih.ln Clr.l. . 



The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., 

HAMILTON. 

W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal, Eastern Agents. 



23 



Harilrrtirt- .ifii/ Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



75 ; ditto, 
iii kegs of 100 tt>., 14.25 

LITHARGE.— Genuine, 6 to t>ic. 

WHITE Zl\ me, French V.M.. 

in casks, $6 25; Lehigh, in casks, $6 to 

SHINGLE STAIN.— In 5-gallon lots. 
60 i • gallon. 

PARIS WHITE.— 90c. to §1 per 100 lb. 
WHITING.— 65c. per 100 lb.; Gilders' 

M llil; 

GUM SHELLAC— In cases, 35 to 37o.; 
i-i less than cases, Iv to 42c. per lb. 

LIQUID SHELLAC.— Pure orange, in 
bbls., 12.25 to tfJ.35 ; white, §2.35 to 
|2.45 per gal. ; in less quantities, 10c. 
extra. 

GLUES.— Broken sheet, in 200-lb. bbls., 
Stye, per lb.; cabinet glue, in bbls., 12c; 
emery glue, in bbls., 17Jc; bookbinders', 
[[round, lO^c; finest American, white. 
L9c; No. I American white, 15c. per lb. 

PUTTY.— Bladders, in barrels, £2.10 ; 
bladders, in Inn lb. kegs, 82.25; bulk in 
barrels, $1.80; bulk, less than barrels, 
and up to 100 lb., - S 2.U5 ; bladders, bulk 
or tins, less than LOO lb., $2.75. 

PARIS GREEN.— Petroleum bbls., 14c. 
per lb.; arsenic kegs, 14Jc; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, 15c; 25-lb. drums, 15-Jc; 1-lb. 
packages, 16c; -J-lb. packages, 18c; 1-lb. 
tins, 16c; $-Ib. 18c. 

PLASTER PARIS.— New Brunswick, 
*'J per barrel. 

PUMICE STONE.— Powdered, §2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls. and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c in small lots and 
8c. in bbls. 

LIQI ID PAINTS.— Pure, 81.20 to 11.40 
per gallon; No. 1. $1.10 per gallon. 

BARN PAINTS.— 65 to 70c per gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— English, in cases, 9 to 
9£c. per lb., and 10 to lOic for single 
tins. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, 1 to 2 bbls., 61c; 
boiled, 64c; 3 to 5 barrels, raw, 60c : 
boiled, 63c.; 6 to 9 barrels, raw, 58c. ; 
boiled, 61c. delivered. To Toronto, Ham- 
ilton and London, 2c less. All quanti- 
ties of I' 1 barrels and over of linseed oil 
-' '1' 1 only f.o.b., Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don and Guelph. 

TURPENTINE.— Single bbls., 86c ; 2 to 
3 bbls., 85c. delivered. Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London, Ic. less. For less quant i 
ties than barrels, 5c per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages, 
and 10-gallon packages, 80c will be 
charg 

GASOLINE AND BENZINE.— We quote 
aa foil. .v.- Benzine, I9£c. and gasoline. 
ordinary, 21£c. and engine, 22£c. f.o.b. 
■nto. 

MUM REAL. 

Notwithstanding the uncertain move- 
ments of the travellers, in consequence of 
the storms and -now blockades, the paint 
grinders report a pretty brisk business for 
this time of the year. The week ha-- been 
phenomenal for bookings and shipment of 
white lead. In fact, it is now almost on 
a [jar with coal, and the dealers find it 
difficult to make the supply go around, 
and to satisfy the demands of the trade 
calling out for white lead, and, like 
Oliver Twist, wanting more. Turpentine 
keeps linn, and with the supplies coming 



forward in an inactive and limited way, 
it would not surprise the trade if higher 
ked. There has been a re- 
duction of 10c. all around in the price of 
putty. Other branches teal healthier on 
the strength of the increasing spring de- 
amnd. We qu< 

GROUND WHITE LEAD.-Best brands. 
Government standard, §4.90 to §5.15; 
No. 1, §4.67* to §4.774 ; No. 2, 84.30 to 
$4.40; No. 3, $3.92J to $4.02}; No. 1, 

§3 55 to §3.65 all f.o.b., Montreal. Terms, 
I months, or 3 per cent, off for cash in 
30 days. 

DRY WHITE LEAD— §5 in casks, and 
in kegs, §5.25. 

DRY WHITE ZINC.-Pure dry, io 
casks, 6£e.; in 100-tb. kegs, 6Jc. No. 1 
zinc, in casks, 5£c; in 100-tb. kegs, 5»c 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25-tb. irons, 8c; No. 1, 7c; No.2, 6c. 

PI TTY.— We quote : Bulk, in barrels, 
$1.80 per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 
§1.95: bladders, in barrels, §2.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 or 200-lb. kegs or boxes, 
$2.25 : in tins, sl>.-_>() to $2.50 : in less 
than 100-tb. lots, §2.75 f.o.b., Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Maritime Provinces, 10c. higher, 
f.o.b., St. John and Halifax. Three per 
cent, discount for cash in 30 days. 

ORANGE MINERAL.— Casks, 7c; 100 
lb. kegs, 7 Jo.; smaller quantities, 8Jc. 

RED LEAD. — Genuine red lead, in casks 
S450 ; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.75 ; in less 
quantities, $5.75 per 100 lb. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $4.25 ; kegs, $4.50, and 
smaller quantities, $5.50. 

LITHARGE— Ground, casks, 5c ; less 
quantities, 5£c; flake litharge, casks, 
$5.25 ; smalls, $5.75 per 100 lb. 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 
60c; boiled, 63c; raw, 5 to 9 barrels, 
59c; boiled, 62c. Terms, net cash in 30 
days. Delivered in Ontario, between 
Montreal and Oshawa, at 2c per gallon 
advance. 

TURPENTINE.— Single barrels, 82c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 81c. Terms, net cash in 30 
days. 



SHELLAC VARNISH.-Pure white, 
$2.35 to $2.45 ; orange, $2.25 to $2.35. 

Ml\l I) PAINTS— $1.20 to $1.40 pet- 
gallon. 

CASTOR 0IL.-S-' to '.'!.. in wholesale 
lots, and $c additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL.— 48 to 50c 

COD OIL.— 35 to 37*6. 

l'l in. CANADIAN PARIS GREEN.- 
Petroleum barrels, I3{e. per lb.; arsenic 
kegs, Utyc.; 50 and 100-lb. drums, lie; 
25 lb. drums, 1 I Ac; I lb. packages, 15c. ; 
\ Hi. packages, 176; I lb. tins, 16c; J-lb. 
tins, 18c 

PURE ENGLISH PARIS GREEN.— 
Petroleum barrels, M|c; arsenic kegs, 
I He; 50 and 100-lb. drums, 15c; 25- 
lb. drums. I.">.\r.; I lb. paper boxes, 16c; 
1-tb. tins, 17c 

WINDOW GLASS. 

TORONTO. 

Prices are steadily stiffening, and the 
present would appear to be a safe time 
for retailers to lay in stocks of window 
glass, as the prices are likely to be ad- 
vanced when there is a better under 
standing among the jobbers. We quote 
as follows: Under 26 in., $4.25 ; 26 to 10 
in., $4.65; 41 to 50 in.. $5.10; 51 to 60 
in., §5.35; 61 to 70 in.. $5.76; 71 to 8(1 
in . $6.25 ; 81 to 85 in., §7 ; 86 to 90 in., 
$7.75. Toronto, Hamilton and London. 
Terms, four months, or 3 per cent., 30 
days. Discount, 15 per cent. 

MONTREAL. 

The glass market has improved slightly 
since last week, and a few large orders 
have been secured. Our representative 
was informed that the price of idass for 
importation by the first steamer was 
somewhat lower than last year, but in 
all probability would not alter the prices 
now quoted. Our quotations are as 
follows : First break, 50 ft., §2; second, 
§2.10 for 50 ft. ; first break, 100 feet, 
§3.80 ; second break, $4 ; third break, 
§4.50 ; fourth break, $4.75. 



TO CONTROL 

in your district the best liquid paint in the market is worth your 

attention. 

"ANCHOR" 
LIQUID PAINT 

excels all others. The White Lead used in its manufacture is the 

best the world can produce.-— "Brandram's" B.B. Genuine. 






Send os a post card and let us 
tell you all about it. 



HENDERSON & POTTS 

HALIFAX and MONTREAL 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



DEATH OF SENATOR A. T. WOOD. 



A I I I l; .hi ui tack ol pleui isy, which 
lasted i. ui in la] . Hon. Andrew 

Tn'« Wood, membei ol the Can 

adian Senate, and "i I Hamilton 

,,,,, i progrei ii e bu ixu n, died at 

ln~ borne ai 9.46 o'clock Wednesday morn 
bag. 

The late Senator Wood was born al 
Moum iu>n is. Armagh, Ireland, In 1826, 

i be eldest son ol eight children. He 
was given a Bound English and mathe 
matical education, iut<l in I s 1 1 he rmnot 
ed bo New Xbrk, which city be left two 
j , ;,i latet i" go t.. Toronto, « bare be 
entered the employ <>f the late Jame 
Ryan, hardware dealer. While in the lat 
tar's employ he was Bent t«> Hamilton to 
manure a branch in that city. In l^l-> 
he engaged with William Atkinson & 
Son. wholesale and retail hardwaxemen, 
Where he made rapid progress and won 
a high reputation with the trade. In 
November ol the next year, at the death 
..i' Mr Atkinson, he purchased the firm's 
retail branch, which he carried on lor 
some time 

His advent in the wholesale hardwan 
business was in 1852, when lie bought out 
the business ol Benjamin Miller & Co., 
which he carried on alone until 1859, 
w Inn he formed it partnership with Mat 
thru Leggatt. This partnership contin 
Ued for 30 years, during which time the 
linn's business extended until it was re 
cognized as an important factor in the 
hardware business in nearly every section 
of Canada. 

When, in 1899, Mr. Lrggatt retired, the 
present firm, Wood, Valance >S: Co., was 
formed, the deceased's son. William \ 
and George and William Valance being 
admitted into the company. The firm 
continues with branches in Toronto, 

Winnipeg and Vancouver. 

Whih m do senBe a speculator, the late 
Mr. Wood was associated with se 
companies which have contributed to the 
industrial prosperity of Hamilton. He 
was one of the first promoters of the 
Wellington, Grej and Bruce Railway, 
took an active part in the bonus cam- 
paign, and was a director of the com 
pany during its existence till it was ab 
Borbed by the old Great Western Railway 
pany. He also aided in promoting 
the Hamilton and Lake Erie and Hamil 
ton and Northwestern Railway lines. He 
was the original organizer ol The Ont 
aii.> Cotton Mills Company, now The 
Ontario Cotton Company, ol which he 

was president for a number ol years, and 
of which he was director till his death 
He was a director ol Hie Hamilton Bridge 
Works Company for a number of years; 
also of the Bank of Hamilton He was 
vice-president of The Hamilton Provident 



and Loan Company, with which In 

connected since 1 1 inception. He w s 
ol the promotei ol tht melting wi 
and u as a lin l" hai eh< ildei in 1 he 

Hamilton lion and Steel Company. He 

« as also intei e ted in ot her entei pi 

Out ide ol bu in natters he was pub 
lie pirited, | ind alert lb- 

had, too, ben pi, nl, lit of t be oil He 
chanic Institute and i >i t he I lamilti "i 
Board ol Trad. 

He was a -launch Liberal in politic-. 
and in the general elections in January, 
l ^7 I. he u as elected to i he Hon 
Commons, his colleague being V.emilius 
Irving, K.C, At that time the trade 
question was one of till' issues before Un- 
people, and Mi Wood declared himself in 




Flu i ■'■ * oator A T w 

favor of protection for revenue purp 
with due regard to the fostering of home 
manufacturing industries. Metearfi. Wood 
and Irving were unseated on petition, and 

were I 111 Ma\ . I B76 W bile in 

Parliament at that time Mr. Wood was 
chairman of the Manufacturers' Commit 
tee for four years, and he always took a 
leading part in the debates on matters 
affecting trade and commerce. 

lb- wai again, in 1896, elected to the 
Dominion Parliament, his colleague then 
being T. II Haopherson. In 1900 Mr. 
Wood, who was a partner of .1 \ l.,-t 
/el, K.C, tor election purposes, was de 
feated alone with Mr. Teetzel, their suc- 
cessful opponents for Parliamentary lion 
ore being S. Barker ami F. ('. Bruce. Mr. 

Wood was appointed to the Senate on 
January "J I . 1901. 

The late Hi u ! -. .,. twice married. 

in 1851, to Mary F . eldest daugh- 
tei ,.f the lat,, William Freeman, of Salt 



Beet, by whom he had tw< 
daughtei Hi 

of the I II White 

one of t he |, • ilia, 

married to him in 18(13, and i 
he had three dau I Idren 

are William \ ol Hamilto 
of Winnip Hi Re nto j Hi 

Bei t Walsh, i Hi Robert Hob 

on and Hi Oln ol l»> l 

■oil Olmsted, ol Hamilton 



A GOODYEAR FOR HAROWAREMEN. 



V 



I', I 1 1\ \ \ I pi i it we 
by the membe - ol the haul., 
i ion of t lie l oronto Boai d ol 
Trade at the meeting on Honday aftei 
in ion l In spirit w at al o reft cted in 

the addle-- of Peleg How land, who 

bairman ol the ection loi I 

yea I 

A t i he tame time Mi lb m land utt- 
note <,f warning again ' ovei buying, 
which the trade would do well to heed in 
tin- next year or two. 

Mr. Rowland's report was ai follows 

Gentlemen, Inquiry in the diffi 
blanche, ol trade by this section con 
Grms the general opinion that 

has lie.-n g I during 1902, pi He- being 

comparatively steads-, the demand li 
and the I dl. 

Troubles, besides those ordinarily iii 

cident to business, have, however, exist 
ed, such as unreasoning competition : 
difficulty in obtaining goods, owing to 
either limited capacity ol manufactu 
or shortages in supply of raw material 

Railroads have been -low in making 
liveries, because ol conge tion ol In 
and shortage ol rolling stock. 

Complaints also are made that I 

has been hampered by the difficult!) 

the St. Lawrence route and the lack ot 
facilities at the port of Montreal. 

The outlook is bright for at lea-t the 
first half of 1903, the country, as a 
whole, being in perhaps a better condi- 
tion for the consumption ol goods than 
ever before. 

The tendency to over trade, thouedi 
hard to resist in such times, should be 
guarded against, and a careful outlook 
for signs ol a chai 

The burden of the higher freight r 
which came into effect on January I. 
cannot entirely bo shifted to the con- 
sumer, and will help towards increa 
the expense ol conducting business al 
ready largely enhanced by genera) con- 
ditions. 

The movement on foot for an in, 
in the tariff, which is being inaugurated 
by the manufacturers, if successful, must 
affect all branches of this business, and 

should be carefully watched by tie- mem 

bers of the section. Whet will 

be anj result has not, as yet, In en pub 
licl\ indicated. 

PELEG HOWLAND, 

( hnirmnn 
The following officers were eli 

t hail man \ \ HcHicl 
Chairman I ' . D< 

■ - i - . 
- 
H Watson, J. J G irtsl i M 

lor and .1 II Pal tei si • 1 1 



Hh r il a-ii re <i«i/ .V«-/<i/ 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



AND ALLIED TRADES 



GURNEY CO.'S CONVENTION. 

0\ Tuesday and Wednesday, the man 
- and salesmen oi The Gurney 
Foundry Company, Limited, met io 
ntion at the firm's general offices, 

ato, to discuss matters ol interest to 

the linn and to the firm's customers. 

were present : Edward Gurnej . 

president; W. H. Carrick, vice-president 

irewral manager; W. E. Gurney, 2nd 
vice-president; F. 15- Skinner, treasurer; 
T. B. Ucock, secretary ; James Bickey, 
superintendent; W. •). Ballarn, general 
jollier. Toronto ; C. L. Lightfoot, man- 
auei ol the British-Columbian agency, al 
Vancouvei ; -James Drewe, manager of 
the Manitoba agency, at Winnipeg; 
R. .1. Lockhart, vice-president ami man 
ager of The Gurney-Massej Company, 
Limited, Montreal; •). Lockhart, •). 11. 
Wynne and J. E. Carron, salesmen in 
Quebec and the Maritime Provinces; -I 
A Fairbairn, R. G. Wright, A. B. G. 1). 
Tisdale A. G. McNaughton, E. J. Brewer, 
E. C. Hancock, ('. S. Williams and W. L. 
Relliwell, salesmen in Ontario. 

The proceedings opened with remarks by 
President Gurney, Manager Cariick and 
Vice President W. E. Gurney. Then a 
symposium was held, each traveller an I 
manager giving for the benefit of all sug 
gestions on general topics, as well as de- 
monstrations on ranges, stoves and heat- 
IT-. !_:a- rani;''- and goods, and on other 
heating goods. On Wednesday afternoon 
a i-it was made to the new plant, which 
i~ being erected, and which the staff were 
pleased lo see is I j-Ihl; rapidly pushed to 
complef ion. 

The convention terminated in a fitting 
manner on Wednesday evening, when the 
firm banqueted the members at the 
National Club, where, after a thoroughlj 
appreciated repast, oratory, music, and 
Hers' yarns combined to put every- 
body in the best of humor and ready to 
start out on the morrow to do the big 
et recorded, 

FOUNDRY WILL BE ENLARGED 

The St. John Foundry Company, or- 
ganized -a March last, has been so sue 
d that enlargements and extension, 
of the business are now contemplated, 
St. John, N.I'' , i ilobe. The 
company was promoted by -John E. Wil 
son, and its management has been large 
lv in hi-, hands, so the success attained 
may, in a great measure, be attribute I 
to hi and ability. The companv 

started operations in its factory on Bru« 
sels street, with 14 hands, and the busi- 



ness has been conducted under serious 
disadvantages, not the least of these 
being the scarcity of coal. Still, every- 
thing has gone along so satisfactorily, 
that it is now contemplated to lease land 
adjoining the factory, on which an op- 
tion has been obtained, and to build 
thereon an extension in which the grow 
iic business of the company can be 
handled. It is planned to go into the 
manufacture of stoves, ranges, etc., and 
to put on the market a line <>f goods 
that St. Johp will be proud of. Applica 
tion will be made for an increase in the 
capital stock of the company from $G,0C0 
to $20,000, and stock will be offered to 
some of the financial men of the city, 
who may feel like investing in the enter- 
prise. 

THE M'CLARY CO. OF LONDON- 
AFTER THE FIRE. 

Energy and brains aie the most suit- 
able words that can be applied to the 
rapidity and thoroughness with which the 
del iris and the destruction of the recent 
fire have been made to disappear. 

The contracts for rebuilding were all 
made a week ago, and the work is pro- 
gressing i n double-quick time. The inside 
of the burned building is all thoroughly 
cleaned up and new flooring put in, and 
already the stamping machinery is in full 
running order, and every day's output is 
as heavy as at any time prior to the big- 
blaze. 

The branch managers, A. D. Kinnelly, 
of Toronto ; A. A. Brown, of Montreal ; 
and .J. W. Driscoll, of Winnipeg, made 
their annual visit to London to confer 
with the managers there, reviewing the 
business of last year, and planning and 
arranging for L903. 

The reports from the various offices are 
exceedingly gratifying ; the business of 
1902 has been a record-breaker — all pre- 
dicting, too, that the year on which we 
had now entered would exceed the last. 
The outlook for the company is very 
promising. Mrs. Driscoll accompanied her 
husband on his trip east from Winnipeg. 

W. H. L. 
London. . January 21, 1903. 



DIRECTIONS FOR STOVES AND 
FURNACES. 



M'H' 



II comment has been caused of 
late by the fatalities directly due 

coal gas "in badly ventilated 
houses, and the general verdict seems to 
be that man} people are ignorant of the 
proper methods of using then stoves and 

furnaces. 

That, there is much ignorance of this 
matter is well known to all persons in- 
timate with the stove and furnace trade. 
This is often due, in part, to careless 
Hiss on the part of the householder, but 
in many cases a remedy lies with the 
dealer who puts in the stove or furnace. 

It should be an established rule of the 
trade that where a furnace is installed 
directions regarding its use should be 
printed and pasted up as near to it as 
possible. These directions should be so 
clear and comprehensive that the house- 
holder should have no trouble in carry- 
ing them out. It would be best if the 
directions were prepared and printed by 
the manufacturer of the stove, but where 
the maker does not do so, the retailer 
should protect his own interests by do- 
ing it. If this were always done there 
would be less complaint regarding the 
working of furnaces, for often the furnace 
gets the blame for troubles that are due 
solely to ignorance or carelessness on the 
part of the attendant. 

Directions regarding the use of stoves 
are also advisable. It is well known that 
when properly handled a stove will give 
better results, will be more economical 
than when its proper care is not under- 
stood by its owner. The owner, of 
course, blames the stove, whereas if full 
directions were given with the stove such 
trouble would probably be obviated, and 
instead of a dissatisfied customer the 
dealer would have a pleased one. 

AMONG THE TRADE. 

•James Martin, of Gillies & Martin, fotin 
drymen, Listowel, Out., died at his home 
in Teesvvater, on Wednesday, last week, 
aged 68 years. Mr. Martin retired from 
active connection with the Listowel foun- 
dry last summer, on account of his fail 
ing health. 

E. A. Runions, tinware and hardware 
dealer, Cardinal, Out., has sold out to 
J. E. iVfagee, of the same town. Mr. 
Magee is well known in Cardinal and 
vicinity, and should make a success of the 
business 



MANTELS, GRATES and TILE. 

Are any of your customers building a new house ? If so, why not 
try and sell them a mantel as well as hardware ? They will want 
one, and it will pay you. Write us for catalogue and price. 

THE BATTY STOVE & HARDWARE CO. 

76 York St., TORONTO. 

26 



STOVES Wl» TINWARE 



Hardware and Metal 



The Selling Qualities 



The 



Or our splendid range 



Imperial Oxforc 



make them the most desirable stock you 
can handle. 

THEIR DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
FRONT DRAW-OUT ORATE 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

and other improved features, give them a quickly ap- 
preciated precedence over other ranges. 

Housewives everywhere praise them enthusiastically. 

Customers realize their superiority on sight — sales 
are easy. 

They're the popular range of Canada. 

Send us your address at once. 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 



TORONTO. WINNIPEG. 



VANCOUVER. 




THE QURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



Established i&OO. 



" Eureka " 
Cheese Factory, Milk Cans. 



I'a tin i ED i vm \i:v, 1 



Incorporated 1&&5. 




Milk Cans and 
Milk Can Trimmings. 



(See how the outer Rim ainl Inner are rolled in. | 



"FLUSH" 

SIDE 
HANDLES 



Means no more 
bruised, nur 
broken milk 
• is the 
ease wll ii 
protruding 
bandies. 




BROAD HOOP PATTERN. 

Made of tX gauge, in ivntiv hoops. Always supplied 

■wedged unlera ordered otherwise. 
We »!•*> make"Kiireka" i ans, .'I gauge, tritb centre hoops ; 

and old style C'aus with either >lip or rest covers, uwedged 
or not swedged. 



SECTION OF OUR PATENT MIL1\ CAN BOTTOM. 
This demonstrates the popularity of 

Davidson's Patent Milk Can Bottoms. 

\-i >i should hoy our Milk cans and Trimming*, becan*e : our Broad Hoop Bottom has all tii • adt 
■ aramles* bottom without the strain thai spinning entalK Pie rim i- tamed In with edg bottom, giving 

ilonhle dm al> Illy and heavy rolled SdgeS Hint will not tear factory tlnirs nor wn- 

I'hrv have no air ■ aces which make soldi-nut dlmcoll .tint snmdeol space ta left bel 
lim to allow body of ran in be Inserted ', of an Inch, making permanent joint. 

Kottonis are thus sweated in with ball the sold-r. 

Bottom* ate ro ra> e, draining to the centre, therefore are easier to wash out. 

Tiny will DOl COrrod" like those which drain to the side They have rliMi side handles. 

Top bands are " SHOULD] Rl D" and have cnl out at joint, making neater an 
with old style hoop 

All bands have returned ?''■< 

For durability, BnlSb and economy in making up. our Trimmings are nne.ciall.il. 



i bottom proper and 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., ■..-*«• Montreal, P.Q. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




1\ W II) McNAIJ 
/ bead of a tu 



iNAIK, Vancouver, B.C., is 
company which Has paid 

111, for a site on Barrard In- 

on which they will erect a large 
-- 1 1 i 1 1 lt 1 « * mill. 



Iph Bailwaj Company is asking 
for power to establish the Guelph Radial 
Railway, with connections, embracing 
Elora, Fergus, Arthur, Mount Forest, 
Erin, Puslinch Lake, Gait, Hespeler, an<l 
Preston, and for legislation to enable the 
ratepayers of the city of Guelph to sub- 
scribe for ^25,000 stock in the same. 

The last Manitoba Gazette gives notice 
that The Manitoba Windmill and Pump 
Company, Limited, of Brandon, seeks in- 
corporation at a capital of 920,000, to 
deal in pumps, windmills, and machinery. 
The applicants are .J . McBiarrnid, Tru- 
man Newton, 0. F-. Williamson, J. M. 
Biesberry and L. E. Williamson, all of 
Brandon. 

London, Out., papers announce that the 
city c\pc,ts a building boom in the 
spring. As for Brantford, says The 
Courier, the place is too much on the 
hustle to wait for spring conditions. 
Bight in midwinter, the large new Gock- 
shutt Plow factory is in course of rapid 
construction ; the doubling of The Pratt 
and Letchworth works is in full swing, 
and new houses are making their appear- 
ance on all si' 

The local unions constituting the To- 
ronto \btal Council will be more or less 
involved in a general movement for the 
adoption of the nine-hour day: Pattern 
makers, molders, coremakers, machinists, 
brass workers, metal polishers, boilermak- 
ers, and iron shipbuilders, blacksmiths, 
electrical workers, and the allied metal 
mechanics. In all these trade special eff- 
orts have been directed during the past 
year towards strengthening their organ 
izations, and the metal workers now lie 
they are strong enough to enforce 
their demands. 

\t the C.P.R. Board meeting on Mon- 
day, last week, it was decided to go on 
with the Areola, Alta., extension as soon 
as the spring- opens up. The contract 
for the work has not yet been awarded, 
but the president says contractors are 
now looking over the plotted line, which 
from Regina to Areola. G. E. Jeykel, 

of Montreal, who constructed some por- 
tion of Sir William Van Home's Santi 
ago de Cuba Railway, has been up there 

and exp< t the contract, or a 



portion thereof, Work will commence 
from the Regina end, and hundreds of 
team-, principally mules, will be engaged 
in the work. 

OTTAWA STEEL CASTING COMPANY. 

The Baldwin Iron Works on Bridge 
street have changed hands. They have 
been purchased by a newly formed con- 
cern known as The Ottawa Steel Casting 
Company. One of the moving spiiits in 
the new concern is Aid. Askwith. The 
present premises will be extended, blast 
furnaces put in, and a general business 
done in foundry and steel-casting work. 
The industry already gives employment 
to a good number of men, but it is prob- 
able that as a result of the change and 
extension of the business the staff will 
be considerably increased. The new com- 
pany has great faith in the industrial 
development of the Chaudiere. 



PEERING WORKS TO START SOON. 

Manager Kennedy, of the Deering divis- 
ion, International Harvester Company of 
America, Hamilton, Ont., states that as 
soon as the necessary electric power can 
be supplied them by The Cataract Power 
Company, they would be ready to stai t 
operations. It is expected that The Cat- 
aract Company will be able to furnish 
the necessary electric energy during the 
coming week. The work on the several 
big buildings now in process of construc- 
tion is being rapidly pushed forward, the 
contractors taking every advantage of 
the present mild weather. Several of the 
heads of factory departments are now in 
the city, and it will not be many days 
before active operations are begun at the 
big institution. 

BISY PORT ARTHl'R. 

The merchants of Port Arthur are look- 
ing forward to a busy summer. Rumors 
are afloat of a large amount of work 
which is to be gone on with at this 
place, commencing early in the spring, 
among which is said to be the erection of 
a storage elevator by the C.P.R. ; an- 
other elevator and coal docks by the C. 
\. I!., and other improvements by these 
two companies, which will give employ- 
ment to considerable labor. There is al- 
io a possibility of The Pigeon River 
I. timber Company increasing their large 
industry by the election of a number of 
wooden manufactories, which would mean 
a large influx of labor to this place. 



There is to be a lot of building, as at 
the present time contracts have been It 
for a number of modern dwellings, and it 
is not unlikely that the business blocks 
will be added to. 



A NEW STEEL COMPANY. 

A Sydney, N.S., correspondent writes 
that a company, The Canadian Steel and 
Coal Company, have organized to carry- 
on business there. The company have 
acquired an interest in the Cape Breton 
Railway, formerly owned by The Domin- 
ion Securities Company ; also the pro- 
perty known as the New Campbellton 
Mines, and 4,000 acres of iron-ore depos- 
its at tidewater in Quebec. It is the in- 
tention of the company to develop on a 
large scale coal properties in this county, 
and ultimately to establish a large iron 
and steel industry, either in Quebec or 
Cape Breton, but probably in the latter 
place. The company's property in Ca| e 
Breton covers about 12,000 acres and they 
own about 5,000 acres in Quebec. 

Natashquan, in Quebec, where the com- 
pany owns iron properties, is situated on 
the north shore of the St. Lawrence, op- 
posite the Island of Anticosti. This shore, 
for hundreds of miles, contains deposits 
of magnetic iron, which have been worked 
to some extent in days gone by and ex 
perimented with from time to time, but 
never with any degree of success owing 
to the property contained in this iron, 
titanium, as it is called. 



MR. STARR RETIRES. 

January 31 ends the business year of the 
firm of C. E. Starr & Son, hardware 
merchants, Wolfville, N.S. After that date 
C. E. Starr »etires from the firm, in which 
he has been actively engaged for over 30 
years The business will be taken over by 
Illsley & Harvey, while G. S. Starr, son 
of C. E. Starr, retains an interest. 

A number of improvements will be 
made in the building for the further con- 
venience of the firm in conducting their 
growing business, and the salesroom will 
also be enlarged. 

The firm have sent out to their customers 
a circular announcing this change, and 
also offering special bargains during this 
month. 

Mr. Starr has well earned a rest after a 
long and active career as an honorable 
business man, and we hope, with all who 
know him, that he may live long to 
enjoy it. 

Illsley & Harvey, who succeed him, 
have the name of being energetic and ex- 
perienced men. There is no doubt of their 
being successful. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MFTAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIPFK ULTIES, LSSIGNMEN I 3, l OW 
PR0HIS1 - 

At ll \ I III. mortj agee i in 
ton of the took ol ll I M 
bardwai mt, of [*oronto 

Parker & ' '<• ■ general merchante, ol 
Bawkeebury, have aeeigned to \ Ha 
.1. i. St. Lrmand, general merchant, t>( 
ienevieve de Batiscan, Que., ha 
signed to P. P. Martin. 
I e ]i phore Pellef iei . genei al men hanl . 
Chatte, Que . is offa tag to oodj 
promise at 15c. <>ii the dollar. 

A meeting ol the creditora ol C. G 
I-', .Ik. ,1 merchant, ol Shanoti I 

Out., will be held on January 22. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND 
DISSOL\ ED 

1 1„. St Henri La V oi tui iei . Ferreur, 
tgemakers, of St. Henri de Montreal, 
Que . lia\ a diseoh ed pai tnership. 
Allen \. Mcl\oi, hardware merchanl , 
rich, (int., have dissolved partnei 
ship, ( ;<-orge L. Allen continuing. 

Johnson & Beeette, general merchants. 
Village Richelieu, Que, have dissolved 
partnership ; a new partnership has been 
registered 

Robert Mcintosh, agricultural imple 
inent and lumber merchant, of Saska- 
\ \\ 1'., is admitting his brother 
into partnership. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING 

phen Smith, general merchant, of 
Maryland, Que., has sold out. 

Tho business of S. J. Bond, harness 
dealer, Mount Brydges, Out., is for sale. 

Currie & Hut laud, agricultural imple- 
ment agents, Souris, Man., have sold out. 

Sivain >.v, Emerson, harness dealers, of 
Roland, Man . have -o,d out to David 
Hardy, 

Norman Fanson, harness dealer, Pilot 
Mound. Man., has sold out to G. W. 
Brisbin. 

I M. Mai shall, hardware merchant, 
Sarnia, (int.. has sold out to Conse A: 
Uongv ie. 

Herman Goski, general merchant, Cop 
Ont., has sold out to John R. 
McKinnon. 

I,' \> llamill, agricultural implement 
irlyle, Man., has sold out to 
Lawlor & 

The stock of William 1 1 \ in- (estate of), 
bard< rchant, Austin, Man., has 

been Bold to Napiei 

\ l Stockwell, hardware and imple 
in, -nt merchant, Bsteran, N.W.T., has sold 
out the implement bush 

G Grondin, general merchant and hotel 
r, of Notre Dame du Portage, Que . 
advertises his hotel for sale. 

NEW FIRMS wii in UNGES. 

1 D. Fontaine & Co., St. Cyrille de 
Wendover, have registered as general mer- 
chants. 

G. V. Hodgins, general merchant, of 
Shawville, Que., is opening a branch at 
land. 

The Manitoba Windmill and Pump Co., 
Limited, Brandon, Man., are applying for 
in. oi poration. 

J. L. Gibson, agricultural implement 
agent, Wolseley and Sintaluta, N W T 
has been succeeded by (>. Tourigny. 



I be I ■ I Baird Co., Limited, lumbei 
and general store merchanl , of Perth, 
\ T, , are applying for incorporation, 

l he Mai i ineau Co., manufai > 
iron, Quebec, are applying for a charter. 
T. < !opeland, Imrdw ari int, Win 

gOI M ol I'H i 

The Marshall-Wells Company, who! 
hardware mei ohai I Wii are ap 

plying for authoritj to increa e then 

capital from f60,000 to 1600,000. 

BTR] - 

The plant of The Hamilton Powdci 

Company, Montreal, at Beloeil, has been 
burned. 

.1. 1). Frier, general merchant, Water 
ford, N.B., ha- been burned out; parti 
ally insured, 

I he Pec! R ■ 1 1 i 1 1 u Mills ( lompany, Mont 
real, nail manufacturers, have been 
burned out ; insured. 

Tho stock of Leader & Parsons, general 
merchants, Quyon, Que., 1ms been slightly 
damaged by fire ; insured. 

1)1 \ IDS. 

J. U. Ireland, general merchant. Gout 
ock, Ont., is dead. 

Walter Mullet t. of the firm of Walter 
Mullett it Son, blacksmiths, Bancroft, 
Ont., is dead. 

lion, A. G. Wood, of the firm ol Wood. 
Valance & Co., wholesale and retail hard 
waro merchants, Hamilton, Ont., and of 
Geo. D. Wood & Co., wholesale hardware 
merchants, Winnipeg, is dead. 



DEATH OF THE OLDEST RAILROAD 
LOCKMAKER. 

THOMAS SLAIGHT, president of The 
Thomas Slaight Lock and Manufac 
turing Company, of Newark, VI. 
died on Sunday, January I, 1903, at the 
age of 83 years. He was born in New 
York City. January 8, 1820. 

At the early ng-e of 15 years (in 1835), 
he apprenticed with Dr. Sol. Andrews, 
who. at that time, was a celebrated lock 
manufacturer at Perth Amboy, N.J. In 
1841, he went with Day. Newell & Day, 
bank lock manufacturers in New York 
City. In 1844 he came to Newark to 
take charge of the plant of Henry C. 
Jones, whose specialty was padlocks. 

In July, IS 10, Mr. Slaight started in 
business for himself, and from the start 
he was so successful, that, in 1866, ]|,. 
Iiuilt and occupied the large buildin 
113-115 N.J.R.R. Ave., where bis business 
is still located. His specialties were the 
various styles of railroad locks of the 
fineei grade, and also Government] locks. 
I" Mai h, 1001, on account of advancing 
Slaight incorporated his busi 
Dees under the name of The Thomas 
■it Lock tend Manufacturing Co., he 
being mad.- the president. 

Davi I Slaight, who has been a 
i with his father in the business for 
nearly '2" years, will succeed him as preari 
dent of the company. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO 
LIMITED. 

Vi:i PRJ 31 NTAT1 
and \|, t ick, 

on ,i ret 'lit 'in to the > t 
,.i I he I' Gn ening Wire ' ompanj . Lim 
ited, Hamilton, Ont., with the imn 
growth within the l"-t 12 month 
now occupy their handsome and 
modioua offices which the) have buill up 
on the it'- of the old office, occupied !>y 
them for t he last 10 yeai . and from the 
increa a in the - 1 ,itT employed < her* . 
would givt idea ol t iti 

Then i a | ■•■■ ial 1 I rick 

building put up thii year for the d 

111, t Ul .; of POUltrj will' li 

lmvo only been makinj . bul 

which ha- gained such a reputation on 

the market that thej have already had 
to put up th ial building and 

double their plant, and now tin;, 
fully sold up to their Capacity Dp to tie 

end ol March. They have added 

ly to their weaving plant, and put 

up a in'w tower for painting flj cloth, 
which alters the appearance of the build 
hilt altogether 

This firm ha\e now been manufacturing 
wire rope and weaving heavy cloth for 
upwards of 60 years, and can justly 
claim to be not only pioneers in thai 
line of business, but also in wire draw 
They manufacture every class of 
wire for all purposes, besides the products 
of wire, such as witr topi- of different 
grades, wire doth from the hen 
mining screens, Blab or refuse burner tops 
for sawmills, all kinds of drying floor-, 
such as oatmeal and malt kiln, woollen 
and cotton-drying Hoots, for grain clean- 
inw machinery in ^li^t mills, thrt 
machines and fanning mills, down to thi- 
nnest wire cloth. 

\l-o, perforated metals in steel, zinc, 
brass, copper and aluminum, and, it 
everything that can be made in wire. 

The firm are descendants from an old 
family in England that have alwaj 
in the wire business, Nathanael I 
having started the linn that is in exi-t 
ence to day at Warrington, England, in 
1700. The pre-, 'nt firm here, having 

• 1 by Benjamin in 1858 

and incorporated by hi 
in-, president of the pi impany, in 

1889 

The firm have a warehouse at No. 122 
St. Paul street, Montreal, for tl 

of their eastern where 

they ha\e ti full line of everything 
manufacture, with •' H 11 
charge, but all the manul and 

bookkeeping i- don,- at thi 

in Hamilton. 



Hamelin Bros. ral m>r 

chants, of Melita, U ■■ applying for 

incorporation. 



Hardware and Meltil 




T 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January 23, l'.»03. 

HARDWARE. 

\\)\ the past week has Un 

proved considerably, and orders for 
ng delivers are coming to hand 
in large oumbers. A fair business i> 
in the sorting up trade, and 
v this trade is better than it 
[or years. There has been a 
decline of 10c. per LOO lb. in barb wire, 
and all shipments, as well as stock on 
will !).■ guaranteed until May I. 
There i- also some talk of a duty being 
placed <>n barb wire in March. Mis. 
Potts' -ad irons, both plated and plain. 
have advanced about 5 >■ Stan 

ley planes air about ■"> to 8 pei cent, 
higher, and levels, about 10 to 15 F er 
cent. There arc also a couple of changes 
in galvanized wire, that we would draw 
to the attention of our leaders. At 
present there is every indication of a 
heavy spring trade, as already there Is 
quite a movement in freezers, harvest 
tools, shovels and spa des, wire cloth. 
barb wire, fence wire, spring hinges and 
lawn mower--. 

LAWN MOWERS. A few orders have 
conic to hand during the week. Prices 
are as follows : 10^-in. wheel by 12-in 
cutter. $7.50; by 11-inch cutter, $8.00 ; 



by Hi - inch do, 88.50 ; by 18-inch 
do, S'J.OO ; by 20 inch do, $10.00. 
Star. 9-inch wheel bv 12-inch cutter, 
85.50; by 11-inch do, 85.75 ; by 16-inch 
Daisy, 8-inch wheel by 12-inch 

si. '.in fby 

do, 85.30 

wheel by 



cutter, 
16-inch 

74-inch 



inch wheel by 
14-inch do, 85.10 ; by 
Philadelphia pattern, 
10-inch cutter, $6 ; bv 
12-inch do, 86.50; by 14-inch do, $7; by 
16 inch do, 87.50. Grass boxes are quot- 
ed as follows : 12- inch, 82.25 ; 14-inch, 
$2.25; Hi-inch, $2.50: 18-inch, 82.50; 20- 
inch, 82.75. The discount on all the 
above is 50 per cent. off. 

BARB WIRE.— There is a small move- 
ment in this line, and spring trade is 
about to start. A decline in price will 
be noticed in our quotations. We quote: 
s-J.sn per Kid lb., f.o.b. Montreal ; 82.45 
f.o.b.. Cleveland, in carlots of 15 tons; 
$2,674 fob-. Cleveland, in smaller lots. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— There is very 
little doing in galvanized wire, and the 
market is steady. Cur quotations are 
as follows: No. 5, S.',.70 ; Nos. 6, 

7 and 8, $3.15; No. 9, S2.55 ; No. 
in, $3.20; No. 11. $3.25; No. 12. 82.65; 
No. 13, 82.75; No. II. $3.75. In carlots. 
f.o.b. Cleveland : No. 5, $2.20; Nos. 6, 7, 

8 and 9, 82.15; No. 10, $2.20; No. 11, 
$2.25; No. 12, $2.30; No. 13, 82.40; No. 
II s-2.50. In less than carlots, 12^c. per 
100 lb. extra is charged. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— The market 



remains quiet and prices are unchanged. 
We quote: Bright and annealed, $2.50 
pei 100 lb. f. o. b. Montreal. Toronto, 
Halifax, London, Hamilton and St. John 
Net extras per 100 lb. are now as fol- 
lows : Coppered wire, G0c; tinned wire, 
$2 ; oiling-, 10c; spring wire, $1.25 ; best 
steel wire, 75c; bright soft drawn, 15c; 
special hay-baling wire, 30c 

FINE WIRE. — Very few orders are beinii 
received. The discount is still 25 per 
cent, with the following extras : 1 and 2"- 
1b. hanks, 25c per 100 lb.; \-Yb. hanks, 
37-Jc. and £-lb. hanks, 50c 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE.— The 
market is slow in both these lines, and 
the discount remains at <>2.', per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES.— Spring orders are 
commencing to arrive for fence staples. 
Our quotations are: 83 per 100-fb. kec.- for 
galvanized staples and $2.80 for bright, 
with 25c extra for 25 and 50-lb. pack 
ages. 

WIRE NAILS.— Trade continues to be 
quiet, and the prices are unchanged. We 
quote: Carlots, $2.40, and small lots at 
$2.45 per keg f.o.b. Montreal, London, 
Hamilton, Toronto, Brantford, Windsor, 
(Int., and St. John. 

CUT NAILS.— The market is somewhat 
improved. Tn carlots, the price is $2.10 
per keg and in small lots, $2.15 per keg. 

HORSE NAILS.— Prices remain firm 
and a few orders are being received for 




FLARING PATTERN. 



Maple Syrup Season Goods 

You may just as well handle the best known and most satisfactory lines 
of these goods and win the confidence and trade of your customers. 

SAP PAILS 

We make them in both straight and flaring patterns— three sizes in eaeh. 

• ' EUREKA CAST IRON SAP SPILES 

are well known and acknowledged to be the best in Canada. 

PROflPT SHIPHENT GUARANTEED 




THE McCLARY MANUFACTURING CO. 

" Everything for the Tinshop." 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, AND ST. JOHN, N.B. 

3< I 



THE MARKETS 



//tin/-., a re tintt ^/i tut 



ENGLISH 

GERMAN 

BELGIAN 

CANADIAN 

AMERICAN 

FIRE 

BUILDING 

ENAMELLED 

SILICA 

MAGNESIA 

DRAIN 
CULVERT 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS. 



BRICKS. 



1 PIPES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 




Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

(he CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON. OUT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS QUE 



Deseronto Iron Co, 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleab'e 
pgs, Boiler Tubes. Engine Cylinders, I In 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is r. quired ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, f jr Fou:uir\ 
Purposes. 



u 



MIDLAND 



5J 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with l onnellsville Coke as Fuel. "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Pries to Sites Agents 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 
or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT, 



Limited 



small lol We qnot< thi 
follow "I " bi and, I". 10 and ~ ■ 
cent, i iii; mi "M" brand, "Oval," '<l\ per 
ii'iit. ; " New City," 51 J i" i ' 'Hi . 
Countersunk," ft pei oent.; "Monarch," 
66 i"'i cenl ; Peer! " 50 and 7$ per 

BOBS] SHOl - \ I'm I i do 

, ii I i he I'M' are teat ly. w e quote 
as follow b: I i "" hot light • liuni, 

pattern, No. 2 ami largei 13.36 No. i 
and ■mailer, 13.60 ; snow pattern, No. 2 
and larger, |3.60; No. 1 ami smaller, 
13.86 : X L steel shoes, new light pat- 
tarn, sizes I t<> 6, No. 2 and larger, 
|3 16 . \". I and smaller, 13.70 ; teathi i 
weight, all si/cs, to 4, 85; toe weight, : 
all si/rs. I to I. 16.25. Shoes, more than 
one size in a keg, 10c. per l-oi^ extra 
f.o.li. Montreal only. 

IM\ kts Wli I'.l RRS. The mark* 
and few orders are being booked 
The discounts are quoted as follows I 
iron rivets, section carriage and wagon 
box, black rivets, tinned do., coopers' 
rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 60 and 
10 per cent. ; s\ve<les iron burrs are quot 
cd at 55 per cent, of? ; copper rivets. 
with the usual proportion of burrs, 4fi j 
per cent, off and coppered iron rivets and 
burrs, in 5-lb. carton boxes are quoted ' 
at fiO and 10 [>cr cent, off list. 

BOM 3 WH \i TS There is nothing 
new to report tliis week. Discounts arc: 
Norway carriage bolts, 55 per cent. : 
common. 50 per cent ; full square car- 
riage bolts, 55 per cent.: machine bolts 
50 and 5 per cent.: coach screws, 66 2-3 
per cent. ; sleirdishoe bolts, 65 and 5 
per cent.; blank bolts, 50 and 5 per j 
cent.: bolt ends. 50 and 5 per cent. ; j 
plouph bolts, 50 and 5 per cent. To any • 
retailer an extra discount of 10 per cent 
is allowed. Tire bolts, 67i tier cent. ; | 
stove bolts, 67* per cent. Nuts, square. 
:Uc per 11). off list: hexatron nuts. 3?c. | 
per In. off list. To all retailers an extra j 
discount of ic. per Tb. is allowed. 

SCREWS.- The discounts remain the | 
same and trade is quiet. Prices follow-: 
Hound head bright, 82$ and 10 per cent.; 
flat head bright, 87* and 10 per cent. ; 
brass, round heads, 75 and 10 per cent.; 
brass, Bat heads, 80 and 10 per cent. 

CORDAGE. There is no change to note 

week. Quotations are as follows: 

Pure manila, 11c; British pure manila. 

12c.; sisal, lie.; double lathvarn, lie; 

Single latin. tin. lOic. 

I'd II DING I'M'I'l; A few future ord- 
ers are being booked, otherwise the mar- 
kel is quiet, and our quotations arc 
as follows: Tarred Felt, si. 75 per 
100 tl).; 2-ply, readv-roofing, 00c. per roll; 
3 plj . -•' 15 pa roll arpet felt, S2.-J" 
|i»i lb.; dry sheathing, 35c. per roll; tar 
sheathing, 15c. per roll; dry fibre. 
per roll; tarred fibre, 60c. per roll, K 
and 1 \ I . 65o. per roll; heavy straw and 
sheathing, $30 per ton; slaters' felt, 60c. 
per roll. 

RE-EN WIRE CLOTH.-The spring 
trade is opening for Bcreen wire cloth. 
and the prices are quite firm. The price 
quoted is 11.40 per 100 square feet. 

I [REBRII KS The prices remain on 
changed. We quote: English, sit; | 

and Scotch, 817 to 122 per 1,000. 

CEMENT. The cement market is quiet, 
and very little business is being done 
Our quotations are as follow- Can 
adian cement, tl '■' ll to 12.25; German, 

, English, *'J 16 to - 
Belgian, si 70 to fl.96 per barrel ex 
store, and \ - - 20 ox- 

cars. 

81 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

Ill VIIIM VIM I l?S I OtV 

IRON, STEEL 

and METALS 

BEST BRANDS AT LOW PRICES TO 
WHOLESALE BUYERS. 

SANDERSONS STEEL IN STOCK. 



509-512 Merchant* Bank Building. 
MONTREAL. 

A Scheme to Make Money 

We are In bnslni 

make mom 

an- you 

li sod are handling 

our line (if 

PUMPS 

you are making money, 

-'• then- It a good 

profit in tii. -in for you, 
and then jrou never 

hear any complaints 

about them. 

If you are not handl- 
ing them you bad bet- 
ter write us and find 
out all about this mom 
ey-making scheme. — ~ 

The R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

QALT. ONT. 
Pomp Manufacturers. \\ 1 Ite for 1 SatsJogae. 



Pig Tin. 



"Boustead £* Co's" Penang 

"Straits" 

"Lamb and Flag" 




—"Lake" 
—"HA" 



Copper 
Galvanized Sheets. 



ADAM HOPE & CO, 

Hamilton. Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., lmm 

NEW GLASGOW, U.S. 

MmmmHetmrmn t i 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

Aid SIEMENS sLa-RTIl 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



ffan l mm rt mmd \letnl 



THE MARKETS 



SNOW Sllit\ ELS \ few sorting up 
orders are being received, and tbe prices 
as follows " Habitant," 12.26 to 
; •• Victor." I" per cent. otT ; 
railroad shovels, I s and "» per cent. off. 

FIRE SHO> ELS. Inere is still a fair 
business being >ii>in- in fire shovels. The 
Miits remain unchanged: No 70, 
r dozen; No. 55, 55 to 60c; 
\,.'. 57, 82J to 90c; No. CO. 82| to 00c; 
Nfo 65, si :CA to $1.46; No. SO, 50 to 
"Duple*," No. 7. 11.21; No. 9. 
_'. No. II. fl.82. 
BOCKE'S STICKS. A. few small orders 
are still being received by the jobbers. We 
quote : Bes1 second - growth, goal keep 
I per doz.; ash. 82.90; elm, 32.25; 
boys' elm, 81.10; common, 90c. Regula 
tion pucks, 81.50 per doz. 

COM. HODS— The trade in coal hods 
i- about finished for the season. Prices 
follow: Japanned, 16 in., S4.50 per doz.; 
17-in.. 14.80; IS in., S5.10; with gold band, 
17-in., 85.10; lS-in., 85740. Galvanized, 
16-in.. 16.20: 17 in.. S6.50; 18-in., 86.80 per 
doz. The discount is 45 per cent. 

LANTERNS.— A fair trade is doing in 
this line at our last quotations. We 
quote as follows: Tilt, lift or hinge, No. 0, 
84 per doz.; Cold Rlast, 87 per doz.; dash- 
board, N<>. 0. 85.75 per dozen ; cold-blast 
dashboard. 39 per dozen. Extras are as 
follows : Japanning, 50c per dozen ; cop 
per-plating cold blast, 82 per dozen. The 
prices quoted are f.o.b. London, Hamil- 
ilton, Toronto, Belleville, Kingston and 
Montreal. 

METALS. 

Tim demand for heavy metals is increas- 
ing, and pi<j load, pig- tin and pig copper 
aro all firmer. The pig-iron markets have 
been none too active, although we hear 
of a few laree orders. All Canadian fur- 
naces are still behind with their orders 
for some months, and some supplies of 
Scotch piq: iron have been imported, 821 
to 824.50 Heine' quoted for No. 2 Summer- 
lee, and $23.50 for Calder, net terms. 
Sheet, zinc is now quoted at 85.75 to 86. 
On the foreign markets higher prices are 
beine asked for pio- iron, but it is doubt- 
ful if any business has been done under 
them. Structural iron and steel is in 
active movement, though manufacturers 
have now, for the most part, caught up 
with the demand and prompt deliveries 
are no longer insisted upon, except in a 
few cases. Bar iron is expected to be- 
come firmer. Canada plates on the Ens 
lish market are strengthening, and have 
advanced 2s. 6d. per ton. Terne plates 
have also advanced 6d. per box, and in 
sympathy, a firmer feeling is noticeable 
here. Black sheets, although there has 
been no actual advance in prices, are very 
firm on the foreign markets, and higher 
values may be anticipated. Tn tinplates, 
the foreign market has advanced 1-J to 
1d. per box, and the market is steady 
and firmer. 

BAR IRON.- Trade i~ fair, and the mar- 
ket is looked upon as somewhat firmer. 
We quote : Merchants' liar, $2 ; horseshoe 
iron. 82.25 ; forged iron. S9.20. 

BLACK SHEETS.— Trade is fair and 
prices steadv. Quotations are as fol- 
lows : 2S gauge, $2.65 ; 26 gauge, S2.60 ; 
20 to 21 e&»- 2.50 ; S to 20 gauge, 
82.50. 

GALVANIZED IRON. -Business is quiet 
and the prices remain unchanged. We 
quote : No. 28, Queen's Head, $4.40; 
Apollc, l0$-oz . 8-1.30; Fleur de Lis, 
$4.15: Comet, 84.10; -Bell" brand 84.05. 
For less than case lots 25c. extra is char- 
ged. 




NICHOLSON F-|L_E 

PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 

Cast Steel FILES and RASPS, High Grade 

FOR HOME AND EXPORT TRADE. 

Largest File Manufacturers in the World 

Seven Distinct factories. 



The well-known "Nicholson " and " X. F." brands are made exclusively at 
our Providence works from best selected steel, by experienced workmen, 
and are exported to all parts of the globe, and command the highest prices. 



DOMINION WORKS 



F>ORT MOF»E, CANADA. 

Daily production : 6oo dozen, including " Globe," " Kearney & Foot," and other brands. 

Walter Grose, selling Agent, Montreal. 



THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Set and Cap Screws, Speoial Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 




CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 



NEW YORK OFFICE, 90 Chambers St. 
NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 

Not connected witn any Shear Combination. 

SOLDER. 

Half-and-Half, Wire, Bar, Angle, and Plumbers — all grades. 
IF YOU USE, DROP US A LINE. 



THE CANADA METAL CO., S£j£r? TORONTO. 

IF YOU WANT LIGHT AT SMALLEST COST 

Use "Brilliant" or "Radiant Shelby" Incandescent Lamps 



Special Prices to Large Lighting Companies. 
Walter Grose, 

Selling Agent, Montreal. 
32 



Manufactured by 

The Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Canada. 



THE MA UK I I - 



llnriln nrr <m«/ MtUil 



I I \ h PIP] I !.. i. is a (air l.u 

doue. < !ompo ii ii 'ii and n n rte ni ■ 

quoted .11 Be. .in.i ordinary at 7c The 
di«Ci iun1 • i • 'nt . 

iko.N PIPE. 1 l.o market is fairlj m 

usr and tin- price remain about the 

Standard pipe, pai 100 (eat, 

in I. ii- I U iiihI.i I'.' I., i black, ^ , 

1 , i, ^.(io, a. i ii. . 

v, jii. i I . >, .:... i :■.. fa ■''., 2 in., tl 
Ualvanizi 15 j j, | 

5 . i in.. tf -I' . i ; . »1U ".; . 14, |12.- 

M , J null, Slti.S."). Iwlra heavy pine. 

plain finis, are quoted per lou ieet :.s 
follows . Black, .J, $4.2U . ,. $5 -•"> . 1 in., 
I i, $12.76 ; 1 in., SIT. 
1 ..iU anixed, .} , $6.21 B ti.J> , I in., 

.y.i :.o , 1;. >i. ;_'.•.'; l.j, sit;, 2-in.,, ¥21.90. 
l..i thread and couplings 5 per cent, is 
added. 
1 1 N 1 ■ l . v 1 I SS. The local market is etill 
teadj .mil lam, while uu mhuucu baa 
1 place "ii tin' foreign markets. We 
quote . Cokes, (4.26 and charcoals, $4.75 
to 15.35. 

SOIL PIPE A\H III LINGS.— The mar- 
ke1 is verj quiet and prices letnain un- 
changed. Discounts are as follows : Light 
■oil pipe, •'> i" 6-inoh, 50 uer cent.; me 
ilium and extra heavy soil pipe, 2 to o- 
iiuh, (>u pei cent.; extra beavy soil pipe, 
a inch, l") per cent.; ii:dit littings, 2 to 0- 
inoh, oU and III per cent.; medium and 
extra heavy bttingSj '2 to 6-inch, 00 per 
..■nt extra beavy fittings, 8-inch, 45 per 
cent. 

PIG IRON. The market is firm. We 
quote 123.50 to $24.50, ex-store, Mont- 
teal. 

INGOT COPPEB. Uu' market contm 
uea to be firm. We quote $13.60 to $14.50 
per mo lb. 

INGOT 11V The market remains the 
same as last week. We quote $30 to $32 
per 100 lb. 

PIG LEAD. — The market is quite firm. 
In carlots, the price is $2.90, and in 
small lots, $3. 25 . 

STEE1 A few orders are being booked 
for Bteel, and the markel is firmer than a 
week ago. Our quotations are as fol- 
lows: Sleiedishoe, S2.IH to $2.20; tin , 
$2 20 to $2 25 . bar, $2.05 . spring, $2.85 
I; reeled machinery. i>"2.75 ; toecalk, 
$2.60 '•• $2.90; machinery (iron finish), 
$2 10; mild steel, $2.06; square harrow, 
$2 15. 

NX)] ST] EL. — There is a small move- 
ment in tool steel, and the market is 
steady. Our quotations are as follows: 
Black Diamond. Be.; Sanderson's, 8 to 
irding to the grade; Jessop's, 

Leonard J loiia- & ( olver's, 

\ ii llai dening," 66c. per It. 

CANADA PLATES rhe market U -till 
quite firm, and a fair trade is doing in 
galvanized plates, We quote as fol 
lows 52s, $2.70 to $2.80 ; 60s 
$2.90; 75s, $2.80 to $2.85; full polishpl, 
$3 .•'• and galvanized, $4 2.*> t.. $4 35 
vanized 70s, * I 15 to $4 66. 

TERNE PLATES In sympathy with 
the foreign markets, a firmer feeling pre 
vails on the local market We quote 
$7 .".ii 

C01J ' II \l\ V brisk demand contin 
in roil chain. Quotations art 
follows Mb 6, 10c; No 5, 9 No i 
No 3, 7 ; ii. G li. ; .". 16, 

S Hi exact, $6.25 ; |, $4 30 ; T It;. 
$4.10 ; '.. M . 9 16, $3 80 $3.7l 

$3.60 | 56 ; I in., $3.50. In carload 

lots an allowance of 10c. is made. 

8HEET ZINC \ ilighl advai 
noticeable in this market. We quofc - 
to $6 



EASTLAKE SHINGLES 



ARE SO EASY TO HANDLE. 

They fit together perfectly by means of their patent 
side lock — can be quickly laid by any handy man — - 
and last so long, bein^ absolutely Fire, Rust, Leak, 
and Lightning Proof. These are the points that 
commend them to your customers. 

You're not doing all the business you might do, 
unless you keep Eastlakes in stock. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 



TORONTO. 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG. 



ZINC SPELTER, ["here is nothin 
ins in this market. We quote $5.25. 
SOLDEK \ fair trade is doing in sol 

nid the market is steady. We quote 
as follows Bar -older. 20c, and wire 
-older. 18c. 

RAW FURS. 

The London sales take place this 
an I Canadian prices will probably be re 
gulated accordingly, toward the end of 
the week or a little later. At present 
there is no change Good prices prevail 
all around on this market and offerings 
are increasing, including coon skins, 
which are nol as it was thought 

would lie. With the increased 
ceipts then- is also a noticeable improve 
meiit in the quality of the skins offering. 
A Montreal dealer is said to have paid 
$90 recently for the skin of a black fo\. 
We quote : 



SCRAP METALS 
There is a good amount of bud 
being done a t present, and 
the market quite firm. Considerable ship 
ments bave been made ,,f late. Quota 
tions are still as follow.-. Beavy copper 
and wire, 9c. per II. ; li-ht copper, t>c, 
heavy red brass, 10c. ; heavy yellow, 
light brass, 5c.; lead. 2 to 2£c.; ,„ 

c; iron. No. ! wrought, $16 to $16; 
No. J. $7 per ton; machinery scrap. $16 ■ 
to $17; jtoye plate, $13; malleabli 
steel. $6; mixed country rags, 60 to 70c. 
per 100 lb.; old rubbei -. iW. to 6*; . per 
pound. 

HIDES. 
Hide- last week were Jc. lower than 

our quotations. This week has shown no 
further decline, but tbi 

steadiei . and leathers ,,f bJ] ..,,, t,, 

be tinner. Lambskin- *1ia\e advanc?d to 



FISHER Eastern and fai North-Eaatern. 
Territory and Western 



POX 



i-.i wii: Labrador and choice EaBtern $6.00 

ky Mountains and Western 

Siri. ily Prime, or. No. 1 

Partly Prime, No. 2 

t'ii].rniM. V :i i»i 

Plat, weak, or poor, "r. No i 

Lane 

BE \t: Black Choice onlj 

Brown 1100 

1 
BAIX11 l: oi all Motions 

LOO 

■ - Value principall] 10.00 
silv.-r Eastern and far Northern 
" Pacific l ' W ' " 

LYNX Pi N 

i sritorj and Westeru I 

D 
M villi n British Columbia, Northern Pacific aod similar r.00 

Torritorj and w. su m 
c and Ontarii 

MINK H ni ami choid I "' 

TVn '■'• Hern i 

Spring 

Ml -<K I: \ I I tall rn. U-l Ii.Tk'. 

Trrrilery and \V. -i.-rn 



Me.li in Small 

- 



•rim LOO 

100 

2.00 

Mr.li m 

I 

•.hi 
'.' 

Hi 



4ii 



38; 

3 



md -iiiiilnr fine bruihl red Unda 

i w em 



*nmll 



1 m 
20.00 



M.-.11 in Small 

■j tola 



4 
2.00 

2100 
15.00 



l 
- 
I ni 






"li n: i. i ... • ,,„i f„ r N.,n! . 
Terril item 



-M-ll 



R W ...in 

". -tinn t.> darkness, size and 

-KINK 

Dark 
WOLVERINE Valnea-i rim,; to.Urkn.-- 



2.00 
2.00 

i n 

M.-.1- in Small 

I 00 

. ■ rjft-15 
Brown Pah 
L00 



Small 
7.00 10 

Small 






.1 

l 00 

1 

-.11 

3 

1 -i 

• 

3 
l 00 

... 

Small 



I 



I 



4 
4 






i L8TOR] i M 

33 



//<iri/.i ,irc ,i«,/ Metal 



THE MARKETS 



Wi . in •■.. follow - \o I hide-. 

II gkins, 8 to 
I". . and lambskins, 

Shi i about 21 

i decline in barb wire 
lb. 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January '->:L 190 

HARDWARE. 

. ' \i l the beginning of the year the 
^ with ii <■ hardware jobbers 

^-^ and manufacturers in Toronto lias 
satisfai tory, and from the way busi 
1 1« - — ha- opened out it looks as though 
I9u3 would i>f an even better year than 
I he onlj disturbing feature at the 
present time i- that the manufacturers 
an- looking for and expecting a change 
in the tariff. As a consequence, buying is 
unusually active in some lines that might 
be affected, and it is believed this bu 
will be missed later in the year. Another 
disturbing feature is the fact that maim 
facturers are withdrawing ([notations on 
some staple lines in which they may be 
a change, which ha- an unsettling etfecl 
Tiler.- i- no doubt, however, that Canada 
is in a prosperous condition, a- the de 
maud from British Columbia, the North 
west Territories and the Lower Provinces 
iter than it has been in the history 
of the hardware business for some time. 
'I'll.' i. nl\ changes of account are in wire, 
which have bean lowered to meet the 
competition of European lines. Fiices are 
otherwise steadj and featureless. 

BARB WIRE. There is a large tonnage 
booked for the spiing trade. Prices are 
In to I2jc lower. The base piiee is now 
a- follows : 82. •">."> from Cleveland, and 
Hie. less in carlots. From stock, To 
ronto. |2.80. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— Orders for spring 
deliveries are large. No-. 0, L2 and 13 
show a reduction of 15c. We quote as 
follows : Nos. Ii. T and S, $3.15 to $3.35 
per Inn ll». : No. ( .t, 12.50 : No. In. 
.s:*,.2n t,, 83.40 ; No. II. $3.25 to 
$3.45; No. 12, 82.65; No. 13, 8275 : No. 
II. §3.75 to $3.95 ; No. 15, 54.30; No. 
16, S4.55. Nos. <> to '.I ba-e from Cle\e 
land aie quoted at §2.274 '" ' rss than 
carlot-. 

SMOOTB STEEL WIRE.— Orders arc 
Coming in well for oiled and annealed. 
Trie.-. a re steady. We quote the base pi ice 
82.50 per 100 lb. Oiling, 
10c.; coppering, 60c. and tinning, §2 per 
100 lb extra. Shipping points, Toronto. 
Hamilton, London and .Montreal, with 
freights equalized on those points. 

WIRE \ ULS. Trade ha- been fairly 
booked, a- an advance i- anticipated. We 
quote : >'-' 15 pel I eg and 5c. less foi 
carlots. The shipping points are To 
ronto, Hamilton, London, Gauanoque and 
.Montreal. 

(II NAILS I here is nothing doing. 
W e quote 82 ■"> i i" i i 

EIORSE NAILS. -An ordinary sorting 
trade i, reported. Quotations on M 
brand have been withdrawn. Prici 
unchanged. Discounts are: '('" brand, 
0\ al lead. 10 and In aid 7 it.; on 

"Monarch," 65 per cent., and "Countei 
sunk'' head, 65 per cent.; "Peerless," 50 
and ~\ per cent. 

HORSl -inn - \ g I -oinn... de 

inand ivitll |)1 i PS atcady. We quote as 



follows: Iron shoes, No. - and larger, light 
medium and heavy, $3.45 ; snow shoes, 
§3.70 ; ILdit steel shoes, S3. 55 ; feather 
weiglil i all sizes i, s| 'la ; iron shoes, No. 

1 and smaller, light, medium and heavj 
tall si/esi, 53.70 ; snow shoes, SI ; light 
steel shoes, 53.80 ; Featherweight (all 
si/esi, 84.95. 

SCREWS. \ Bteadj trade dome. We 
quote: Flat head bright, s 7.\ and In 
per cent, discount; round head bright, 
s2$ and 10 per cent.; tint head brass, 8U 
and 10 per cent.; round head brass, 75 
and 10 per cent.; round head bronze, 65 
ici cent, and Hat head bronze. 70 per 
cent. 

i;i\ I' l s \\l) Bl liKS. A steadj de 

inand is noted, and our ((notations 
are as follows ; Iron rivets, 60 and 10 pel 
cent, discount . iron burrs, 55 per cent. 
copier rivets, with usual proportion of 
burrs. 15 per cent. ; copper burrs alone, 
30 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS. A brisk demand 
continues. There is no change in ptices.: 
Carriage bolts, common (§1 list), 50 per 
cent .; carriage bolts, full square (82. 4" 
list). 55 and 10 per cent.; carriage bolls. 
Norway iron (83.00 list). 55 and 10 per 
cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 50 and 10 
per cent.; coach screws, cone points, Gli 

2 3 and 10 per cent.; elevator shaft and 
whiffletree bolts. 50 per cent. 

SPADES AND SHOVELS.— It is early 

yet, but s< ■ orders arc being received. 

Prices arc unchanged, Discount is 15 per 
cent., and the list price has been reduced 
83 per do/, for Olds' goods, |2 for Gray's 
and 81 for Burns'. 

ROPE.- Orders are of a small nature. 
We quote: Pure manila, lie; British man- 
ila, 12c; sisal, lie.; lathyarn, single, 
lie. and double, llic; sisal bed cord, 3- 
cord, 48 feet, 65c; 60 feet. 80e.; 72 feet. 
05c. per doz. 

HARVEST TOOLS.— Orders continue to 
arrive freely. No change in the discounts 
is noted, they continuing at 60 and lo 
per cent. 

LAWN MOWERS. The same is true of 
this line. Our quotations are as follows : 
Woodyatt, 12-inch wheels. 87.50; Star, 
12-inch wheels. 85.50 ; Daisy. 12 inch 
wheel-. SI. 00; Philadelphia. 10-inch wheels, 
sti; Ontario. 10-inch wheels. 812.75. The 
other [nice- arc in proportion. 

CUTLERY.— The volume of business is 
small and prices arc steady. 

Bl ILDING PAPER. A particularly 
good demand for roofing felt for shanties 

is noted. We quote as follows : Dry 

sheathing, srrey or straw, 35c. per roll; 
tar sheathing, grey or straw, 45c. per 
roll ; dry fibre, 50c per roll ; tarred fibre, 
flOe. per roll. 

TINWARE AND ENAMELLED WARE 
—A good movement continues in milk can 
trimmings, but the general trade is mode 
rate. 

RANGE BOILERS. The. demand con 

tinues heavy. Prices are firm. W'e quote ; 
Is and .".'i gallon, 86; 35 gallon, 87; 40 gal 
Ion, 88; 52 gallon, 812.50; 63 gallon, fl9; 
illon, 823; 100 gallon, 831, and 120 
gallon, 837. 

ICAVETROUGH. No change in prices. 

and there i- a good trade doing. 

I'Ll MBERS' BRASS GOODS— The ac- 
tivity continues and prices keep firm. 

SCREEiN DOORS. Orders for later de 
livery continue generous. We quote as 
follows : Screen doors, common, 2 or 3 
panel, walnut -tame, I, I inch style, S6.60; 
stained, yellow or green) 87; in natural 

34 



colors, oil finish, 88.15; 3-inch style, 20c. 
per dozen less. 

CEMENT. There is not much doing as 
yet The prices are nominal. Our quota- 
Uons arc as follows: Canadian Portland, 
82 SO to 83.20; hydraulic, 8135 per bar 
rel. At the works the prices are 82.50 to 
82 J 1 per barrel. 

MET A US. 

The general market is more active and 
stock shipments have been more active 

during the | ast week. So good 

round order- have been filled to make up 
shortages in some lines. The spring out 
look, a- judged by the orders booked, i- 
verj promising 

PIG [RON I he markel is even stiffer 
than a week ago, owing to the reported 

reduction of the output of ( 'anadian iron, 
due to the scarcity of coke. Some English 
iron has been quoted here at figures 
varying from 821.00 to 823.50 per 
ton, though some No. 1 English is being 
sold at 824, when it can be had. Prices 
are as follows : 823 to 825 for No. I and 
822 ail for No. 2 at the Canadian fur- 
naces. No. 2 Summerlce is quoted at 825 
on track. Toronto. 

STEEL BOILER PLATES. We quote 
82 per 100 tb. at Pittsburg. 

TOOL STEEL.— The demand keeps very 

brisk. Prices are steady, aS follows: 
" B C " and "Black Diamond," 10 to 
lie; Jessop's, 'Morton's and Firth's, 
14c; Jonas & Culver's, 10 to 20c; ditto. 
''Air Hardening," 70c per tb. ; Chas. 
Leonard's, 8c to 9c; Park's "Silver," 12 
to 14c. ; Park's Special," 15 to 20c. 

MILD STEEL. Prices continue steady. 
We quote spoil per 100 lb. at Pittsburg 
and |2.75 per 100 lb. on track, Toronto. 

SPRING STEEL— The demand is nor- 
mal, but the mills are still behind their 
orders. W'e quote §3.50 per 100 tb. on 
track, Toronto. 

BAR IRON. — Prices are firm as the mar 
ket keeps active. We quote the base 
price : $2.05. Extras cut to length while 
rolling : 2 ft. and over, 10c per 100 lb.. 
I ft. and under 2 ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 
20c.; over 20 ft. by special agreement. 
according to length and si/e. 

BLACK SHEETS. The demand is im- 
proving. Prices are unchanged. We quote 
as follows: Common, 83-15 for 28 gaug^e 
and dead Mat. 82.50 for 2li gauge. 

CANADA PLATES.— The stock demand 
is small, but orders are being freely book 
ed for later delivery, Our quotations are. 
All dull. 82.50 to 83; half polished, S2.S5 
to 83.10 and all-bright, §.'5.75 to 83.85. 

OAI.\ WI/KD SHEETS. There is a 
more active demand. Prices keep steadj 
We epiote as follows: Queen's Head, 84.50 
for 28 gauge; American, 84.40 for 21 
gauge; Bell brand. 84.30 for 28 gauge; 
Cordon Crown, 84.50 for 2s gauge. 

TIN. The demand keeps brisk. Owing 
to speculation on the London market the 
prices have been forced up there, and 
Canadian jobbers have followed suit. The 

pri.es are firm at $31 to S32 per 100 tb. 

TINPLATES. Business is more active, 
with prices stiff. Quotations are as fol- 
lows : Charcoals. -S 1 . 7"> to §5 and cokes, 
84.25 to 84.50 per box. 

COPPER.- The demand for ingot cop 
per is better. Sheet copper is in fair re- 
que i at firm prices. We quote: Ingot 
copper. 813 and sheet couper, 822 to 823 

per 100 lb. 

BRASS. Unchanged. The discount is 

15 per cent. 



Till. MARKETS 



//till/a til f lltllt Mftill 



II \\) \ i, ,11 trade i repoi t< I Pi 
are unchanged ul 83 50 per 108 lb, for p»a 
lead and 13 73 loi bar lead, 

IKti\ PIPE. Business keep bi i b with 
\\, quote pex 100 It. Blank 
pipe, | in . 13; 1 in . 82 30 to 13 W; | in . 
|a 65; in . $2 85; i in., in . 

s;, 20; U-in., J7.35; I A In . ■ in . 

|12 55; -"■ in . 120 to 121; :; in ■ W4 to 
125; 3 I if 32; I in ■" to 

BINC SPI I I I R There ia more a,ti\ 
it\ \\ . quote 5 to 6c. per H' 

ZINC SH-P I l S Business is brisk. We 
qtn .i. i he base i" ice ' lask l"( b, 86 to 
si; 25 and pari i isks, ?fi 25 i ■ ?6 50 

SOI DE R I here is no change. Pi 
are ntead> at 20c Foi guaranteed half 
and half, and at IT t<> IS|c for wiping. 

WTIMOM Business in in small lots 
I he price is stead) at 89 per ton. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL.. 

II I DES. I hei e ii a plent if ul supplj and 
the market continues weak, We quote a- 
follows \,,. I green, 7-Jc; No. 2 green, 
• ill-, per ll>. ; No. I green, steei 9 ; No. 
_' green, steers, 7c. per lb.; cured, per lt>., 
81 to 8?c. 

CALF SKINS. Business continues dull. 
We quote \ eal skins, No. I. 6 to l I ft 
inclusive. I(k\; No. 2, s > ; No I. 15 to 
20 Hi inclusi\ e, i)c. ; Mo. '-'. 7'- De 
i daii ies I, each, 60 to To, 

SHEEPSKINS ["here is still a g I 

demand for these, and the price for bet 
grades has advanced 5c. We quote v|1 
to '.'"• 

WOOL. Fleece wool is prettj well mm 
keted. There is a fair demand for pulled 
wools and vniious grades of foreign 
wools. He quote: Unwashed wool, pei 

II' 8 to 8 ;.' : He wool, 15c; pulled 

wools, super., per ft., 15 bo 16c; ditto, 
extra, 19 to 20c, 

I \ I I,m\\ | he market continues un 
changed. We quote Tallow, per tb. (on 
track, Toronto), 5| to 6c.j ditto out of 
store), ii] to 

SEEDS. 

III.- market For seeds remains quiet We 
quote as follows Alsike, prepaid aboard 
at outside points, per bushel, $6 to $7.25; 
red clover, prepaid aboard at outside 
points, per bushel, 86.50 to $7 ; timothy, 
prepaid aboatd at outside points, per 
liu -In i. - i, , . •_'. 

PETROLEUM. 

\a ad\ b is noted by the I oion 

Petroleum ( o., pikes being a- follows ; 
l.d\ W hite, i anadiau, In . in bbls.; Sil 
vi'i Light, American, I9^c. in bbls.; Crys 
tal Spray, water white, American, 21c, 
in bbls.; Pennoline, best American im 
ported, 22c. in bbls. !n bulk, 2c. less. "Ihe 

, City Oil Company quote as foi 
lows Sarnia Prime White, 18c.; Sarnia 

i White, 20c.; Familj Safety, 204c. 
in obi*.; Pratt's \-tial. 20c. in Imlk. 

OLD MATERIAL.. 

The receipts are not yet a- liberal as 
desired, and piices are firm. We quote as 
follows ' Heavj eopper and wire, I"' 1 , per 
11, . Ii^ht coppei . s to si,, . ,,, av v ,, 

, '.i.U.; heavy yellow brass, 8 t, 
light brass, "> to 5-4c; lead, 2 to -.}<■ 
snap /inc. 3c.; iron. No. I wrought, S I -t 
net ton; No. "J wrought, 84.50; ma- 
chinerj cast scrap. 815.50 to |16; 
plate, $10; malleable and steel. 86 to 
|6 50; old rubbers, t>. L <\ per It', and conn 
try mixed rags, 50c. per MM) tb. 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifa' ranu ■•• 10 1903 

/ > |\( K the "p- i,ni. "i thi ■■■■■•< tl" 
^ « holesale i"> hardware has 

v ' i n oxtremel} dull, onh a 

limited numbi I mall oral 

filled Stock takinu and n 

been the ordei ol the daj bj the ml I 

w hile the heads ol i • been 

tudvins conditions and laying then 
plans for the months winch are t" follow 
and busy months, thej have all 

.,, to think, thej will Me. 
Travellers arc now out on theii roti 
and good spiiii- ordeis ate expected to 
,,, \,, doubt, tins will lie the 

a the conditions throughout the conn 

lis are bright and encouraging. S<> fai 
the travellers repoi I that tl ej have been 
well, but it is rather soon aftei tin- 
holidaj season to expe t heal j bu i 
as the countrj jobbei and retailer Beldom 

, ii, c to take stock and stud} I ondi 

tioiis until the new year o] ens, and in 
mam cases the work is nat yet complet 
ed. 

The Halifax Shovel Com| an) . w hioh 
does a good business here, in conjun 
witli oilier shovel manufacturers in Can 

:i , la. have mad,- Considerable reduction 

iii their products, ranging n om 81 to 

S-J,.")ll per do/en. tine dollar reduction 
has been made in spades. The reduction 

on \arious grades an 1 stapl.-s differs 
considei abh , the greatest being on Ion- 
handle I) No.6, which is $2.50. 

Linseed oil is repoi ted at an ad\ ance in 
the English market, but no change has 
been made local!) Turj antine is firm at 
late advances, and there i. a probability 
of a further advance. Paints and oil* 
arc firm, and these aie also expected to 
ad\ ance. 

To meet foreign competition there ha* 
been a reduction of 10c. in barb-wire fenc 
inc. which is now quoted a.t $2.90 base, 
and .">\ to I Ac. For staples. There is a 
considerable demand for wire and nails, 
which were subject to a decline lately, 
and are now quoted at $2.45 base: In no 
former season for many years has there 

Meen ~o great a demand for black b1 i 

iron. On a' count of the scarcity of haul 
•oal, which is still quoted here at 88 to 
59, many people had to lit up stoves foi 
heating, instead of furnaces. For the 
same reason there has been a heavy trade 
in stoves. 

Much interest U being taken in Am 
herst's new. or rather an enlarged manu 
facturing concern, under the naive of The 
Maritime Heating Company, refi 

which was made in a recent isst 

• Hardware and Metal." The promoteis 
are Knight .v Black, of The Vn 
Foundn < '•• . and H W. Robb, of Hie 
Robb Engineering Co. They have 
quired the rijrhl to manufacture the Robb 
hot watci Model With increased ca ital. 
the new company will largeh extend the 
operations of The Vmherst Foundry <'". 
The rolling mills at Dartmouth, though 
not an extensive establishment, as iron 
working establishments go, lias done a 
heavy business during the pi-i summer 
and autumn, \ great amount of work 
■ aine in to tin in through the wreck of 
the as Grecian, three miles out of the bar 
Mor. The steamer was ~<>M for ol I junk 
and broken up. The plates and all avail 
able ironwork was put through tin fur 
mice- and re rolled into merchantable 
material It i- -nul that this kind of re 
worked iron is verj durable and much in 
demand, R- ( B 

35 



n a i/ c vo ' 

I It K r I ii 

UnltL I \J 6d. a 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS. LIMITED 



limn 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Qlaai and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig; Street 

MONTREAL, 







( COVERT MFG. CO. 1 


r- Wtit Troy, N.Y 




Steel Carriage and 




Wagon Jacka.l 




JWy Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
?/ Goods, etc. 




/Ly FOR SALE BY JOBBERS ATMPRS. PRICES. 1 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 




-Aryrit VftnrtT, 
Toilet, Hand, fcleetri* Povu 

ARE THE BEST. 

Higheat Quality Grooming and 
8h«ep- Shearing Marhlnaa 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BEHT> F"I i aAii-.ii TO 
lM«ri«aa Sh«ar«r ■ r> €♦., ^u.oi, R.H..C&A 




NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

I ', i in bin e all the qualities deslrablt in a Door I loMI 
They work silently and effectually, and di 
out of order. In dm in many of the public build 
trigs throughout Ureal Britain and the Colonies 
MADE SOI.KI.Y 11 Y 

W. NEWMAN ft SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS. COW TIES. SNAPS, ate, etc., 

In all sizes and styles. May he bad of all 
Jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— H1AGAEA FALLS, ONT 



• • A • . 

STANDARD. 

The cost of Axes 
per million feet of 
lumber taken out 
should be the best 
Standard. Under 
this Standard the 
Crown Jewel is 
the cheapest Axe 
in the market. 

Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W.L. Haldimand, Jr., Batten Agent, Montreal 




ttarJmmn ami Metal 



THE MARKETS 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 
Winnipeu, Januarj 19, 1903. 
''INHERE is practicall\ no news of any 
1 kind in the hardware business this 
week. Trade is steadv. Jobbing 
houses are making preparations fora heavj 
spring trade, and a good many are already 
getting out shipments, and When tliis is 
^.iiJ .ill is said. There has been no change 
of price in anj line to record for the week. 
We quote as follows : 

Barbed .vire, ioo lb 

Plain iwisi 

Staples 

Oiled anneah'd wire 10 

II 

is 

13 



Annealed wires (unoiled) ioc. less. 

Cut Nails — Wire Nails — 

2d i in I(i° l in 

3d Kin. 1 !s in. . \ 10 

3d 1 Y K in 3 75 1% 

y\ i'A in 3 50 iM 

5d iK in 3 50 iK 

6d 2 in 3 40 2 

8d 2'A in 3 25 2% 

iod 3 in 3 20 3 

2od 4 in 3 15 3H 

3od 4% in 3 10 4 

40d s in 3 10 4^ 

5od ^% in 3 10 5 

6od 6 in 3 10 s x A 

6 



«3 25 
3 »S 
3 65 
3 4^ 
3 48 
3 56 
3 66 
3 7° 
3 91 



$4 20 



i*/b in 4 20 

3 8S 

3&° 

3 60 

3 5° 

3 35 

3 3° 

3 25 

3 2 ° 

3 20 

3 20 

3 20 

32° 



Horsenails,40 per cent. discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 3° 

No. 2 and larger 4 IS 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 55 

No. 2 and larger 440 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 440 

No. 2 and larger 415 

Bar iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, $4.75 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 2 85 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 50 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, ioolb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

18 to 22 gauge 3 75 

24 guage 3 90 

25 guage 4 00 

28gauge 4 10 

Galvanized Iron. American, 16 gauge. .. 4 00 

18 and 20 gauge 4 00 

22 and 24 gauge, 4 50 

26 gauge 4 50 

28gauge 4 75 

30 gauge 5 00 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 

of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

Apollo. 10K oz 5 00 

28 guage 4 75 

26 4 50 

24 4 5° 

22 gauge 4 50 

20 and 18 guage 4 25 

16 gauge 4 00 

Queens Head, 24 gauge 4 75 

26 guage 5 00 

28 " 5 25 

Genuine Russian, per lb n 

Imitation " 07 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 8 00 

26 gauge 8 25 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box .... 10 00 

IX 12 00 

IXX 14 00 

Ingot tin 33 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 00 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 500 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis Jn 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 14 75 

Solder 20 

Axes, chopping $ 7 5° to I2 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 % 

Round" " 82X 



Flat " brass 80 

Round " " 75 

Coach 6; p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 and 5 p.c. 

Tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p c. 

Flat head stove 60 and 5 p.c. 

Round head 60 and 5 p.c, 

itor 60 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

No. 12 36 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch 10 J4 

y t inch 8K 

5-16 inch sH 

X inch 5K 

7-16 inch 5 

•A toX inch 4K 

Spades and shovels 40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion.C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5pc. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 



Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black, 
chilled, 12 gauge. . . . 

soft, 10 gauge 

chilled, 10 gauge 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 

Chilled 

Powder, F.F., keg 

F.F.G 



16 50 
18 00 
21 00 
23 00 
6 00 
6 50 

4 7S 

5 °° 
Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

plain 75 and 2^ p.c. 

pieced 

Japanned ware 37 % p.c. 

Enamelled ware, while 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 and 10 p.c. 

Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American z^Ac 

Prime white American 23^0. 

Water white Canadian 23c. 

Prime white Canadian 21 'Ac. 

SCRAP. 

No. 1 cast iron $14 to $15 per ton. 

No. 2 " 5 to 6 " 

Wrought iron scrap 5- " 

Copper (heavy) 7c. per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7'Ac. 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. " 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c. to 2'Ac. " 

Zinc scrap ic. " 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels 

Less than barrel lots 

Linseed oil, raw 

Boiled 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 

Eldorado engine 

A tlantic red 

Renown engine 

Black oil ig'A 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 

Harness oil 

Neatsfoot oil ' 

Steam refined oil 

Sperm oil ... .' 

Pure castor oil, first pressure 

Lubricating 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 
united inches 

26 to 40 per 50 ft . 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 

51 tooo 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 

kegs " 

White lead, pure per cwt. 

No. 1 " 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal . $1 .30 

86 



$ 83 

88 
71 
74 
27 % 
26% 
29 M 
41 
to 2l'A 

55 t° 74 
56 

1 00 

85 

2 00 



2 50 

5 S° 

6 00 

6 5° 

2tf 

2K 

6 00 

5 75 

to ji.90 



FOREST CITY GOSSIP. 

Office of " Hardware and Metal." 
London, (int., January 22, l'JO.'i. 

THERE are rnanj people in different 
ountries of the world who still 

imagine that tins Canada of ours 
is u land »f ice and snow, stumps an I 
bears, endless forests, and Indians in- 
numerable, living in huts in the most 
primitive style. A visit to this wide- 
awake city would soon dispel this allus- 
ion, and eyes would apen with unspeak- 
able wonder and pleasure at the clean, 
bustling and up to date young city, which 
wa- considered an impossibility. 

' .either is this young London at a 
standstill; its growth has been rapid, and 
development is everywhere in evidence ; 
the lovely avenues, public squares, hand- 
some churches and public buildings, as 
well as the magnificent and solid struc- 
tures of the wholesale merchants, testify 
that this is a young giant, healthful. 
vigorous, and level-headed. 

Anions the branches of business here 
that have brought commercial repute to 

this city is that of hardware. There are 
some six or seven houses engaged ex- 
exclusively in Hie wholesale, shelf and 
heavy hardware trade, all of whom are a 
Credit to Canada ; any one of whom 
could unblushingly hold up their end in 
any country in the world. Jack Tar's 



ASSISTANT WANTED. 

Bright young man with thorough knowledge 
of the hardware trade, and full of bright up-to-date 
ideas to ass st in the editorial department of Hard- 
ware and Metal. State experience and present 
salary. Address Editor Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto or Montreal. 



THE "SUN" BRAND P01TUID CEMENT. 

We make only one quality and that the beat 
Ask us for Quotations. 

The Sun Portland Cement Co., Limited 

OWEN SOUND 
.Ias. A. ('line, Managing Director 



at lower prices than ever offered. Write us. 

KERRIGAN HARDWARE CO, 
LONDON, ONT. 



PAINTS 



We manufacture 

these brands: — 

"LION," '« PEERLESS," "OWL," 

"RAVEN," also Ready-mixed 

House and Floor 

Paims, Hoof, Barn, 

Bridge and Brick 

faints, Coach Colora, 

Varnishes, Japans. 

etc Our prices will 

iuterest you. Write 




The Ottawa Paint Works, Ottawa, Ont, 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



■ ;i llli-illl' to .HI all' lull .' 

or, a- i ommj \ iken puts it, " Fr< m i 

11 cap to a • .union." are w ml - 
.11 well be applied to t be » ari* I 
and well kept assortments of tl ampl> 

I'll' 'il w m ol 



I I,,- 1 1 and of ■" i' »mei i ij i b< Lor 

dun wholesale hardware ornu are to be 
found in 1 1 • « - ii t i.~ . towns and villa 
awaj to the north, t>> the louth, to the 
in I to the wast, and among the 
numerou! id hope and general 

stores of the country, as well as the oul 
lying placet of business, in out of-thc 
u.iv districts, where a good flourishing 
trade > 'lone with the surrounding 

,'llltlll IM~. 

There are some -il commercial travel 
.ill L ,,,,„i |i H ,|, ing . it, mi i and bard 
working, who are almost continually on 
the road in the interesl of the hardware 
Grots alluded t". The writer of this 
knows " whereof be speaks," and he on 
hesitatingly attests that no better bunch 
of men, as a whole, could be selected 
auy where, who could better represent the 
hardware trade, in particular, and the 
city of ' "il, Ion in general. 
« » • 

The lisl of manufacturing concerns in 
Ion is quite long, and thos< 
in makih odit ies out of brass, 

iron, steel, win-, etc., give employment 
t.i many hundreds of men, with agents 
and representatives, both in Canada and 
the United Stairs. In future letters, 
notice will I"' taken eithei collectively or 
Beparatelj <>i" these, as we know that tho 
hardware merchants of this country an- 



li in 

formation, 

• • • 

Retail I - bore, and o ei We 

( lutai io. ha I" ■ ii quiet ini ■ thi holi 

and prices of hardware remain an 

ed Hard coal is 119 pei ton ; 

I .»« ii prices ari ao1 li loked fi ir 

■ in,- time 

« • • 

a B M- Kenzie, of McKanzie A M- 
Leod, coal and wood merohanl . died 

laxl week, 

e # • 

The manager of our London office will 
give a > ii j hearty she 'l out ride 

merchants visiting the city, il they call 
an I sit him at i In- III ."\ Building, 305 
R 1 1 M hi I street. 

W. II I. 

RETAIL HARDWAREMEN TO MEET. 

On Tuesday, Februarj 24, a convention 
ill hardware merchants will be held 
in Hamilton to discuss matters of interesl 
to iho retail trade. The meeting will be 
under the auspices of the Retail Merchants' 
Association. On Thursday, February 19, 
a banquet will be held bj the hardw ir< 
section of Hie same organization in To- 
ronto. The following officers have the 
latter affair in hand : Chairman, E. K. 
Rogers; vice-chairman, \V. E. McFar- 
land ; 2nd vice-chairman, CI. Pearsall ; 
treasurer, S. J. Casloe ; secretary, F. J. 
Greei ; general secretary, E. M. Trowern. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mi l- red Stoi k, of Fei nie, B.< was in 
Toronto ihis week doing the who! 
houses and calling upon a numb* 
manufai turers whose lines he handli 

Mi \ II I tbell, "i \. i . Leslii .\ 

i Montreal, sailed lo-da) (Saturday) 

from \i w Vork bj ss. Lucania on a busi- 
ness ti ip to Ureal Britain and the i on- 
tinent. 

Mr. I I ugh M. L.iu ii, ji . hardware 
merchant, Perl Elgin, Ont., paid Hard- 
w \i;i wo Mi i m a \ ix'n .,i theii I oronto 
office "ti Saturday. Mr. McLaren s,i\s 
business was never better than lasl 
and ilii^^-.u promises t" be as good il not 
bettei ^^ 

CROWN LIFE. 

The Crown Life's calendai partakes 
more ol the nature of an advertisement 
than a calendar. The make-up of the 
whole sheet is, however, well worth] 
place on the wall. Around the edge 
appear the pictures of the din.-, tors of the 
company, thirtv-four in number, sir 
Charles Tupper heading the line as 
president. These pictures show up well 
againsl a ad hack ground. The centre 
o( the calendar contains ,i statement ol 
rates and a sample- policy. "Crown 
Life" is embossed in gold with white edges. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 

Sisal Rope 

Jute Rope 

Russian Rope 

Marline 

Housellne 

Hambrollne 

Clotheslines 

Tarred Hemp Rope 

White Hemp Rope 

Bolt Rope 

Hide Rope 

Halyards 

Deep Seallne 

Ratline 

Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster /Vlarlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED rHREAD' transmission Kope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 



.Limited 



Western Ontario Representative 
WM. B. STEWART. 



Tel. 94 



27 Front St., West, Toronto. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



teao 



must not be confounded with any other cold water wall 
tint, old-fashioned or new. 

Muralo is a dry powder, impalpably fine with the 
purest permanent tone colors; made to make walls beauti- 
ful, and the process of manufacture is known only to The 
Muralo Co. 

Muralo can be sold to the fanner, the artisan, or the 
man of ease, who can get a painter to put it on, or do it 
himself if he likes ; Muralo works easy. 

Muralo brings the dealer a handsome profit : that's 
what you are after, isn't it ? Write 

AGENTS : 

A. RAMSAY & SON. .... MONTREAL 
THE J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO., Limited. - WINNIPEG 
McLENNAN. McFEELY & CO.. • - • VANCOUVER 

Makers 

THE MURALO COMPANY, New Brighton, Borough of Richmond 



37 



H*n,l;t in i* ititit Metal 




PUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Ill G \UD\i:i; & BROS., plumbers, ol 
Montreal, have dissolved, and a 
new partnership has been regie 

I . ||. Gaudry, plumbers' supplies, Que 

-i.' . has assigned. 
'I'll.' Sanitary Plumbing Company, of 
Granby, Que., have registered ' ( ,\^k> 1),|v ' 

Fred Stock, of Fernie, B.C., left for 
his home after a second visil to Toronto 
this week. Mr. Stock has lately placed 
large orders for high class plumbing 
goods, Buch as are seldom seen in a town 
the size of Fernie. 

M, Wilcox, of Doig & Wilcox, Glen 
boro', Man.. \\a< in Toronto this week. 
Mr. Wilcox, who is a progressive dealer 
in plumbing, steamfittings and threshing 
engine supplies, reports business booming 
in lii- district just now. 

There is some talk of a curling match 
between two rinks representing the mastei 
plumbers of Toronto and an equal num 
ber of architects of that city. The ar- 
rangements have not as yet been fully 
completed, but a "roaring" time may be 
looked for when the game comes off. 

Toronto master plumbers include some 
staunch Scotchmen in their ranks. The 
regular monthly meeting at' their Asso- 
ciation falls on Monday evening next, but 
as the Caledonian concert is to lie held 
the same evening, the Scottish members 
broughl the weight of their combined in 
fluence to bear, so the meeting has been 
postponed till Tuesday evening. 

A □ I The Canadian Heating and 

Ventilating Company, Limited, was held 
on Tuesday in Owen Sound. Out., but at 
present no details are offered for publics 
tion. The institution has passed the 
of organization, however, and the 
building of the works is assured. Among 
the gentlemen identified with the new 
concern ar<- several prominent manufac- 
turers of iron and steel products, and the 
industry maj eventually become on 
great magnitude. 

A NOVEL INK-WELL. 

The Ideal Manufacturing Company, of 
Detroit, Mich., have made up one of the 
most unique ink well? yel pal on the mar- 
ket, being no less than a miniature 
''Ideal" low down. The bowl is while. 
the woodwork of oxidized bronze, in imi 
>ah g i ain. A pei petual calen 



dar is placed in the tank, but it may be 
taken out ami shot put in For holding 
pens or a sponge. The back and floor 
is nickel plated. Needless to saj these 
arc not for genera] distribution, but any 
of the trade can likeh gei one of them 
by mentioning " Hardware and Metal 
to \ I) McArthur & Co., Toronto, the 
Canadian agents for this firm. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 
TORONTO. 

• I. J. Fraser, pair of dwellings, aeai 
Bloor street, on Lansdowne avenue, to 
cost $5,000. 

II. F. Squires, pair of dwellings on 
Beatrice street, near College, to cost $5, 
500 : -I . \. Harvey, architect. 

C. II. Wilson, pair of dwellings on St. 
George street, near Duponl street, to cost 
$6,750 ; C. Parker, architect. 

HAMILTON. 

E. B. Patterson, architect, for III brick 
dwellings for The Barton Building Com- 
pany Limited, to be built on Fullerton 
avenue, at a cost of $36,000. E. A. De 

pew is the contractor. 

TORONTO JOINT COMMITTEE MEET 

A meeting of the Joint Committee, re- 
presenting the Master Plumbers' Assooia 
tion ami the Journeymen Plumbers' 
I nion met on Monday evening. 

The principal subject under discussion 
was the apprenticeship question, particu 
larly the length of time one would have 
to be employed before getting the tools. 
As an agreement was not reached, an 
other meeting has been set for Monday, 
February 2, when, in addition to the 
matter now in hand, the new plumbing 
by law will likely be taken up. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

Ptirdv . Mansel] & Company, Toronto, 
have the contract for hot water heating 
the II. C. Presbytery, Pcnetanguishene. 
Out. 

The John Ritchie Company, Toronto, 
have contracts foi heating '-'''2 drying 
kilns for Marlett & Armstrong. Oakville; 
also a plumbing job for the same firm ; 
also the plumbing lor 'I he I'ul'falo Tool 

and Machine Company, Front street, To- 
ronto. 

38 



ACETYLENE STANDS THE TEST. 

AN extended series of observations up- 
on the hygiene of acetylene light 

him has been recently carried out 
bv M. Masi. a prominent Italian scien- 
tist, who made a number of experiments 
at Kome, Bays Scientific American. The 
number of appliances for producing ace- 
tylene are considerable, but in many in- 
stances their imperfections and defective 
construction have rendered the use of 
acetylene less extensive than might be. 
seeing that it has many advantages and 
is a more healthful method of lighting. 
According t>> the experiments of Grehant. 
Wehl and Frank, the Lias has a harmful 
influence only upon the air when it 
reaches the proportion of Hi per cent., 
and it is only at 7'.l per cent, that it 
causes death. When absorbed by the 
blood in quantities not exceeding 10 per 
cent., it seems to combine easily with the 
albuminoid elements. The burner, to give 
a good light, should work under a pres- 
sure equal to 3 or I inches of water at 
least, and be mixed, before burning, with 
oxygen or an inert gas which permits it 
to' come in contact with a great quantity 
of air. Messers. Lewes and Hempel have 
shown that its lighting power is 15 to 20 
times that of illuminating gas used in an 
ordinary burner and from three to five 
limes when in a Welsbach burner. M 
Masi carried out some experiments in a 
chamber fitted up in the cellars of the 

Institute of Hygiene at Rome, unuer the 

most unfavorable conditions as to ven- 
tilation, so as to bring out as much as 
possible the effect on the respiratory 
organs. He observed also the intensity 
and steadiness of the flame, the quality 
of light produced, the heat and the chance 
brought, about in the surrounding air. 
Repeated experiments on these different 
point- showed that acetylene gave super- 
ior results. The gas, in burning, con- 
sumes less oxygen and gives off less 
carbonic acid gas and water vapor 
than is the case with other meth 
ode of lighting, excluding, of course, the 
electric light. In a confined locality it 
produces less heat than either gas, can- 
dles or petroleum, and it does not give 
rise to ammonia, nitrous acid or carbon 
monoxide. He considers that it does not 
present any more danger from explosion 
than gas or petroleum, and that it i< 
cheaper for a given candle power than all 
other methods of lighting. 



^T> 



NADIAN HARDWARE AND MKTAL 



THE 
RIGHT 
PAINT 

TO 
PAINT 
RIGHT. 



Ramsay's Paints have won their way to con 
fidence; being made on just the right principles 
to retain confidence 

Once a trade is established in Ramsay's 
Paints, it never changes excepl to increase. 

Ramsay's Paints are trade-producers lor 
many of the oldest and best stores in our 
Dominion. 

Ramsay's " ads." help. 




A RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



PAINT 
MAKERS 



4 






•J 
•j 



The Auer 
Gas Lamp. 

"TURNS NIGHT-TIME 
INTO DAY-TIME." 

New Styles. Lower Prices. 

Are you interested in a lamp 
which gives ioo candle 
power? 

Are you interested in light 

i;ig your store brilliantly? 

You know it draws trade? 

Are you interested in saving 
hal f of your bill for coal oil ? 

Are you interested in having 
the agency for a lamp 
which does this? 




No. 28 
100 Candle Power. 



Then write for our Catalogue and Discounts. 



•: 



EVERY LAMP GUARANTEED. 



AUER LIGHT CO., 1682 NOTRE DAME ST., MONTRLAL. 



Eh* 



♦^■^v*'V>vV^''»»w*w i 



FOR 



Headquarters 
FREEZERS 



> 



== 



WE KEEP 




Blizzard and Crown 



THEY HAVE -*■ 

Automatic Twin Scrapers. ^ 
Cedar Pail*. with E E£!f" WeMed 

7 Hoops. 

Heavy Tin-Plate Cans, with 

Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
RESULTS 

aUICK FREEZING, with No Waste of Ice. 
HOOPS will not drop off as others do. 
THE HEAVY CANS will last a lifetime. 




CAVERHILL, LEARMONT 
CO., 

s-t. r=>&±&r s-t., 

MONTREAL. 



♦ 



39 



//<ir</.v.ir«- anil At, tul 



HEATING AM) PLUMBING 



BUILDING NOTES 



^ I 'HE ■ 1 1\ eng ncer of Lo 
has been instructed ti 



London, Out., 
to furnish es 
Umates of :< I ill'' lieu >il\ 

h;\H for thai 



Kormal School will prob- 

M Laren proposes to erect a three 
, hotel in Stratford, Oni 

Work on thr new stock exchange build 
■ • Montreal will begin about Way I. 

rh.- Canadian Hank of Commerce will 
erect new premises for their Dundas, Out., 
branch. 

Contractor 1>. I*. Whitehead has alreadj 
contracted to erect l"> residences beyond 
Louise Bridge, Winnipeg, during the com- 
ing season. 

The three English hospitals in Mont 
real have accepted the city's offer, and 
aif now looking for a site for the eeee- 
lion in the western portion of the city of 
a hospital for contagious diseases. 



Imperial Hank has purchased a 
building site on Victoria Square, at St. 
John, N.B., ami will erect a modern 
bankii g and office building 

The Bank of Montreal arc about to 

-p. 'iid 1350, ' in alterations and an ad- 
dition to their lead olliee in Montreal, 
and when completed, it is expected it will 
l>e the finest bank building on this con- 
tinent, if not in the whole world. 

The \o\a Scotia steel and Coal Com 
pany have decided t<> commence at the 
opening of the spring the erection of 50 
miners' cottages at the Hilt Pond slope. 
The company will endeavor to have the 
work done by local contractors if possi 
ble. 

The plans for the new C.P.R. station 
for Winnipeg are about completed. The 
details were suggested by a well-known 
New York architect, who designed the 
Place \ icier, the Vancouver, and other 
handsome structures on the line. The de- 
sign is said to he somewhat similar to 



that of the Place Vigier, but much more 
extensi\ c 



OTTAWA BUILDERS WERE ACTIVE 

Tin' annual statement relative to build- 
ing construction in Ottawa during the 
\ear recently close.) has In en prepared by 
Building Inspector Pratt. During the 12 

months 172 permits were issued, and the 
value of the structures was 8641,915. Tn 
the previous year only 397 permits were 
issued, but more expensive buildings were 
|iut up. the aggregate cost exceeding $1,- 

000, I. The building done in 1902 was 

apportioned as follows: Solid brick, 
5-298,345 j brick-veneered, 8255,300 ; stone, 
845,500 ; wood, §42,700. 

There were 131 local improvements, side 
walks, etc.. made during the year, at a 
total est of 8136,013, while in 1901 the 
amount of such works was $114,839.21. 
In that year 173 local improvements were 
constructed. 




CYCLONE LAWN IWO CEMETERY FENCE. 

We builit it from 21 inch to il inch high. I'roi.i 14c. to 
I9c. per running foot. The best and strongest in t he 
market. We build farm fences and gates of all sizes. 

Cyclone Woven Wire Fence Co., Limited 

Write for price. ^^"^^TORONTO 




IDEAL::: Fencing 



Woven 
Wire 

< OMPLETE IN THE KOLL. READY TO ERECT. 

A GOOD SELLER 

because the use of No. g Hard Spring Wire for 
both Slays and Horizontals makes it the 

Strongest and Best. 

WRITE FOB SAMPLE AND PRICES. 
THE 

McGiep-rjanwell fence Co., 



WINDSOR, ONT 



Limited. 




!%?& 



"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN ? 

for Folder No. 1 1. 

Pullman Sash Bal. Co. 
Rochester. N.Y. 



FENCES 

and GATES 

IN WIRE AND IRON. 

We can furnish anything required, from a plain 
wire fence for the farm to an ornate iron fence for 
residence or public building. Special prices to 
hardware trade. Send for catalogues. 

The Dennis Wire and Iron Co,, 

LONDON. ONT. 



1,000 PRINTED ENVELOPES 

For $1.00 

We do good printing cheap— 5d0 
Noleheads, 500 Envelopes and 60(1 
Statements for |2.50. 

Snaps in Stationery of all kinds. 

WEESE 4 CO., Jobbers, 

54 Vonge Street, - Toronto. 




FOH SALE. 



FOR SALE— OLD ESTABLISHED HARD- 
ware Business in rapidly growing town ot 
Collingwood. It has good connection and increas- 
ing trade ; owner retiring. Apply to J. Henderson, 
Collingwood. (5) 



DO YOU WANT A SET OF TINNER'S OR 
Plumber's tools at a bargain? If so write 
Byers, Giegerich, Green Co., Limited, Kaslo, B.C. 



HARDWARE— GOOD PAYING BUSINESS, 
excellent location, sales mostly cash, stock 
S4 000, all first-class. Owner going into manu- 
facturing. Will sell quick at price on dollar. 
Address care London Fence Machine Co. , London, 
Canada. (tf) 



A 1 OPENING. BEST AND MOST SUCCESS- 
ful hardware business in first-class Weste n 
Ontario town, 2,500 population. Agricultural dis- 
trict equal to any in Canada. Good live stock, 
value over $4,000. Proprietor going into manu- 
facturing. Splendid opportunity, must sell quick. 
Address "Hardware," care London Fence Ma hine 
Company, London, Ontario. (tf) 



SITUATION VACANT. 

WANTED — TRAVELLER FOR HARD- 
ware line by a manufacturing company, 
for Montreal city, speaking English and French ; 
state experience. Must have best references Good 
opportunity for live man — none other need apply. 
Apply, Box 14, " Hardware," Toronto. (4) 



»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ + ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»++..»++ 



iSTEVENS-MAYIMARD J R - RIFLE ] 



i- 



The 

Young Gentleman's 

Rifle. 




The 

Young Gentleman's 

Rifle. 



you want the best cheap rifle ever made we have it in the Stevens-Maynard Jr. 
will be a great seller this year. Better place order now. 



-i 



The 1-ading Jobbe-s handle Stevens products. 



t J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2l B 7 ox Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. ; 

♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ »»»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦■»♦♦+•♦♦•»! 

in 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO. 



Wholesale Hard- 
Limited, ware Merchants. 



Ottawa, Ont. 



Barb Wire, 
Hay Wire, 
Cut Nails, 
Wire Nails, 
Cordage, 
Glass, 
Etc. 



The Only 
Exclusive 
Wholesale 
Hardware Firm 
Between 
Montreal 

and 
Toronto. 



Tarred and 

Dry Sheathing, 
Tarred Felt, 
Rosin, Pitch, 
Chopping Axes, 
Broad Axes, 
Cross Cut Saws, 

Etc. 



A complete stock of Lumbermen's and Builders' Hardware always on hand. A Trial Solicited. 
PRICES RIGKEIT. ASK FOE FRIGES. 



Use Syracus 



abbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 

Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc., always in stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Gold Street, New York. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



ATKINS 

HIGH-GRADE, SILVER STEEL SAWS 

Are the FINEST that Money. 



Experience and Skill can Produce. 

No dealer's stock is complete without them. 
They are easy to sell. Every saw warranted. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices. 

H. P. HUBBARD, Sales Agent for Canada. 

Toronto Office; 44 Scott St. Tel. Main 1896. 




' 



^> 



C. ATKINS & CO. 

Factories and Home Office: INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York : 
Empire Building. 



Montreal : 
New York Life Building. 



Chicago : 
The Rookery. 



Barb Wire. Galvanized Plain Wire 

Plain Twist Cable Fencing. 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire, Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of every description, Rail Bonds, Bale 
Ties, Special Wires for all purposes. Springs, Morse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold Drawn Steel Shafting. 

-11 



fftir tin-art' iiHti Metal 



: 

! 



m*»+4*i^>»0*t*+mi 



ADVERTISING AND SHOP MANAGEMENT. 



By H. C. W. 



r ■ >HE conduct of a business is in itself 
largely responsible for the success 
or non-success of its advertising. 
I Ik writer has tried to show how much 
of good and how much of profit may 
emanate from the office as a source of 
constant advertising, and is a firm be- 
liever in the fact that every man on the 
floor may do his share. Fie will not do 
it if his every effort is toward getting 
through with the customer, throwing the 
goods on the shelves, growling at an ex- 
tra bit of labor and breaking for the out- 
side at the meal or closing hour, regard- 
less of the little undone things that if 
done make him valuable and are more 
than noticeable. 

PLEASE I' I IK PUBLIC 
and they'll talk to you to the extent 
that it is your very best advertisement. 
Keep giving them something new to talk 
of in the arrangement of your store, in 
takiny up new lines, in handling what 
other stores do not handle, in getting 
what they want when you do not have 
it, in your better knowledge of their wants 
than the other man, in the good address 
of your clerks, as compared with others, 
in the arrangement of your stock, your 
showcases and your wall eases, in the 
clever arrangement of your 

SHOW WINDOWS, 

and these latter ate not the least, by any 
manner of means. As an advertisement. 
They are not equalled, and as a silent 
salesman, when rightly treated, every man 
with experience knows their worth. Over- 
crowding spoils them as nothing else pos- 
sibly can. A few good things at a time 
are enough and often better only one, 
and that one or with all of them always 
the price. Price on anything, price on 
everything, and half the work of selling 
is done ; sometimes all of it, for many 
goods are brought from your doorway, 
laid on your counter, the price with them, 
and all that is asked is the wrapping up. 

BUY BARGAIN?. 

and let it be known you buy them ; then 
give them jusl as freely. They need not 
necessarily be shoddy because cheaper 
than your neighbor's- < j <>ocl, sound judg- 
ment , will lead a man right in what he 
buys as in anything else. Bargain coun- 
ters need not in any way partake of the 
5 and 10 cent stores or the department 
store. They may be made up in part of 
stock not saleable at a full or a present 
value, and the fact that you are known 
to have them ia certainly a long card and 



»vi^a»« 



a strong card in advertising that costs 
you less than anj other class. 

TAKE A TRAP. 

Get out occasionally to other towns 
and other stores : see how other mer- 
chants do business. No one of us has it 
just right, and 1 doubt not each one of 
us can learn enough to justify the time 
and expense of going. Then the knowl- 
edge that you go and that you improve 
each time is in itself a clever advertise- 
ment with a much larger class of people 
than is dreamed of. People like to pat- 
ronize merchants who are up-to-date and 
willing to learn. 

HAVE VOIR CLERKS POSTED. 

Have them know all about the goods 
they seek to dispose of ; who makes 





JOHN LOUGHRIN 

Main Street, Mattawa. 




Shelf and Heavy Hardware 






Cooking and CTntllTC 
Heating ... OIUlLJ 

Builders' Hardware. 
Edged Tools a Specialty. 

Camping Outfits, Guns, Rifles, Am- 
munition, Fishing Tackle and Sport 
ing Goods of all kinds. Household 
Furniture, Paints (mixed and dry) 
Oils, Varnishes, Kalsomines anc 
Brushes of all descriptions, alsomanu 
facturers of Tinware of all kinds. Meta 
Roofing particularly attended to. 





A SAMPLE AI>. 

them, where made, how made and of what 
material. Nothing so attracts a prospec- 
tive buyer as to find a salesman who is 
able to talk to him in this way. No one 
thing will drive him out so quickly as 
to drop on to the fact that he is a paid 
ignoramus on the subject. In a tool de- 
partment it costs but little time to know 
the mechanism of a ratchet drill, a chuck 
or a wrench, or in the sporting - goods 
corner to know — and be able to tell it — 
the inner parts and construction of one 
make of gun as compared with another 
make ; and every customer leaving your 
store is bound to speak of the cleverness 
of this man. 

RETURN THK MONEY 

and without argument, when goods are 
brought back as unsatisfactory. It is 
a little bit hard to do it with a smiling 



face, to see it go back after having once 
owned it, and yet that one thing has 
founded the fortune of some of the best 
merchants this country knows to-day. We 
may occasionally be imposed on, but even 
the imposter will talk of it. If it is not 
done pleasantly the man is ever after 
your enemy ; so is the woman. And the 
damage done in their repetition of the deal 
cannot be estimated. On the other hand, 
the pleasant return and the " come 
again " is just as liable to bring dozens 
as the one interested, and your advertise 
ment is made. 

VOIR CUSTOMERS 

are your best advertisers always. It is 
sometimes pretty hard to get this fact 
through the heads of employes, but it is 
as true as that the sun rises. 

Treatment of children. — Have you noted 
how much a stir is created at the per- 
haps unintentional injuring- of a child's 
feelings, or the rude neglect because it 
happens to be a child ? Do you know the 
woman doesn't live who ever forgets or 
forgives an injury at the hands of em- 
ployer or employe ? Years after you will 
hear of it through the medium of some 
near neighbor to whom she has gone with 
her woe. 

Courtesy. — It is an awfully safe rule and 
a splendid advertisement to never for a 
moment allow argument or dictation with 
a customer, to ever and always treat the 
child with courtesy and kindness and in- 
sist on having it done, and, in fact, to 
yourself set the example of being a gen- 
tleman always 

YOUR COMPETITOR 

should be your friend. If he will not then 
perhaps you cannot, but it's wise to do 
our best to that end. Enmity at least 
need not be created as far as you are 
concerned. There is no question but that 
both can do more business, can make 
more money, when on good terms than 
the reverse. There is no question but 
that a friendly state of affairs permits ex- 
change of favors that never come in its 
absence. But if it must be and he must 
talk of his neighbor, it's a pretty good 
advertisement for the other man that he 
keeps quiet. He rather has the best of 
it, and as most people will learn the 
truth, he is also getting a good deal of 
free advertising. A man who can keep on 
good terms with his neighbors and com- 
petitors is a pretty safe man to buy 
goods of. — Iron Age. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




HARNESS PREPARATIONS. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 

- HARNESS DRESSING 

Recognised us 

•• THE STANDARD.'' 
Produce! a brilliant Jet 
black gloss which will not 
peel or smut mul to which 
dirt will not stick. 



M* 



FRANK MILLERS 

HARNESS ERI^fflO 






[HE FRAKl MILUJ OO 




Frank Miller's 

Harness Soap 

Unrivaled for 
cleanliiK »nd BOft- 

snlng Barnea* 

I'ut up in cakes, 
pans, boxes niul 
lulis. 



FRANK 
MILLER'S 



Harness Oil. 



Preserves and softens the leather, grgp 
thus adding life. 

The highest quality of oil on the 
market. 



IHARNES5] 
OIL 



TsPBANK MILLED Ct 



HORSE BLANKETS 
HORSE COVERS 



.lutes ami hutch 

Kenej a 

lilack ami Brown 
'Waterproofs 

SWEAT PADS-tSST 1 ™*" ' 

Enquiries Solicited. 
HENRY F. FALKINER 
60 George Street - TORONTO 



LAMB FENCE 



ilinmtliin of 

springs throi 
i -ni in- length 

The H. R. LAMB FENCE CO. , Limited, London, Ont. 




Steward & Romaine Mfg. Co. 

EXPANSION and 
TOGGLE BOLTS 

Dg .ill kinds "i material to '■ 

• • uienl. 

124 North Sixth St.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

GALVANIZING 

our plant is modern, and 

MOM O.K. I >t in-r I. nun I ■ 

WINDMILLS, PUMPS, TANKS, 
FOUNDRY WORK ETC., ETC. 

Ontario Wind Engine A Pump Co., Limited, 

BOS Atlantic in., Toronto 



STOVE BRICK 



Fire Clay 
and Asbestos. 
Furnace Cement. 



ah kimis <>f Mre ( lay prodooti made u 



.r<iir from pattern Write fbr Prk 



,M. 



JONES BROS., ■"•■SSM^fc, 01 " 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20 Gunge. 
Bteel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



8lmpl«st 
Take Down ' 
Cun Made. 




GET THE ORIGINAL. 

We lead, others imitate. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., 



Manufacturers. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 




THE CELEBRATED 

NATIONAL CLTLERV CO. SHEARS 

Acknowledged the best and fully warranted. 
Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



TailofryShears 
himmAs 
lames' Scissors 
Barbers' Shears 
Tinners' Snips 



DECATUR, BULL & CO., 




Sales Agents, 
MONTREAL 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St.. MO N TREAL. 
73 YEARS. ESTABLISHED IMS. 73 YEARS. 

13 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



NEWFOUNDLAND PROSPEROUS. 

t« » \\ \\r of prosperity is sweeping 
\ over the Island oi Newfound 
land,' saul Mr. F. J. Hunter, 
manager of the Bank oi Montreal, at St. 
John's, Mkl.. u> a Halifax Chronicle re 
potter on Saturday. 

• The business of the Island is in a 
healthy condition," lie said. " but 
ili> price of codfish, the chief staple pro 
dud of the country, is lower than it has 
for many years previous, which, of 
bas the effect of curtailing circu 
lation to a very large extent. Prices, 
al ... of this staple in the foreign mar- 
kets have been extremelj depressed, neces- 
sitating the holding of fish by the lead 
ine exporters for higher price-, both in 
the markets of the Brazils and the Medi- 
teri ant'an. 

THE HERRING FISHERY. 

•• The herring fishery on the West Coast 

has been a good one, and it is estimated 

thai American buyers have left $200,000 

Id with the people along the Coast 

for these fish. 

•• The lobster fishery is up to the 
standard, and the priees are exception 
ally good. Cod and seal oils have aver- 
aged good prices, as well as seal skins." 

Mr. Hunter said the feature of the lat- 
ter was the export to the United States 
of these skins, instead of only to Eng- 
land, as formerly. Good prices are ob- 
tained for these skins, which are used for 
patent leather, bicycle saddles, etc. 

Speaking of the local manufacturing 
business. Mi. Hunter said they are all do 
ing exceptionally well, and paying hand- 
some dividends. He referred particularly 
to the manufacturing of boots and shoes, 
and to the Cordage Company. 

THE HAY-BOND TREATY. 

Asked as to the feeling regarding the 
Hay-Bond treaty, Mr. Hunter said : "The 
feeling of the people of the Island is un- 
doubtedly for the treaty, and the mer- 
chants are, without exception, apparent- 
ly in favor of it. Though the people are 
in favor of the treaty, they are among 
th.- most loyal in the British Empire." 
He referred to the Newfoundland naval 
contingent as a splendid body of men, 
an i said that they were now serving un- 
der Commodore Montgomerie, on H.M.S. 
Charybdis, in Venezuelan waters. 

" Th« revenue of the colony during the 
past year has been the largest on re- 
cord," -aid Mr Hunter. " It is interest- 
in-' to i.ote that the total value of the 
im) orts and exports for the past year 
had reached the handsome sum of $17, 

000,000. 

I Hi: LUMBER INDUSTRY. 
The lumber business is growing in 
ini[ ortance, and forging ahead by leaps 
an ' bounds. American capitalists, as 
well as Canadians, seeing the large area 
of virgin forests, a'e purchasing lands 



and developing on everj quarter, So far, 
llie leading lumber interests are owned 
by The Louis (Killer Co., Limited, of 
Crieff, Scotland. This company expects 
to have an almost immediate output 
from its various mills of 10,000,000 feet 
per annum." 

Mi Hunter said the mineral wealth of 
the colon} was verj -real, and that the 
mining of iron, pyrites, and copper, was 
being pushed in all directions. The iron 
mines at Hell Island and The Cape Cop- 
per Company's properties are being ex- 
tensively developed. Slate mining, he 
said, is al>i> being largely developed. This 
slate i- oi a- good quality as can be 
found in Wales, and in the course of time 
will be a valuable adjunct to the exports 
of the Island. 

[•HE REID SYSTEM. 

" The Reid Newfoundland Company are 
gradually perfecting their vast system of 
enterprises, and by degrees are getting 
their system into the same unexcelled 
shape as the C.P.R. The company's very 
handsome stone passenger station, for the 
west end of St. John's, is completed, and 
their large stall' will move in next month. 

' The sealing fleet is being prepared for 
the fishing in March, and it is expected 
that the usual large catch will be brought 
in." 

Mr. Hunter has been stationed at St. 
John's for seven years, and he says the 
people of the Island are of an exceeding 
kindly disposition, and welcome 'Strang- 
ers to their shores, to whom they are in 
every respect most hospitable. Mr. Hun 
ter is now on his vacation, and thi> 
morning he will leave on a trip to the 
Southern States. 



OFFICERS OF NEW YORK MER- 
CHANTS' ASSOCIATION. 

A meeting of the board of directors of 
The Merchants' Association of Now York 
was held on Januarv 16 at the office of 
the Association to elect officers and organ- 
ize For the ensiling year. The personnel 
of the board was somewhat changed at 

the annual meeting of the members held 
on the 13th inst. It is now constituted ' 
as follows : Win. F. King, John C. 
Eames, W. A. Marble, Gustav H. Schwab, 
I). Le Roy Dresser, Geo. F. Crane, 
Adolph Openhym, Geo. L. Duval, Geo. 
Fredk. Victor, Herbert L. Satterlee, Henry 
R. Towhe, Frank Squier, J. Hampden 
Dougherty, Clarence Whitman, and Clar- 
ence W. Seamans. 

D. Le Roy Dresser, the president of 
the Association, tendered his resignation 
as president, being unable to devote bis 
time to the work of the Association owing 
to pressure of other business. The follow- 
ing officers were elected for the ensuing 
year : 

Clarence Whitman, of Clarence Whitman & Co., 
president. 

Gustav H. Schwab, of the North German Lloyd 
S.S. Co., first vice-president. 

John C. Eames, of The H. B. Clafiin Co., 
second vice-president. 

W. A. Marble, of the R. & G. Corset Co., 
secretary. 

Geo. L. Duval, of Beeche, Duval & Co., 
treasurer. 



The Algoma Supply Company, general 
merchants, Sault Ste. Marie, has assign- 
ed to D. I. Millar ; a meeting of creditors 
will be held on January 22. 



APOLLO BEST BLOOM 
GALVANIZED IRON 

Galvanized iron ought to 
be soft flat uniform true to 



gauge. 




Apollo is guaranteed to 




be so. 




American Sheet Steel Company, New York 




Representatives for Canada 

11. & S. If. Thompson & Company 

63 Sul pice Street 

Montreal 






- 







II 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




ROYAL-CANADIAN 

is H. Boker & Co's. best concaved plain Razor. Finest Quality without waste on 
fancy work. Lowest price for the very finest grade of goods. 

The brand is registered at Ottawa. 

For sale by all Leading Wholesale Houses. 
CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



.I.lliuan ."■ 1909 

These pin mch qualities and 

quantities us are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms "t credit, the 
lowest Bguree being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay Large cash buyers can fre 
uuentlj iiiak.pnirliiis.-nr bettor priced The 
K.liioi is anxious to bo informed el 

any apparent a n this list, as the desire 

la to make it perfectl] accurate 

METALS. 

TIN 
I. Hint. an. I Flag and 8t rail - 

Wand 28-ll> bigots, 1001b 139 00 • 

TXNPLATEB, 

.1 Plates B 
M i l8 , i qua! ; Per box. 

I c usual sizes 

l \ - 

iw 

Famous, equal to Bradley 

I c 5 7S 

l \ 

I \ \ 

....I Vulture I ■ 

[ C, usual sizes ■ 

I \ ■' ....6 mi 

i\\ : oo 

IX XX 8 00 

DC, l-J xi; 4 50 

DX 

l> \ \ BOO 

C<ik. Plat Bi ighl 
n. r St.-.'l 
i I usual sis . 14x20 4 ini 

li'. spi . i.l -i/. v base 4 "<n 

9 00 
Charcoal Plates Teroe 
Dean <>r .1 U Grade 

1x38 II. sheets 
i \ reme Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler PI 
4 ix.kU-y Grade 

\ \. ; bxs i 

14x60 roo 

" 14x06, > 

Till 1 Sir 

IXxSOui 8 

•■ 

ICiiN \M> -I BEL 
m bar. pel 100 lb 

■n " I 40 

II ! steel. I '. to i 

.led, 2 in 

- el ■.' 30 '.' 50 

i machinery 

.Ik steel ! - 

T Firth ' Heel per lb 134 

- t....l steel ii 14 

13 
Black Diamond and ' B I 

I n in II u 

i| steel p 00 » OS 

I steel i. 13 II 

Spei ial ' 'i IS ii '.li 

i |n ii •.ii 

" Air Hardening" 

teel, per lb 08 10 

i •■ ' 1 1 IK rUBES i 

ind 4 inch 'I 00 

'4 in. 11 P. 

11 P, 
t i" 31 



STEEL BOILEB PLATE 

1 in 2 60 -• 80 

... 260 2 7ii 

, in 11111I thicker 2 50 2 60 

BLAI R SHEETS Com D.Fl 

In .in. 1 12 ..in.. 2 SS 2 7". 

18 gaugt 2 v, 3 00 

2 85 3 IX) 

22 1.. 21 

3 06 :i m 
.3 16 

t OPPEB WIRE 

Discount, 50 pi 



1 \\ \n\ PLATES 

All dull. 52 sheets 2 at) 3 mt 

Half polished :'. 00 3 10 

\n bright 3 7.". 3 85 

[EON PIPE 
Blaok pipe Pet 100 feel 

I inch 3 (XI 

I " 2 30 2 til 

i " 2 66 

i " 

1 '• 5 20 

U •' 7 35 

8 95 

2 ■' 12 V. 

21 INI 

3 " 25 00 

3J •' 32 ini 

■ 4 " 

1 t:. ini 

5 " 48 00 

63 00 

GalVanlzed pii*- 
inch 

" 

" 

" .". Kl 

1. 10 06 

12 20 

2 " 11! 85 

Malleable Flttii D Hint 30 p.c 

1 
On liiiiiiKs. Including plugs, 

bushings, unions mi. I nipples, 50a In p . dla. 
All others discount 60 1. 1 

1. \l \ wi/KH SHEETS Queens 

' C 1 lt.ll Bead 

16 gauge. 

1 gaugi 1 ix"> 3 75 3 75 1 06 
125 40 

1 SO 1 25 1 06 4 .mi 

Allien, an hrs 

Iota in to l." 

1 II UN 

■ 

7 86 In 

1 50 1 7. 

4 2. I « 

I 211 4 10 

4 06 4 H 

4 ini I 50 

I ini I 'I, 

Halter, kennel and i«.«i .1 I • and 

5 pet cent. 
1 ..» ties tn p . 

Tie 1. nt chains 
stidl tixrnr. - 

15 p < 
Jack chain, ir..n. single ami double, discount 

.i.i.k chain, brass, s ogle .111.1 double, .li- 
oount ; 

I - . 



t ui'i'Ki; 

Ingot Pi . 100 lb 

13 .'ill 

Luke Superioi 

Hals 
tin lengths, round, | i" | in 23 00 
round and square, 
1 to 2 inches 23 00 
Bbej 1 
Plain, 14 ../ . mnl light, 16 >>/. . 

14x48 and 14x60 .. 22 00 22 SO 

Plain, 14 ../ . un.l light, 16 "/... 

Irregular sizes 22 50 23 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 ini 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x8 ft . 26 to 30 Hi. each, per lb 23 

•• 35 to 45 •• 22 

" 50 n> and above u 21 

BOILEB AM» T K I'lTTS 
Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BBASS. 
Bod and Sheet, It to 30 gauge, 15 pet cent 
Sheets, h»rd>rolled, 2x4 
Tubing, base, per lb. 

zim SPELTER 
i ign, per 100 lb 5 50 6 ini 

Domestic 

ZIM -III I I 
6-cwt. casks 6 00 6 26 

Pari casks 6 25 6 50 

LEAD 

Imported Pig, i» i 1001b 3 50 

Bar. per lb 06 

21 lb sq. ft., by roll . 'i 'N.. 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 08 

N..i i i n : r li. . exirs l*i|M-. 

by the roll, usual "•eights per yard, lists at 7c 
p.rii. ana37ip.c dis f.o.b. Toronto 

Nor. Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 

ngths, lists ui Be 

SHOT. 
Common, 86.50 per Hn) ii. . chilled, ~7 ini 
pei pni II. . buck, s.-al and hall M iO D 

p into b To 

Hamilton, Montreal. St. John and Halifax 
3 p o cash, freights equalized 

SOIL PIPE Wl> FITTINGS 
Light s-.il pipe, discount, t.'» pet cenl 

fittings, discounl 
Med. and K\tiah--av> pipe and fittings, dis 50 
ami HI p.r cenl 

•Mill 4'. pel . .lit 

-. .1 in B Pet lb 

.1 and half, guarantet .1 20 

it end-half. commercial 19 

Refined 

Wiping 'I 17 

\\ I IM'iW 

p. i lb 

\\ III I I I I \H I 

Hi 

N i 

\ 

\ i 

Mum.. - Select Flaki H I 

Elephant and I 

B B Genuine 7 ini 

v, 1 ..III 

\i ...h brand 
i. Pure 

mine 



I : I . l ■ LEAD 

Genuine, 560 lb casks, per cwt »t ;. 

le, Iini II, k. igs, 
No I 180 i 1 . • ui .. p. i . ui 
No I. iini ii. kegs, per cwt 4 SO 

H nil 1 zim 

Ext ra Bed >■ al 08 08 

No. 1 11 06i 07 

DEI WHITE 1.1 \J> 

Pure, casks 
Pure, kegs 

bsks 
No 1. kegs 

PREPARED CAIN I - 

I . ami 1-gaUon tins 

Pure, p.i gallon 1 26 

Second qualil ii 1 no 

1 '.«i 

The si,. 1 « m \\ lUlams paii 1 in 

I ana. la Paint Co 1 pm . ] ] , 

T to Lead ft t lolor Oo'sp 

pure i 20 

Stewart A Wood ■ < ibampion 

pure i ini 

Standard Paint 1 o i Nt » 

1 . ■ I 30 

The I . 

British NaT] deck I |0 

Hollywood pasts pain) l 411 
liquid paint 

Boot paint i 26 

i DLOBS l\ i. II. 

35 li. in.-. Standard '/.. . 

v. ii.tiau red, per lb 04 

< In yellow oil I 

Golden ochre u us 10 

French " ... 

Marine black 09 

ii pi 

French Imperial gn • n 12 

Signwritert black Hi 

Ullrilt umber l| |1 

<l II 

Kim umber 11 n 

sienna 

1 OLOB8, im:\ 
t ominon ochre, bbb 1 20 1 H 

Y.UOW. h I Mis, |,|.|. 

yellow ochre (La B 1 15 I 15 

1 

Venetiai 1.1.1 

»t 
\111.ri. an oxides, bbls 

( ana.liau oxides, l-'-i- ' _ . 1 7". 

super magnetic oxidi • 

Ituriit sienna, pin. |., , \\, 

umber, 
Baa umber 
Drop blaok, put 
t limine yellow, pm 
I hrom. greens, pun i 
Golden ... I 
Ultramarine blui 

Kin- pr. ».t n. 
Genunii I i I 

Whiting, bhl 
English >• -uiiili 

BLI E8TON1 

10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WADE & BUTCHER'S 

"SPECIAL" Razors 

Are unequalled for quality and finish. 

JAMES HUTTON 6c CO., - MONTREAL 



Sole Agents for Canada. 



rrn v 

Bulk in Mil.. 1 90 

Bulk in leas quantity 

Bladder* in obis 135 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 «) 

Bladders in 35 lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12) II. tins 2 6"> 

Bladders in bulk or Una leas thaa 100 lb. 9 90 

ui:s l»n l B 

Iii 5-gal. lota. Per gal. Net 

Carriage, No. 1 ... 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable Wxly 4 10 4 25 

nibbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, Japan 2 85 3 00 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic .uik 1 50 

Furniture, extra 125 

N.. 1 1 10 

Hard u il finish 1 65 1 75 

Light oil finish 1 40 1 60 

Datnar 1 70 1 85 

Shellac white 2 35 2 43 

orange 2 25 2 35 

Turpentine, brown japan — 125 130 

black japan 85 1 20 

N.i 1 50 75 

Rlastilite varnish, l gaL .an. each. 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gaJ 2 75 

Maple Leal coach enamels; size l, $1.30: 

size 2. 70c : six.- 3, 40c each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish. ;. 
case, Groin | pte. to 1 gal, S3 50. 

. VSTOB OH 

Bast India, in cases, per lb. 09J 10 

small lots 10 101 

COI ETC. 

God oiL per gal 050 055 

Pure ..live 1 20 

neatsfoot 90 

Common 08 09 

French medal 10 II 14 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 25 30 

Strip 18 20 

19 20 

Hiittner 15 16 



HARDWARE. 

V M M I SI I I . . N 

Cart; il 

I; B. Capi Dominion, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Run Fire Pistol, .lis.-. .urn 40 pc., American. 
Kim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p i 
Central Fir. Pistol and Rifle, 10 pc, Amer 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes. Domin- 
ion, 30 per 

Central Fir. Cartri ing and Mili- 

tary. Dominion, IS per cent, 

Central Fire. Military anil Sporting, An 

ican, add 5 per cent to li-' B B I ape, 

ml 4iJ |H-r lent . American. 
I/.aded an.l empty shell.. "Trap" anil 
•'Dominion grades, 3G per cent. Riial 
ami Nitro. 10 per cenl advance on Usl 
Brass Shot Shells. .",". per cenl 
Primers. Don> . 30 percent : American 

Wads per lh. 

i. k white felt wadding, in ,11. 

bags 1100 

grey felt wails, in 
J-lh. bag* . 70 

Best thick white card wads, in b 

■ ■! each, 12 and smaller gauges 
Best thick white .aril wails, in boxes 

MJ0 each. 10 gauge OS", 

,rd wads, in boxes 

• 00 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 ami smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

10 gauge 25 

Thin card wad*, in boxes of 1,000 
- saugi 



Chemically prepared black edge grey 

eloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

'.' ami It) gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 110 

Superior chemically prepared pink 

edge, best white eloth wa.ls. in 

boxes of 250 each 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 -T I 65 

5 and 6 " I 90 

U>ZES 

Discount 30 per cent. 

ISMI.S 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 105 

Hay Kudden, 80-lb. and over 09} 

Brooks. 80-lb. and over 11} 

AUOKRs 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit. per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit. " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes. 40 per cent 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

vm.k ORE v-i 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

BATH Tl'KS 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 per cent, off revised list 

BATHS. 

Standard Enameled. 

54-inch rolled rim. 1st quality 34 00 

:,[ 2nd " 20 00 

BABBIT METAL. 

"Tandem," A per lb. o 27 

B " 21 

C " 11$ 

Frictionless Metal " 23 

Hercules ' 15 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, 44 

Tough, " 40 

" 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co : 

Imperial, genuine 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star l:. 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No 3 06 

No 4 05 

BELLS 

Band 

i. ■ 80 per ..-Hi 

Niekel, 55 pel cenl 

Cow 

American make, discount 63J percent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

- Saigant's 5 50 8 1X1 

Pi .. rl.oro, discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 
American, each 125 3 oo 

House. 
American, i>er lb 3". o 411 

BELI.o" II 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 7'. 

Moulders', per doz 7 sn 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount per cent 



BELTING. 

Extra. 60 pel cant 
Standard, 60 and 10 pet cent 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in.. 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent 
Rockford. discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Uen., net list. 
Car 
Gilmour's, 47j to 50 per cent. 
Expansive 
Clark's, 40 percent. 

Gimlet 

Clark s, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07i 0"13 

BOLTS AND NUTS. Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 55 audio 
" full sq. (.*2.40 list) 55 and 10 
" Norway Iron (#3 

list) 50 and 10 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 50 and 10 

Plough Bolts 50 and 10 

Blank Bolts 50 ami 10 

Bolt Ends 50 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65 ami 10 

I ', iach Screws, cone point 663 and 10 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3i'c. per lb. off 
Nuls, hexagon, all sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods, per lb., 5$ to 6c. 
Nuts, in 50-lb. lots, }c. per lb. extra: in less 
than 50-lb. lots, $c. extra. 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE HOODS. 

I lis,., unt 62$ per cent. 

BROILERS. 
Light . discount 65 to 67$ per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 67$ per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., discount 37$ per cent 

Herds, No. 8 per doz 6 (X) 

Henis, No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 1100 

American " 12 00 20 00 

BUTCHER KM\ Is 

Baileys per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 1 75 

Ready rooting, 2-ply. not under 45 lb,, 

per roll 90 

Ready rooting, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 00 

Dry Sheathing ... per roll, 400 sq. ft. 35 

Tar " " 400 " 45 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 50 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 60 

i) K .<c I XL... " 400 " 65 

Resin-sized " 400 " 40 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 110 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Hoof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Beflned Tar per barrel 4 50 

Cal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. II 15 

Roofing Pitch per 1001b. 85 

BULL RINOS. 
Copper, 82.00 for 2$-inch. and §1.90 for 2-inch. 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 
Oast Iron. 

Pin, discount 60 tier cent. 

4fi 



Wrought Steal 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 ami 21 p, i mil 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 2$ percent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70, 70 and 5 percent 
Gen. Bronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz, 1 00 1 50 

Bollard's " .... 6 50 

OASTORB 

Bed. new list, discount 55 to 57i per cent. 
Plate, discount 52$ to 57 J per cent 

CATTLE LEADERS 

(foe. 31 and 33 per gross 8 .Mi 9 50 

1 II W.K. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 
Socket. Framing ami Firmer 
Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's. discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
P. S, ft W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent 

CHURNS. 

Revolving Churns, metal frames No. 0, S8 
No. 1, s'8.50: No. 2. $9.00; No. 3,810.00; 
No. 4, K12.00: No. 5, S16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames, 20c. each less than the abovi 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 53 
per cent. ; from stock in Montreal, 51 per 
cent. Terms 4 months or 3 per cent, cash in 
30 days. 

Churn frames, including bearings, levers, etc. 
Nos. 0, 1, 2 and 3, wood, #2.40: and 4 and 
5, 12.65. Metal frames, 25c. extra. Dis- 
count 15 per cent., net 30 days. 

CLIPS. 

Axle, discount 65 per cent. 

closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet... S9 60 
Emb. " " •' 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Ten. Syphon Washout 6 00 
Emb. " " " ..6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain . . 9 60 
Low " ' 7 " emb... 10 20 

Plain Richelieu 3 75 

Emb. " 4 00 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down i lot alio Syphon Jet, plain 11 70 
Low " " " emhd 12 30 

I 111 .set connect ion 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 70 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Be in.. " 19 x 15-in 2 25 

I IIMPASSKS, DIX 'HIKES, ETC. 

American, discount 62$ to 65 per cent. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE, 

Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 

< l: \ Dl. KS, IIRAIN. 
Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

IKOSSI'I I s V W It VNDI.KS. 

S. & D, No. 3 per pair 17$ 

s ft I)., " 5 '' 22$ 

S. &D., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

DOOR SPRIMIS 

Torrey's Rod (15 p.c), per doz. . • . 2 00 

Coil " 88 1 60 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 
Coach and Wagon, discount 50 and 10 per 

• •-•if 
Carpenters', discount 60 and 10 percent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

Has it Ever Occurred to You 

that you could largely increase your business, confer a favor upon us, and benefit your customers by 
advising them to use our Building Papers, Roofing Felts and Wire Edged Ready Roofing ? 

We will guarantee to supply you with the best of material, but, you must do the missionary work 
among your customers. 

The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



Toronto and IVior-»-trea I 



nit ii.i.~ 

H.iml end I: 
M ilia i B Fall-, per do/ , ml list 

hull I 
M MM] rent 

Standard, diaoounl SO ana 5 to 66 per eenl 

I VI . 1 I - 

Common, cork lined, diaoounl 3B pel cent 

i vv i u: n- 

10 Inch pi I 100 fc 3 10 

pa i 
5 end 6-lnoh, common pel doi l 90 

7 inch " l» 

Polished, 15o per dozen ezl ra 

HOI i. in o\, 

Mi>. ..mil in per cent 

i -. i i. hi on pure 
[ton, diaoounl 10 per cent 

PAOIOM Mil K i vn- 
Dtaeounl ofl ret [a* d list, in pei een 

I II.K- IM. B iSTt 

H i n 7" and in per cent. 

7n " 10 

k. uriiev \ Foot 7n •' 10 

Diastona 7" " in 

\ni.l]'.in 70 " 10 

.! Barton Smith 70 " 10 

M.i llellan 70 " 10 

7<i " 10 
Si. holson, 60anil 10 to 60, 10 and 5 
Royal 80 

70 to 75 
Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and ■ pet 

cent 
. i. .»nt -. English list, 35 to 374 i" ' eenl 
Nicholson File c. b Simplicity ' file handle, 
per gross BSo. to si. 50. 

.1 LBS 
Win. l..w Boi I 

stur ii Diamond 

i nit i-.l Per Per Per Pei 

[nohea 50fl 100 ft SO ft 100 ft 

Undi r i H tli 

i" 4 65 

«1 to. "hi 5 10 .... 7 GO 

60 6 36 .... 8 50 

61 to TO r» 75 .... 9 75 

71 to 80* IX . 1100 

81 to 85 7 00 

Ml 7 ffi 15 00 

17 50 

100 '.-O 50 

•At an 
Marking, Koftbe, i 

Staid- 

Win- ' I . u-. - 

Winn a No- 36 to S3 mob l 06 

li vi 1 1 M 

. inch pei gross 

Rope, j " 

. to i inch " .... 14 in 

leather. 1-Inch per dos. 3 871 

Leather, 1J " i 16 i (0 

w*\ ■■ in 

II VMMKKM 

Nail 

Maydole a diaoounl S to 10 per cent Oenei Ilan 
diaoounl 25 to 2T| per i - 

Tack 

tic pel •!../ 1 10 1 Jo 

aiedaa 
■ in pet lb 

Ball I 

: in. pet lb 53 96 

II VNI 

kit pet doz net i 69 3 00 

-I per doa l 00 I 66 



I l; 



Port 
ttaoounl M pet oent rei h* -i 

ii... 
i \ n diaoounl ifl pet oent . rei Lead 

Saw 
American |ier do/. I 00 

Plane 

Aineriean pet groel 3 16 

lluinnler an.l llatchel 

Oanadlan, discount -to pet o nt 

• loss Cut Sl|VI- 

t'aniiiliiin pet pait 



Hat 
bat 

l 16 
3 75 

n 13] 



II VN..I Bl 


doz 


pain. 




S 85 


6 00 


Bteej na, l-inch 










6 50 


Lane i coveted 










8 40 


V 111, 10-foot rim 




10 80 


No 13, 10-foot rim 




IS 60 


No. 14, l.Y loot run 




U no 


Lane i < » NT track, pet tool 




044 



HAHVKNT T .- 

Diaoounl 60 and 10 pet cent 

II V I. Ill I- 

Canadian, diacount 10 to 43] percent 

IIIN. 

Blind, Parker's, diac it 16j pei cent 

II. hi T and strap, 4-in . |ier Ih 06 

5-in , " 06J 

i. in . 06 

8-in, " .0 05] 

10-in. 054 

lii^ht T and strap, diaoounl 65 and 5 per cent. 
Sen w hook anil hinge 

10 in per 10.) Hi. 4 SO 

12 in up " 3 25 

Spring pergro, pairs .... 10 50 

BO] B 

Garden, Mortar, etc- . diaoounl 60 to 60 mid in 

pel .'lit 

Planter per dos. 4 00 4 50 

HOI. loW VV VII 

Diaoounl 45 and 5 per cent 

BOOKS 

Cast Iron. 

Binl oagt . i«t doz. o 60 1 10 

Clothe* line " . 27 63 

II . tieaa " 72 88 

Hat and coat per Km. 100 3 00 

Chandelier perdoi 50 100 

Wrought Iron 

Wrought hooks and staples, Oanadlan dia 

i-oitnt 47' per cent. 

Win 

-..I i oat. discount 4,". per oent 

Bell tier 1.101 11 go 

bright, discount 56 per cent. 
hokm: NAILS 
"C brand, 40. in and 71 percent off list I Oral 

M I and, 60, 10 and 6 Js-r lent , head 

■ 1 sunk, 65 per cent 

\| n ireh. Int per cent 

50 and 71 |M-r cent 'lis 

■onamoi - 

FOB Montreal 

No | N ; 
Iron finnei and and 

larger smaller 
Light, medium and heavy 3X. 3 60 

.1 60 3 85 
- 
Light 16 3 70 

Peathenreighl iall Bizeal 1 • 

I'll: roronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c [«t k.-i; nddiiional 

I 711 

I VI VNNM. w VII 

...it 6 |xt cent off I 

1. l IT. k- 

star perdoi I 



h 1. 1 I 
Bi ri ent. diaoounl oil new list 

pm ib 11 .to si 

Aineriean. 60 and in to li", .m.i 5 pet eenl 

hi. V- 

Look, Canadian dis in to m and 10 pet oent 

l, trunk and padlock, 

\ .... i i.-iiii p. i gn ea n ini 

hNoll, 

I lOOl |ev] neil and N.I' . iier 

doz. l .'in 2 50 

Bei ho !■• i .1../ I 75 .1 36 

Bronze, Genuine 6 00 I 

Shutter, porcelain, P. 6 L 

a per gross I 30 

Whitedooi knobs. ...perdoz. 96 i 00 

II V\ KNIV I - 

N.i prices 

LAMP \v li h- 

Discount 60 pei cent 

I VN I I l: s- 

fold Blast pet d'./ 7 00 

No 3, "Wright ■ 

Ordinary, nithO burner. ... t 00 

Dashboard, cold blaal " 9 on 

N,. 

Japanning, 50o perdoz. extra. 

I.IM.iN -o| IT/KltS 

.in lined per doz 2 30 ■'> 'in 

Galvanized " 1 87 3 85 

King, wood " 2 76 -' '"' 

King lai " 4 no I ."si 

All flims " (I .'id '.«i 

I INI - 

Pish per atom 1 Oi 2 .'si 

Chalk 1 90 7 411 

I. V VV N V|.,VV I I - 

Woodyatt. 12-in wheel 7 .'SI 

Star 

Daisy t 90 

Philadelphia, 10-in. wheel t 00 

12 75 

I ■ ..int. "SI pel e. Ill 

LOt h- 

Canadian, to to 40 and lo pei 

Russell & Krvvin ,, .perdoz 3 (HI 3 2i 

Caliinet 

Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 
Padlocks 

Kiik'lish and Am |mt do/ I) .ill c no 

Scandinavian " 1 IX) 2 40 

BagJe, discount 20 to 25 per cent 

M V. IIIN I -. I: I VV - 
I and Bra — 

Plat head, diaoounl 25 per ent 
Round head, discount 20 per cent 

M M I 

Tinsmith- perdoi 1 36 1 .'si 

Oarpentera', hickory, 1 25 

Lignum Vita. 3 85 '. 00 

Caulking, each >'■'' 

M VTTo. h- 

i median i»-r dnz 

M I VI . I 1 . ■ 

\ an, diaoounl 33] pet 

Oernian. li imt eenl 

each 1 15 

mii.k i vn rJUaTsnxog 
Dlscounl 26 pei 

N VII - I HI 

3d and 3.1 .1 |fi 

3d 3 111 3 12 

4 and 5d 2 66 2 95 

Kami 7d I 76 2 80 

Id 2 60 2 60 

13d 
16 and 2nd 

30. 40. 50 and isikl lha.se) 
Cut nails in .-arlots 5i 

lils in carl..' 
Cut nails iti .arlots are 63 41) liase 

Galvanizing 3c jst l)> net 
It nails 10c. eiira. 
M ellaneous wire nails, discourj 

■ nt 

Kl-.ur l.arrel nails, diaoounl - 



n VII. IT I l 

Germs id American 

N VII 

Square, round an 

.i.l 13 in 

POI LTKM Nil i in.. 

■j in Hi th, 19 •■> ■ 

2-ln \l o ,, ,- 

o V h I vi 

!•. i inn II, 
I - V.vv 

on i 

v s \to.iei galvanised 

oil can. witli pump, j gallon, 

it >. in iii 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, "si ami In p. 

( loppei p. i .1../ i 

I 'i 
H ible, discount 36 per cent 

■ VI V VNI/t I. | VII.- 

Dufferio pattern pail.-, discount I 
Flaring pattern, discount li percent 
.I/, d washtuba, diacount i 

ITU in w . 
40 pel . e||t off li-r • 

10-ql flaring sap buckets, dia 

I'.. II) ami 14 <p Bsril 

Creamet cana, diaoounl 10 per cent 

IT. K- 

Pet dozen g on 9 on 

IT. I I III N v II.- 

Poroelain head pergrosa l 3i l si 

Brass head i ,,, 

IT. II IT Will 

Tin ami Kilt, discount 75 per cent 

i-ini: TAR 

1 pint in tin- i»-r Kros» 

, .. 

Pl.A N I - 

Wood ! iian diaoounl U 

loan diaoounl 50 pi i 
Wood, tansy Canadian or Aineriean, 374 lo 

40 per cent 

l-I.AVI. llti.N- 

Bnglish perdoz 2 00 

IT. II lis ASH MITT I - 

Bullous genuine, per .1../ pair-, dia 

37] '" ' 
Button - nun mi 9 00 

German "> 

III viit SS BJI v— BOOM 

ion work, dU 60 per eenl 

i M I' Cushion w.irk. diacount 50 pel 
Fuller w.irk. d cent 

md over of the abovi 
counl In per . eni 
Lever handle stop- ami H 
pet cent With, in lots .,f 2.1../. ■ 
an extra diaoounl of in jmt eenl 
■I M I 01 \i.k'l.. and I I 

diaoounl 55 |sr cent 

■id Check \ 
discount 65 per cent 
I M r Badiatoi Valvi -. dl 

c-eilt 

diator Valvi - 
Patent Qoiok <>p, njng \ i 

|MT . ■ 

No * 

No 7 Fuller - 

S I 

Patent Compi .in, basin 

■ 
N . - . 6t 

•'. h1t»». 
Comp. 



47 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS 



-TO IMPORT. 



Prompt Deliveries 



EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 

BEN1 GLASS °f a " kinds, our own manufacture. Closest 



rices. 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



Warerooms and Offlces-135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works 200 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



PRE8SE1 
Discount 221 i«r cent 



n LLBI a 

pei ■!.>/ ii 55 1 00 
ii 22 33 

a 27 1 oi 

•■ 



Hothoun 

Vxlc 
Screw 

Owning 

im MPS 

Canadian cistel n 1 80 3 150 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

ii n. lit - 

Saddlei - i» i doz 1 ih) l 85 

Conductor's " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', soli. I perset 72 

hollow per inch .... 1 00 

l; i\..l BOILERS 

Dominion, 3ij gallon net 6 mi 

35 " " 7 00 

40 " " 8 00 

Ronald's Galvanized, 30 gallon, " 1 W 

35 - ■■ a |0 

40 •■ •• g 60 

i ,,, r, 30 gallon " 22 00 

•■ 35 • " 24 00 

4ii " " 28 00 

Discount off i opper boilers 15 per cent 

• RAKES 

Wood per ilo/. net 1 20 up 

per doss. 

4 00 18 00 



r. LZORS 



4 00 


18 (X) 


7 50 


11 00 


12 50 


15 00 


3 GO 


10 00 


7 00 


12 00 


E mi 


12 03 


in 00 


11 00 




15 it" 




ID 75 




13 oo 




13 50 




13 50 



EUiol s 

itlei B&Co B 

linkers 

EingCuttei 

Wade S Butcni i - 

Theile ft Quack B 

Ha i Icy s 

Bailey's Brantford 

I ' . 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 

Griffon No. 65 

criffnn Safety Razors 

Griffon Stropping Machines 

ELBOW BUG 

Discount 40 pi 

RIVET* IMi Bl Kit* 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

In per cent 
Imn Burrs, discount 55 percent 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb 

per lb. 

.mi Imn Rivets in '11' cartons, Ic. 

per H> 
i oppei Rivets, will, usual proportion burrs, 4.) 

per cent discount Cain. us, l. per ll. 

extra, net 
Copper Butts only, discount 30 and in pi 
Extras on Tinned oi < oppered Rivets, i-lb. 

cartons, lc \ 

1. 1 ^ l l BETS. 

i„u, discount 35 to 37i per cent 

IV. 1-1 I I. 

n 12 

l»nr.- Manilla II 

"British Manilla 12 

( otton, 3-16 inch and largei o 16 

5-32 inch o 21 

S inch 22 

ii 15 

Jute 

l.ath Yarn, stogie 1 1 

double o II 

Sisal bed cord, 1* feel pi 
60 feel 

"75 95 

l:i LI 
,.|, discount 55 ami 10 per a nl 
i ni 371 to to pei cent 

-Mi lll'iv- 

M . p \ polished pei -■ i 7u 

.ii.Kl.-pl.i-. 
-KM. UTD I. Ml. El PAW l 

punt 4ij and 
discount 40 n t cent 

tdvance 
on : 



9 w bpoi rs 
Bronzed iron with li< .. >k~ pi i 1,000 9 iO 

BAWH 

Band, Disston's, discount l'-" percent 
S. ft 1) . discount 40 per cent 

« m Disston a .per foot 35 55 
S. .v. D-. .lis ount 35 pei oenl on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 7."> 

frame only 75 

- ISH w i:i.:n r* 

Sectional per loo lb. 2 50 2 75 

Solid " 1 ;."i 2 00 

s vsll . ..i:i. 

Per II. 23 30 

saw sets perdoz. 

Lincoln an. I Whiting 4 75 

Band Sets, No 1-Woodyatl [Morrill) 4 25 
X Cut Sets. No. 3 Woodyatl (Morrill) 9 50 

SCALES. 

Burrow, Stewart ft Milne 

Imperial Standard, discount 40percent 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 percent 
Champion Scales, discount 55 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
Dominion, discount 55 per cent 
Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 
Warren s new Standard, discount 41) percent 
Champion, discount 55 pei cenl 
Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent 

SCREW DRIVERS 

Sargent's per doz. 65 1 00 

SCREEN liDORS. 
Coininoii doors. 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained. 4-in style perdoz. 6 80 

Common doors,2or 3 panel, yellow and 

green stained, 4-in. style perdoz. 7 00 
t oininon doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 

colors, oil finish perdoz. 8 15 

3-in. style 20e. per dozen less 

SCREWS, 

W 1. P H . bright and steel, discount 67J 

and 10 per cent. 

Wood, Ii. B-, bright, dis. 82.'. and 10 per cent 
I' II . brass, dis 80 and 10 per cent. 
I; H . ' dis. 75 and 10 per cent 
1 II . bronze, .lis 75 per cent. 
" R H . " .lis. 70 per cent 

l)ri\c Screws, .lis. 87.; and 10 percent 
Ben. h, wood per doz 3 25 t 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

> i case hardened, dis 60 per cent. 
Square < lap, dia 50 and 5 per cent. 
Bexagon Cap. dis 45 per cent 
SCYTB BS 

Pei doz net 5 00 8 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS 

i anadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discount 60 

and 21 per cent 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Bandies, discount B7j 

per cent 
Seymour's, discount 50 ami 10 pel 

sl|..\ ELS IM' se IDES 
t anadian. discount 40 and 5 per cent 
SINKS. 



i. 111 \ 24. 
is x 30 
18 x 36. 



ii BS 

I mi 
1 ID 



^S U\s 

i Germ in, discount 25 p. . cenl 

Lock. Andrews 4 50 11 50 



1. 1 Lit. 

2-lb. o 



SOLDERING IRONS. 

pel 111 



34 



-•'I IRES. 

Iron. No 193 pet doz 2 4u 2 56 

•• No 194 

Use i 60 to I . cent 

i Bevel, discount 50 pen enl 

STAMPED w \ RE 

Plain, discount 75 and i ■ . .ti re 

' list 

Rel inned, disconol I 



STAPLES 

Galvanized 

Plain 2 90 

Coopers, discount 45 per cent 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 p. 

STOCKS A Mi DIES 

A inci ican discount 25 per cent. 



| ,11 
3 15 



00 
ii 07 
09 
13 

15 
II 50 

1 50 
o 10 
5 00 

25 00 
28 00 
2: 



7 00 
7 50 



4 80 
8 40 



Washita per lb. o 28 

Bindostan o 06 

slip " 09 

Labrador — 

Axe " 

'I'm Key 

Arkansas .... 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 

Scythe per gross 3 50 

Grind, 2-in.,40to 200 111., perton .... 

" under 40 lb., ' .... 

" under 2 in. thick, " 

sTo\ EPIPE8 

5 and l! inch, pel 1 IK) lengths 

7 inch " " — 

F.SAM EL INK. STOVE POLISH. 

No 4. 3 doz. in case net cash — 
No. 6, 3 doz. in asc. . " .... 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC, 

Carpel tacks, blued so and 15 

tinned 80 and 20 

(in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

J weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned 

tn bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', hulk . . .85, 12J and 121 
brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned ami 

japanned 75 and 121 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

( 'opper tacks 50 

< 'opper nails 52'. 

Trunk nails, I. lack 05 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned, 65 and 10 

Clout nails, hlned 65 anil 5 

( 'hail nails 35 

Patent brads 4ti 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

In bulk 15 

solid heads, in hulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " in hulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 

• is only 60 

Zinc glaziers points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

hulk... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

I \1'E LINES. 
English, ass skin . . per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9.75 

I 'hestcnnan B. . . Sach 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

I l\ s BUS SNIPS 
Bailey's, discount 25 per cent 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and lo 

per' c. til 

THAI'S (steel I 

Game, Newhouse, discount 25*percent. 

came, H. ,v. N.. P. S, & W.. 65 per i enl 

i lame, Bteel <"'-"■ 75 I"' 1 cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount lo per cenl 

i in per dOZ. 1 7.i 

S ft I) . disci. lint 35 per cent 
TWINES 

Bag, Russian per Hi 

\\ rapping, cotton, 3-ply 

4-ply 

Mattress per lb. 

Staging 



33 

27 



\ IsEs 



Wright i 



Brook's 

Pipe Vl-. Hill-' N" I 

No 2 

Saw Vise 



6 oo 



27 
19 
23 
45 
35 

13.'. 

o i2j 

3 50 
6 50 

9 mi 



ENAMELLED WARE. I 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent dlscouni 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. 
W I It E 
Smooth Steel Wire. 

No. 0-9 gauge $ 2 50 

V .. 6c. extra. 

. .. 12c. '■ 

20c. 

H .. 30c • 

\* 40c. 

Id \z,, • * 

lo 70c " 

Add 60c. for coppering and$2for tinning 
Extranet per 100 II, oiled wire 10c 
spring wire 81.25, special hay haling wire 30c 
oesl steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 15c 
charcoal (extra quality) f 1.25, packed in .asks 
'"' i Ca SSfii s .' 1, ' 1 KK |,, t-' and papering 10c.. 50 
and loon, bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, to .i a,..l Kill., bundles 25c, in 1-lb 
hanks, 50c, in 1-lh. hanks 75c, in ill, 
hanks si ' 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent, 
last of extras: In 100-11, , lots: No 17 
v' £°'J 8, !r 5 - 5 S No. 19, $6 No. 20, $6.65- 
■>," SJ8 N c "'^ N 0-23,'«7,65 No 
24 ss No 2:., s9 No. 26. S9.50 No 27 
MO No. 28. fl] No 29, $12 No 30 M3- 
Xo.31.sl4 No 32, $15 N,,33.sp; N ;,^4. 
' .,' ^- X ';' ,s '"' 'nincil wire. Nos. 17-25 

fe Nos,2«',.il.s4 N„s .32-34. k Cornered 
5c- oihng hi. ,„ 25-lb. bundles, 15c. in 5 

and 10-11, bundles, 25c. in 1 II, hanks. 25c 

m Mb. hanks, 38c in j-lt, hanks. 50o 
packed m casks or cases, !.„•. bassins nr 

pap, ring. 10c B 

Brass wire, discount 62J per cent, off the list 
< opper wire, discount 62 J per cent net .ash 

3o days, to. I, factory. 

¥° ",', SJ ? Nos rt ' 7 ' ». 93.15 to #3.35 

No, 9, S2.50 No 10, $3.20 to s3.4(i 

No. 11, $3.25 t„ s3. 45 No 12 12 65 

,- N ".,'-a\ S i 7 " , N " U Wreto'$3.95-No 

,■',• fl ,„S° 1,J ' S4 ' 30 ' Base sizes, Nos, 

6 to 9 $2.27} fo.l. Cleveland. In carlo.s 

12'c less. 

'''.'."J- 8 y»i', w iic. regular 7 strand, No. 17. 
$4:65; No. 18 $2.90; No 19, s2.H0. Hollow 
i. strand. N... 17. S4.30; No. 18, $2.70: No 
19, $2 35; No 20. $2 > .30, f.o.ii. Hamilton, 
lorontii. Montreal 

WIRE FENCING 

i .ah ani/, d barb 2 90 

Galvanized, plain bwisl 2 '10 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b, Cleveland, s2 551 in 

less than .allots, and S2 15 in (allots 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 
High Carbon, No. 9 s2 75 

;: go. }' 3 40 

No. 12 2 95 

WISE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per Kltlsn. ft., net 1 4(1 

Terms, 3 percent, off 30 days. 
w ISTE COTTON. 

Colored per lb. o 06 

White •• 08 

H l.-EM II Is 

Acme, discount 35 to 37J pet cent. 
Agricultural, discount 60 percent 
Coe's Genuine, discount 20 to 25 per cent 
Towers Engineer each 2 oo 7 oo 

■ s |..r doz. 5 80 6 ltd 

G. .V K. s Pipe " 3 4d 

Burrell s Pipe each 3 00 

Pookel per doz, 25 2 90 

WRINGERS 

Lender perdoz, 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian " 24 00 

Royal Am. i I. an " 2400 

Sampson " 24 oo 

Terms, t months, or 3 per cent 30 days 
WROUGHT lit. in WASHERS 
Canadian make, discount 40 percent 



48 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street. Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



"THE. EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 m; kV Besl value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export Wilh or without " Kiulyn ' 
I Patent Guard Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables— Kmlyn linRineering Works, 

Machinery," Newport. Newpokt, Mon., England. 

ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 

NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

y, nllf . M r FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Msnufscturers of ELECTROPLATE. . . . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 

KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32 Canada Llfo Bldg , MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS -" O" Brand Horse- Nails 
sea Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRA8SITE" GOODS - annn Caetor Co. 

Limited. Birmingham, Ens;. 



Always 
ask for 



"BAILEY" BRAND CUTLERY 



FULLY WARRANTED 






Complete Lines In 

Shears, Scissors, Razors, 

and Butcher Knives. 




° S 

ex •« 

-+ -i 

o <» 

<* -I 



BAILEY GUTLERY GO. 

BRANTFORD, CANADA. Limited 



CMAS. P. CLARK, President. 



JAkl.l) CHITT£.\l>eN. Treasurer. 



.ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilised World. 

Executive Offices: lfos. 346 and 848 Broadway, New York City, U.8.A. 

THE BRAD8TREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and the 

eon'.rolllug cucauiatauces of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, 
iiy the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating Information, no effort Is spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify lis claim an an authority on all matters 
tir,-<'iliig commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
iur ilabea Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

subscriptions are based on the service famished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
•nan lfacturlng concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial fiduciary and business corporations. (Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICE8 IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VA_NCOUVEK B.C. 



HAMIXTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC. QUE. 



LONDON. ONT. 
ST. JOHN. N.B. 
WINMl'Kii, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING Gtn. Man. Western Canada, Toronto. 




We Offer Something 
Better 



in the 



"Crown Huron" 



than in any other Range manufactured, and 
that is, it can be retailed at almost the cost of 
the higher-priced goods, which, in appearance, 
finish, and working qualities, are no better 
than ours. 

Every range fully warranted 
and guaranteed. 

Inquire for prices. 

THE WESTERN FOUNDRY CO., Limited, 



Quality First and Always. 



WINGI14M, ONT. 




Est. 1868 




Inc. 1896. 






Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




!! 



Awarded 
By JURORS ^ 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



► '%^»^VV%.'V^W'%.'%. 




PATENT INTERLOCKING 

RUBBER TILING. 

The most perfect floor covering for Hotels, 
Cafes, Business Offices, Banks, Court Rooms, 
Churches, Hospitals, Vestibules, Halls, Billiard 
and Smoking Rooms, Lavatories and Bath Rooms. 

NOISELESS NON-SLIPPERY 

WATERPROOF SANITARY 

Carefully selected range of soft, beautiful 
colors affording ample scope for combinations in 
harmony with surroundings. 

Write for Prices and Particulars 



Sola Canadian Manufacturers . 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms— 
46-47-4.9 West Front St. 



Factories— I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO. 



CANADA. 



To manufacturers of 



STOVES and RANGES 



We are now prepared to quote for the following : 

- - STEEL SHEETS - - 

Patent Planished Sheet (Russia) Iron Deweese Wood, 
Hammered Polished Steel Deweese Wood, Wellsville 
Polished, Canadian Blue, Oak Stove Body Sheets, Range 
Steel (Dead Flat , Open Hearth Sheets, American Bessemer 
Sheets, Bessemer Blue Annealed, Etc., Etc. 

Samples furnished on application. Write us with 
specification of your requirements, for which we 
shall be pleased to make special figures. 



B. & S. H. THOMPSON & CO 



LIMITED 



53 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

DOMINION OF CANADA SALES AGENTS FOR 

American Sheet Steel Company 



VARNISHES and JAPANS 

McCASKILL, DOUGALL & CO. 

Manufacturers MONTREAL 




Standard Railway and Carriage Varnisbes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Wont turn white from the effects of water and sun. 

Standard Piano, Furniture and Decorative Varnisbes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and Varnishes 
Architectural Varnishes 



OFFICES : 

161 Summer St., 30 St John St., 

BOSTON, Man., U.S.A. MONTREAL. 



Uniurpaued for Vain* 

and Service. 

Us. LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL. 



<Mr 



cA MAm Aar 



3*9 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal. Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada 



VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 31. 1903. 



NO. 6. 



yp*^ MANUFACTURER ^Cf 

ARROW#BRAND 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

% HARDWARE j 

e *f SPECIALITIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



}} 



"QUECN'J HE/1D 
QdLVdMZED IRON 



lUiaii 




1 



CANADA 



You get what you pay for, and 
don't have to pay too much, 
when you buy the 

"OLD RELIABLE." 



JOHH LTSAOHT, Limited, Maker*, A. C. LESLIE A CO., MOHTBEAL 
BRISTOL, E50. Managers Canadian Branch. 




ii 



Safford " Radiators 



Manufactured for Heating all 
classes of Buildings by Hot 
Water or Steam. Made in 
different heights, beautiful de- 
signs. Plain or Ornamental. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office and Works: DUFFERIN ST. '■■— " 



"TORONTO, CAN. 



GARDEN 

m 

O HOSE 

E 



N 
D 



n 




Our assortment of Lawn and 
Garden Supplies is most 
Complete embracing 


E 


HMOZZLES L SEATS 
COUPLINGS a VASES 
s TIES w MOWERS 
p REELS N SHEARS 




= Etc = 




WRITE FOR PRICES. 



LAWN REQUISITES 

RICE LEWIS & SON, 

N 



LIMITED 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets, 



SAMUEL, SONS £> BENJAMIN, 



London and Liverpool, England. 



«_ 

* 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington St. West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



We carry in stock a full line of the following goods: 



Iron — Band, Hoop and Rod. 

Black and Tinned Sheet. 
Galvanized, "Gordon Crown." 
Russia, Genuine and Imitation. 

Iron Pipe — Black and Galvanized. 

Lead — Bar, Pig and Sheet. 

Lead Pipe. 

Solder — Half and Half and Standard. 

Steel Sheets — Common and Dead Flat. 

Tin Plates — Charcoal and Coke. 

Tin— Bar. Ingot, "L & F." and Straits. 

Wire — Bright Iron and Coppered Iron. 

Zinc — Sheets and Block. 

INQUIRIES SOLICITED. PLEASE WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



izier s. 



Antimony. 

Brass — Sheets, Soft and Hard 
Rods and Tubes. 

Canada Plates. 

Copper — Bar and Ingot. 
Pitts. 

Rods and Tubes. 
Sheathing, Roofing and Bra 

Copperine"and Babbitt. 

Cotton Waste. 
l Crucibles. 
I Eave Trough — Also Spikes and Cond. Hooks 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

THEYRE ALL ALIKE 



THAT'S THE BEAUTY OF THE 




No 
Saw Edges 

No Soft Spots 

Temper Streaks 

Retiuwed Blade. 



Shave for Years 
equlring Honing 



Jobbers. 



BOOKLET 
COMINQ- 

if you'll ask for 
a copy with 
trade discount. 



A. L. SILBERSTEIN 



Mfrs. of y^/if] 



Cutlery 



453-461 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY. 



CR.Co. Star 



*** *** tS 




RED RUBBER PACKING 

FOR HIGH-GRADE WORK 



Good Packing Good Price 

Good Profits Good Advertising Matter 

Send for samples, prices and advertising matter. 



The Canadian Rubber Co. 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Oar "YANKEE" Tool Book 

tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with FlnRer Tarn on Blade. 




-J _ 

No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




»a 



No. 41. Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points In Handle. 




No. 50. ' Yankoe " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel. Brass. Wood etc. 



Manufacturers also ot 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Flutcrs. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pooket Magazine 

Sorew Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRE 

1 Oo !ou Handle Wire? 

RWe manufacture and sell 
all kinds of Wire. 

r Hay-Baling Wire. 

Oiled and Annealed Wire. 

Plain Galvanized Wire. 

Galvanized Hard Coiled Spring 
Wire. 

IN CARLOADS, OR LESS THAN CARLOADS. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 



rKADI M Mlh 




The " Burgon " 
Patent Sheep- 
Shearing Machine 






WIL 
KIN 

SON 




i> mad..' throughout of highest quality material in conjunction 
with correct mechanical principles. Will clip a sheep in three or 

tour minutes, and get about 6 OZ, more wool than with the old- 
fashioned Hand Shears. One of the chief objects of our machine 
is simplicity in construction ; ever)- part is interchangeable, thus 
ensuring satisfaction. The machine is driven by a flexible steel 
core fitted with universal joints. Will run in any position, and 
will not burn or break like f^ut. The Combs and Cutters are 
made of the finest steel, everyone being properly hardened and 
tempered so as to retain a sharp, keen cutting edge. These can 
be resharpened and made equal to new in the course of a few 
minutes, You hold the sheep the same as for Hand Shears, the 
machine does the rest. Can be used for clipping horses by using 
a differently constructed head. 



1^1 



TBADB MA UK 



Decatur, Bull & Co., $??% 

Sole Canadian Agents, 
MONTREAL, QUE. 



fcL 

: W I Li i 

KIN: 

SON; 



TRADE M U.K. 



Screen Door Hardware. 



(NON-HOLDBAOK) 



(HOLD-BACK) 



Made of 
High-Grade 

Steel 
Spring 

Wife 
and in 
Various 
Finishes, 




Spring 
Hinges 

Strong 

and 

Handsomely 

Finished. 




Large 

STOCK 

Prompt 

SHIPMENTS, 



STAR COIL 
DOOR SPRING, 
Also the OEM. 



COLUMBIA 

Single and Double Acting. 



ACORN. 



TORBEY ROD 
DOOR SPRING. 



FOR PRICES WRITE: 



The Columbian Hardware Co., Makers, Cleveland, oh 

Lamplough & McNaughton 



10. 




— 11^^ 




CANADIAN SALES AGENTS, 



GEM WIRE DOOR PULL. 



9 De Bresoles Street, 



MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



DI88T0NS 
FILES 
ARE 
USED 
THE 
WORM) 
OVER. 




DISSTON'S 

SAWS 

HAVE 

NO 

EQUAL. 




DISSTON'S HORSE TOOTH RASP. Jointed, Length 20-ini. 




DISSTON'S LEVEL, No. 21, 26 to 30-ins., Extra Quality and Finish. /V/V" 

,cCTn. *^ 



DISSTON'S 

FILES 
OUTLAST 

AND 
OUTSELL 

ALL 
OTHERS 



** , 



vt* 



*"< 



s 



*S 



GOODS 

OF 
MERIT 




WHY 

NOT 

SHARE 

IT. 



DISSTON S CIRCULAR SAWS, from 1 to 76 ins diameter. 

BROS. 
& CO. 



LEWIS 



WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS. 

Address all co r re spon dence to MONTREAL* 



TORONTO, 87 VORK ST. 
OTTAWA, 54 QUEEN ST. 




DISSTON'S Saw Clamp and 
Filing Guide. 




DISSTON'S 

SAWS 

ARE 

SOLD 

ON 

REPUTATION 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



X*************^t^*^*^^*^^^tJ^ 



* 



44 Something Doing" 

will be the verdict if you are carrying a well-assorted 
line of our "BICYCLE SUNDRIES." 

Our New Catalogue for 1903 will be out on February i, and it will interest you to 
get our prices on... 

Bells, Pumps, Brakes, Spokes, Lamps, 

and everything for the equipment of a Bicycle. 

YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT THEM. 



ACCESSORIES DEPARTMENT: 

Canada Cycle and Motor Co., Limited 

Winnipeg, man loronto Junction, Canada. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

v» -»-• —i* *-»■• •'i* * : i ; * ^i* —"i* » j-* •'i - -* ^i^* •'i^ ^j^ ^j"'* ^j^ ^t-* ^i^ *^j>* ^j^ ^i^ *^j-« ^i^ ^j^* *-"j^ *^i - -* --"t^ *^j-* •'i^ •'"j^ ^j^* ^i^ ^4^* ^i^ ^j^* ^j^ *^|^* *^~<* ^^ *^i-* *>^ *^l^* ^^ *^l^ ^r 



* 
* 

* 

4 
* 

* 

* 

4 
* 



/TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS 
V"* ROPERIE 



AN UFACTU 

OF 



LEITH 



*ERs 



^_40 
1 

STEAMER 
CLOTH 



|, W SAIL CLOTH ° 
WCOMPANVff 

/750 



Cordage 



MANILA ROPE 

SISAL ROPE 

NEW ZEALAND ROPE 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHING LINES 

NETTINC TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS & PACKINCS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS 




& Canvas 




1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAULINCS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPING TWINES 



BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



30- 
P. 1 

EDINBURCHI 

Waterproof 
] '<& 

I'J^r AND &4 
WSAIL CLOTHE! 
l^COMPANYJE? 
t-lE'TH^ 1 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE AND STORES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND MKTAL 



See! V u Unii'l Have to Pul 1 . 
A Child Can Do It. 





UILT IHJLlt n 






IMMKW «K.n* I 



No 15 



No 39 



r nu union' 

I'ULll 



No 14 




(W<IIIU»I»U ] 




No 16 I 



Walker's Self=Pulling Cork Screws 

Made of Crucible Steel. Nickel Plated, Polished Wood handles. 

EVERY ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED Several Imitation* on the merket. but none •• food. 

Mfrd. only by BRIE SPICIALTY CO., Krle, Pa., U.S.A. 



IRON, 



We are headquarters for all kinds of new and 
old metals, babbitt, solder, etc. 



WANTED 



METALS, 



It will pay you to ask for 
our prices before buying. 



We pay highest market price for scrap metals. 
Write us when having anything for sale. 



RUBBER. 



FRANKEL BROS., 



92 Wellington St., MONTREAL. 

1 1 6- 1 30 George St . TORONTO. 







CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in The Canadian Hardware 
and Metal Merchant. 



A Good Manager 

will see tli.U his store gets the best wrapping 
paper at the right price. Such a one 



Will Order 



our brown or mantlla wrapping papers, 
which always gives the completest satisfac- 
tion. They are strong, durable, good 
weight and a full 480 sheets to the ream. 

CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



STANDARD TIN WORKS 

MANTKACTl'RERS OF 

TINWARE AND UN CANS 

Fruit Cans, Meat Cans, 
J .ekutod Oil Cans 

Baking Powder Cans, 
Lard Pails, Etc. 

JAS. A. /YlcGOLPIN 

156-162 Duke Street, TORONTO. 



Progressive 
Merchant* 



Know the advantage of getting for their custom- 
ers the most modern and improved machinery or 
goods to do their work cheaper and give better 
and more permanent results. 

It is clearly evident that FIELD WOVEN 
COILED SPRING FENCE gives the best 
satisfaction, and LONDON FENCE MA- 
CHINES are by long odds the most improved, 
most rapid and most complete field weaving 
machines in the world It is a surprising fact that 
it costs less to stretch and weave a rod of fence in 
a field with a London than to do it in the factory, 
and the fence is also better value by 25 per cent. 

London Fence Machines will sell more wire 
for you and the two are more profitable than teady- 
woven fencing*. 

Our line is well advertised and we offer liberal 
terms and exclusive agency. 

Address— 

The London Fence Machine 
Co., Limited 

Head Office and Works, LONDON, ONT. 
American Office and Works: Cleveland, Ohio. 

Wortman & Ward Manufacturing Co.. Montreal, Que., 

1 renenu Agents for Quebec. 
A. P. Bfaodonald, Winnipeg, 

C-iMiiil Aj-cnl for Man. and N.W.T. 

Agency: The London Pence Machine Co., Limited, 

at Suiiunerside, for P.E.I. 

Agency: The London Fence Machine Co., Limited, 

at Kentville, for Nova Scotia. 



THE MOST G0MPLE1E STOCK 



Brass a nd Copper 



in Sheets. Tubas, Wire and Rod. 



Service Right, 
Quality Right, Prices Right 



WATERBURY BRASS GO. 

122 to 130 Centre St., New York City. 



Always have our classified Stock 
List before you. 

YOURS FOR THE ASKINQ. 



THE LONDON SCALE WORKS 

OEORGE M. FOX 

(Successor to Johu Fox.) 

Manufacturer of Railroad, Hay and 

Platform Scales. 

91 York Street, LONDON, ONT. 

Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in The Canadian Hardware and 
Metal Merchant. 



€£&£*> 




44 



Crown" 



asa 




Base Ball, 

Tennis, 

Lacrosse 




h>C. 



fOV^ 




a 'QfesXyV' 



*■■■«■•*•■•■■■■■■■■■-, 

I::::::::::::;::::::: 



also 



Many Specialties for Spring Trade. 

Write For Catalogue. 




Nerlich & Co., 



146-148 Front St. West, 

Opposite Union Station, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Rn DN/ACC 2 C*C\ port talbot, south wales, 
. D. D T MOO QL UU. f great Britain. 

Largest MAKERS OF 

BEST SIEMENS STAMPING ENAMELLING 

BLACK PLATES, 

CIRCLES. RECTANGLES. Etc. 

MAKERS of all descriptions of STEEL SHEETS . 
Brands "SKER," and SKER BEST." 

Sole Canadian Export Agents, * 

ROBERT CROOKS & CO., Botolph House, 10, Eastcheap, LONDON, E.C. 



Cable address : "CROLLO," LONDON. 



IT PAYS TO INVEST 



fm^jfaStitaSijft^i cashier k * l ^* i A.*A. , A!l 



IN OUR ORNAMENTAL 



Office Railings, Fences, Grills, 
Fire Dogs, Etc. 




Because they arc 



Re-liable 

Orname 
Non-Tar 



sive 

ntal 

r-» ishable 



Canada Foundry Company. 

LIMITED. 

Head Office: TORONTO, ONT. 

DISTRICT OFFII I - 
Montreal. Winnipeg, Halifax Otteink Vhiu'-ihut Victoria ITniliiMl 



Have your store Bright and Light. 

Install LUXFER PRISMS and make Business Easy. 
We manufacture and deal in all kinds of ^■^■^ 









I 









GLASS FOR 
STORE FRONTS 

and INTERIORS 

Will make suggestions valuable to your customers. Discount to Trade. 

Luxfer Prism Co., Limited 

lOO King Street West TORONTO. 



! 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




Mark 

Our Chief Business 

is making mantles that 
last the loogibt and give 
_ the most light. 
f\ is indelibly brand- 
/l_eil on the bestman- 
.les made. 

Our factory is equipped 
with Up-to-date applian- 
ces; our output is the lar- 
gest ; our goods the most 
reliable — We use nickel 
steel wire supports. 

We handle ot her goo-Is, 
in such quantitiesthat we 
can quote you lower pri- 
ces th in you can import 
them for. No charge for 
cases or packing. 

Wri'e for our quotations en : 



HIGH GALLERIES \ Best 
LOW " (Quality 

HIGH GALLERIES I 2nd 
LOW •' i Quality 

STRAIGHT CHIMNEYS 
BARREL 
MICA 

MICA CANOPIES 
OPAL SHADES PEAR GLOBES 

APPLE GLOBES SUNDRIES 






AUER LIGHT CO., 



MONTREAL. 



•s 



i. 




H 



Clipper, 



PATENTED 1874. 



The Ring of 
Centre-Adjustment 

Clippers 

still remains 

unsurpassed 

after a run of nearly 

THIRTY YEARS 




The Improved 

B. PATTERN 
■• NEWMARKET " 

may now be obtained 
from all jobbers. 

Detachable Plates. 

Improved Cap with 
Long Bearing. 

Rigidity and Easy 
Running. 

Accurately Machined 
and Perfectly Fitted. 

All Parts Interchangeable. 



MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



BURMAN & SONS, LIMITED 

BIRMINGHAM, E NGLAND - 



Supplies for the Maple Syrup Season. 



Sap Buckets . 




-EXTRA DEEP AND STRAIGHT. 
—THREE SIZES. 

They possess many advantages over the ordinary 
flaring Buckets — be ng small in diameter they do not 
catch the rain or snow, and as they are very deep, 
they hang perpendicularly, and consequently will 
not overflow until full. 

— Covers supplied if required. 

— They nest close for shipping or storing. 

We can also supply the ordinary Flaring; or 
Western Sap Palls. 



E. T. Sap Spouts. 

MADE OF RETINNED STEEL-STRONd AND DURABLE. 

Only require a ^-in. hole in tree. 

It does not cover the inside surface of the hole : therefore 

larger amount of sap is obtained. 

Packed in card-board boxes. 




Maple Leaf 

Sap Spouts. 




Made in Bronzed Steel. 

Require a K-in. hole. 

Has a shoulder which prevents it being 
driven in too far. 

The hole in the tree is not exposed to wind 
and snow ; consequently, sap will flow longer. 

Packed in card-board boxes. 




Syrup Cans, round or square. 

Plain or decorated. Made in yi , l A , and i gallon sizes. 

Either Wine or Imperial Measure. 

A full stock carried in all lines ; orders shipped promptly. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 



TORONTO, CANADA. 




"T 

r\f\r\ 





** 'l^*|p ^./P^;;* 5 ^" 



;?ryi 



, - i 



w^^mmmmmmm^m^^ 




VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 31, 1903. 



NO. 5. 



COMMENT ON CURRENT TOPICS. 



I'M 1 1-. Maska boundary question is 7s 
years old, and il is time Greal Britain 
and the United States had sense 
enough to settle it. The one is older than 
Methuselah and the other has scon a 
i rni in \ and a quarter. 

* » * 

Quite a little energy is being developed 
in Ontario over the question ol electric 
power. But then the development of 
energy is one of the offices of the electri* 

> urrent. 

* » * 

Blunders on the part of railwa) officials 
there always will be. And what is wanted 
more than anything else, as a guarantee 
tor the safet) of the travelling public, is a 
mechanical device thai will put an effectual 
check en these blunders, 

* * * 

It is now claimed that sugai can be 
made from sawdust. This will encourage 

us to " saw wood And s,i\ nothing." 

* * # 

Regrettable unpleasantries are sur- 
rounding tin attempt of Greal Britain 
and German) to compel reluctanl Ven- 
zuela to pa) her debts. And Germany, 
with both the press of Great Britain and 
the United States slinging mud at her. 
seems particularly to ho having a had 
quarter of an hour. Bui a policeman's 
lot never was a happy one, particularl) 
when duty assigned him to the collection 

of debts. 

* * * 

The Toronto News speaks of Hugh 
Blain, of Eby, Blain & Co,, Limited, as 

Mr, Hugh Blain, M.P." Mr. Blain is 
not an M.P., hut he ought to be, and The 
News is possibl) so convinced of this that 
it inadvertent h tacks on the abbreviations 



that he would wear if his presence indeed 
graced the House of Commons. 

* * * 

The fast Atlantic steamship line is that 
which the slow-acting politicians have 
been wrest lint; with tor a decade oi more. 

# * w 

An assemblyman in Albany has intro- 
duced a Bill compelling packers to date 
their canned goods. The same old mania. 
The same old display of ignorance. And 

some member in the Canadian House of 

Commons is almost certain to have a 

similar attack. 

» * * 

Canada is developing so rapidly these 

days that it is possible she may eventually 
enclose within her borders that part ot 
the United States known as Alaska as 
well as that part lying south of the 4!)th 

parallel. 

* * * 

The opinion obtains that while a good 
many of us are m>intf short on coal the 
pockets of the dealers are getting long. 

* * * 

There is a suit of Stone versus Brooks 
before the Toronto Assi/c Court. Evi- 
dently the old case of brooks running over 

stones 

* » 

Complaints are still coming from the 
Northwest regarding the grain blockade. 

By-and-bye we shall he having a blockade 

of Complaints. And what then.' 

* ♦ » 

The ranks of those in the United Slates 
opposed to ratification of the treaty with 

Cuba have been strengthened by the addi- 
tion of the British Government thereto; 

an alliance of defence and defiance as it 
wire. And the latest news from Wash- 

ington is to the effect that the allies an 



likel) to come oil victors, for the time 
being at am rate. 

* * # 

The petition and CTOSS-petition in the 
North Y\>rk election case has been dis- 
missed, neithei part) having an) evidence 
l o offer, as, of course, per arrangement. 
And thus again has the public got what 
is known in ^porting circles as the "double 

cross, " 

* # 

Canada does not appear lo be at all 
perturbed over the fail that she is at war 
with Venezuela, And as long as Jack 
Frost is on j, r uard there is no danger of the 
enemy's gunboats ascending the Si Law- 
rence and entering the Greal Lakes, bom- 
barding the chief cites en route. 

* » * 

If railwa) accidents keep multiplying 

during the next few months as they 
have during the past few weeks, nervous 
travellers will either lake tO dirigible bal- 
loons or static coaches. 

* * * 

Three large locomotive companies in 
Scotland have amalgamated with a capital 
of $10,000,000. The) will now he able lo 
get up Steam and go ahead, while it is \uy 
doubt intended that competitors shall be 
forced off the track. 

« * ♦ 

The chief danger about the bombard- 
ment of the Venezuelan fort by th« 
man gunboats is that damage might be 

done lo the sacred Monroe Doctrine. Il 
is a valuable national asset, and if il 

were cracked Uncle Sam would feel 

as would an old maid over the smashing 

of a piece of pet china. 

« ♦ « 

Strong measures for meting out ade- 
quate punishmonl for all sorts of political 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



corruption will be found when public 
opinion i- strong enough to demand the 

desideratum. 

• * * 

When the bar congratulates a lawyer 
on his elevation to the bench it does not 

follow that drinks are taken over the bar. 

♦ * * 

The Alaska boundary question ^ot be- 
yond the bounds of common sense some 

time ago. 

* * * 

The manufacturers of rubber goods are 
trying to get increased protection. In 
other words, they want the tariff stretch- 
ed. It is only natural thai the tariff on 
rubber should be elastic 

» * * 

The Toronto Street Railwa) Company 
have hit upon a now fuel economizing 
scheme on their cars. The chimney on 
each ear is fixed so thai the draft goes 
down instead of up. At the same time 
improper language is drawn from the 
shivering passengers. Hut that does not 
bother the company, lor corporations have 
no souls, and consequently will have no 
account to render in the next world. 

CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

DOMINION OILCLOTH CO. 

T 1 1 1-2 calendar presented this year by 
the Dominion Oilcloth Co., Limited, 
is large and striking. L'nlike many 
calendars, prominence of the date sheet is 
not sacrificed to the advertisement. The 
figures are distinct, and therefore the 
calendar is useful for the office. The 
advertisement consists of a half-tone en- 
graving of the factory, surrounded by a 
wreath of maple leaves in green and red. 
The background is a blight yellow and 
the firm's name appears in red with green 
shadings. 

v NEAT NOTICE. 

A copy of the notice of the Kentville, 
VS.. Hoard of Trade meeting for Janu- 
ary 31, 1903, has been sent to us by 
M. G. DeWolfe, ex-president of the Mari- 
time Hoard of Trade. It is very neatly 
gotten up, and does credit both to the 
directors of the Hoard of Trade and to the 
press of the town of Kentville. It might 
be copied with advantage by larger Hoards 
of Trade than that of Kentville. 

BUSINESS man's > ALENDAR. 
The calendar of Alex. McArthur & Co., 
manufacturers of laired felt, Montreal, is 
a useful one for a business man. Bach 
sheet gives space to three days, with blank 
spaces opposite the dates for memos or 
remarks. Only the business davs are re- 
corded on this calendar, Sundays and 
general holidays not being marked. 



BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



i k '"I^RA DE conditions in British Colum- 
1 bia have been satistfactory during 
the past year," said c'. I.. Light- 
loot, manager of the tiurnev Foundry 
Company's Vancouver branch to Hard- 
ware vxn Mi 1 vi. on Tuesday. "The 
outlook, too, is promising indeed. Trade 
is now of large volume, and done along 
legitimate lines; our business men have 
been careful and have bought wisely. 

"The day is not far past when trading 
in British Columbia was unstable; main 
of the retailers were imbued with a mania 
for speculation, and spent as much time in 
thinking of and looking after their 'hold- 
ings', as they did in minding their regular 
business. Once buying was frequent, and 
there was altogether too much changing 
about. Sometimes a town would spring 
up in a few months, and then when mer- 
chants were catering to the various wants 
of the people there would be a sudden de- 
parture of population, and the merchants 
would have to move after the trade. 

"To-day business is much the same as 
as in the older sections of Ontario. Willi 
the exception of the lead mining industry 
of the Slocum the industries of the Pro- 
vence have settled down to solid business 
and steady expansion. 

"The Provincial law prohibiting the ex- 
portation of boys has been of great benefit 
to lumbering interests, just as seems to 
have been the case in Ontario. Several 
Seattle mills have comeo ver to British Col- 
umbia. Immense plants have been in- 
stalled in and about Vancouver. The re- 
sult has been that better lumber and 
shingles are being made, and the industry 
is prospering in every way. 

"The fishing industry is largely in the 
hands of the syndicate, which can be de- 
pended on to keep it on a steady, solid 
basis, though, of course, the catch varies 
from year to year. 

"The mining interests are in satistac- 
lorv shape. At Nanaimo, Comox and 
Fernie soft coal is being produced in ever- 
increasing volume. Al Canmore anthra- 
cite, not equal in quality to Pennsylvania!! 
coal, is mined. The soft coal is in general 
use for fuel, and plays the mischief with 
the fire-box. 

"Where soft coal is used cast-iron 
stoves are in general demand, but in the 
interior towns, where freight has to be 
carried many, sometimes hundreds, of 
miles by waggons, steel stoves and ranges 
are insisted on. The reason is the danger 
of breakage and the heavy cosl of trans- 
portation. For instance, to reach Prince- 
ion a stove has to go 60 miles on a wag- 
10 



gon, and at a cost of $:i a pound. A rail- 
way through the district would be a great 
property, for it would open a grand coal- 
mining and agricultural country. 

"There is, by the way, a railway in 
prospect. The Coasl-Koolenav railway 
has received a charter to construct a road 
from Vancouver to Midway, but 1 do not 
know what the promoters are doing in the 
matter now. The rank and file of the 
people are opposed to land subsidies and 
public opinion forced to withdrawal of a 
generous grant to Mackenzie & Mann, 
Which had almost gone through the Pro- 
vincial House. 

" The most vital question before the 
people of British Columbia to-day is I he 
lead-mining industry. Remember first 
that the total population of the Province is 
not greater than that of 'Toronto ; as the 
lead-mining industry would, if properly 
protected, give employment to 1,000 men, 
many of whom would be married, you can 
understand the importance to residents of 
British Columbia of this question. If the 
labor of 1,000 men in Toronto were de- 
pendent on Government action you can 
realize how powerful the agitation would 
be to secure that measure. 

"The matter is one of importance to 
the manufacturers and business men ol 
the Dominion, too, for if the employment 
of an additional 1,000 men gave an 
impetus to business in British Columbia 
the influence of the same would be felt in 
even' part of Canada." 



The afternoon of January I'.) saw the 
opening of the C. N. R. tile elevator al 
Port Arthur, when the first stream of 
wheat was poured into one of the eighty 
20,000-bushel tanks. Although the build- 
ing is not entirely completed, the storage 
of wheat can be steadily carried on until 
2,000,000 bushels have been put away. 
The elevator is fireproof. It is built 
altogether of tile, steel and cement, even 
to the room and foot walks about the 
tanks, which are laid on steel supports. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^^ 

Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSNESS CHANGES. 

D1FFIC1 1/llKS. kSSIGNMEN I 3, COW 
PBOMISES. 

,1 J. (II LBBONNE \i . genera] mei 

\ t-h jin < . Irnprior, Ont.j has assign 
ril. and a meeting nf bis oreclil 
nis will be beld on February 2, 

\ M.ili'.i. addler, St, George l 
Que., ban .i igned 

Mitchell Broi & Co., general msrchante, 
Arthur, Out., are offering i" oomproi 

EC II Breckinridge, general merchant, 
Aylnii i . Que., i- offering to oom] d 

I Germaine, general merohant, oi St. 
Bazile, Que., baa assigned to V. I" Para 
die 

Palmer Bros., general merchant . Bed 
ii>i d, Que . 1 1 .- 1 \ !• assigned to -I . McD 
Miiiiis. 

Roussin & Frere, oarriageniakers, Mont- 
1 1 eal, ba> ■ tssig aed to Marcotte A Mai 
cotte. 

Oct. \ Verette, general merchant, St. 
Scholastique, Que., is offering ti> com 
promise. 

Morrison & Co . general merchants, of 
Bella Colla, B.C., have assigned to Wm. 
II Little. 

A meeting oi the creditors oi Parkei >^ 
Co., general merchants, Hawkssbury, 
Ont., was held on January 27. 

The meeting oi creditors oi Sheridan & 
general merchants, Beeton, Out., has 
been adjourned to February 3. 

\ meeting oi creditors of J. T. Dono 
ran, general merchant, of Caseelman, 
(int., was beld on January --. 

\ meeting of the creditors of Thomas 
McKissock, contractor, Sault Ste. Marie, 
l int.. will be held on I'Vl.i uai \ _'. 

George W. Helwig, hardware merohant, 
Hanover, Ont-, has assigned to Henry II 
Miller; a meeting oi creditors will beheld 
"a February I 

Ambrose 1.. Fisher, Beed merchant, of 
Brock/ville, Ont., has assigned t.. '. 
A. Dana : a meei ii ditors will lie 

Ih'IiI on February 2. 

James Knight, blacksmith Qaledon 
township, Ont.. has assigned to Joseph 
1 Kelly, ami a meeting of In- creditors 
will lif held on January 31. 

T. -I. Mayhew, general merchant, of 
Thamesville, Ont., has assigned in trust 
(o ('. B. Armstrong ; a meeting of cred 
rtore will In- lu'lil on Februarj J 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED \\H 

DISMi|.\ I D 

I I''. Taylor, general merchant, Urui 
ton, B.C . i- admitting l . M. \. d into 
partnership. 

Brownstone & Steinberg, general 
chants, Rosenield, Man., have dissolved 
partnership ; Mr. Steinberg continu 

McKenzie i\ Benson, agri ultural imi 1 
ment agents, Sitrathcona, \ W.T., have 
admitted R I Purvis to partnership. 

Uex Anderson, hardware merchant and 
ultural implement uyent. Saltcoata, 



tW 



Six nig 1 arnish Specialties 

Tin- Slit i win Williams ^,\ Big Varnish S| | ^ liir; tellers, Tluv 

an' splendid n presentativet oi a lull line which we have erlected to in- poshed 

•■energetically ami thoroughly as we know how. You know what that 

means, They have each proved ol lug selling false; they arc goods i"i 
which tlu- painter has frequent use; tluv arc right in quality ami right in 
price. 




3LE 



OURABLE SPAR 



aini IH-.I.I. \ good, hon 
•■Ht rsmJsfa ut ■ popular 



A n iruidc i ubblng •»'"' 

■ 

• \' • |.tl.)|lu| 

Mtl'l" 



P i I DM ftlld >ill 

ouUkta irorfc thttl 

sure 



flAKNOJ 



A <lur.il, I, Bool 



■ lr> 

fyrllltj wl ii, iin.,.,.,1 oil iriihoul 

■ iir.ll, i 




gpp* 



A Uqukl iroo 

,i«t nit; on n 

■rood »'>rk IFI 

\ loner. 



We have begun a systematic and vigorous campaign to introduce these 
products to every painter and decorator on the continent. Our plans in- 
clude a free distribution of samples, direct advertising, and special helps for 
the dealer. 

If you haven't these goods on your shelves, write us for prices ami further 
information. Do it to-day. 




The Sherwin-Williams Co. 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 



CLEVELAND, 

CHICAGO. 

NEWrORK, 



MONTREAL. 
TORONTO. 
WINNIPEG. 



NEWARK, SAN FRANCISCO, 

BOSTON. LOS ANGELES, 

KANSAS CITY. MINNEAPOLIS 

CANADIAN DIVISION 

HEADQUARTER*. & PAINT 'ACTOHY, TORONTO DCPOT. 

2i St. Antoine Street, Montreal. 86 York Street. 

VARNISH FACTORY, WINNIPEG OIPOT. 

St. Patrick Street, Montreal. 147 Bannatyne St., East. 



N.W.T., ha- admitted II. R. Smith to 
partnership. 

SALES MADE \\n PENDING. 
II 11. Mann, general merchant, Shel 

land. Ont.. has sold out to John A- Wil 

Mam-. 

M. McGuire, agricultural implement 
agent, Dresden, Ont., has sold out to R. 
Brewer. 

I ' man Rio- . general merchants, 1 
man. Out., an- advertising their business 
for sale. 

irge Brasher, general merohant, of 
Tillsonburg, Ont., advertises his 3rj 

stuck for -ah' 

Tin' stock of John Mcfiean A Company, 
general merchant, wn, i- tn be 

-old on February I 

The stock of H. C. Ma--, estate of, 
hardware merchant. Toronto, is adver- 
tised for -ale by auction. 

The assets of .1. T. Donovan, general 
merchant, Casselman, Ont , are to be sold 
by auction on February 9 

J. A. Kerr, hardware merchant, Regina, 
11 



N.W.T., ha- -old out to The Western 
Hardware Company. Possession, Febru 

ary I . 

The stock of Dod of 1. 

general merchant-, of Duart, Out, is ad 
vertiaed to be -old by auction on Janu 
J7. 

\l\\ FIRMS WD I RANGES. 

The Canadian Broom Company ha- 
commenced business in Ottawa. 

• I. .1. Fiith. blacksmith, Boissevaiu, 
Man . ha- been succeeded My Black iV 
l.othiam. 

G I Nicholson, general merchant 
1 Hi-. Ont . has opened a branch at 
Copper Cliff. 

Parke .v. Button, agricultural imj kunenl 
agents, Medora, Man., have been hi 
id by W. II. Dandy. 

Parks & Button, agricultural imple 

agenl -. Napinka. Man . ha 
ceeded bj W. ( '•- Hicks. 
DEATHS 
I,. \ Noecker, of Noecker a. Son, hard 
ware merchants, Dravton, Out 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RESPONSIBLE FOR WIFE'S 
PURCHASES. 

J I STICE DAVIDSON delivered an im- 
dgment in Montreal las! 
ding the responsibilit) ot a 
goods ordered by his wife 
The ~uit was brought b) J. V. Calcutl, 
importer, against ».'. L. Tiffin, alleging 
thai the latter ordered .1 quantitj of house- 
hold linen worth $1,325.86, to be manu- 
factured specially in Ireland ; the goods 
being now here ;md ready for delivery. 

Mr Tiffin slated that the goods had 
been ordered by lii> wife, from whom he 
i- separated a> to property. 

It was shown that the order had been 
sent to Ireland, siibjecl to further orders 
.is to si/,.- of cloth, etc. Six months or so 
afterwards the plaintiff wrote to Mrs. 
Tiffin inquiring when she wanted the 
goods delivered. When they arrived thej 
were entered to the debit of her account. 

The defendant went with his wife to 
order the goods. He gave some direc- 
tions concerning them, and gave his cheque 
for a previous account. He promised to 
pav for the goods, and when they arrived 
said the house was not ready for them, 
but promised to call. 

His wife called on Mr. Calculi and 
asked him to store and insure the goods, 
according to instructions from Mr. Tiffin. 
When legal proceedings were commenced 
Mr. Tiffin wrote to say that as his house 
was not readv for occupancy, he could not 
have the goods ordered by Mrs. Tiffin 
brought into it, and that he did not feel 
bound to pay for them until the goods had 
been received by him and checked over bv 
a linen expert. 

This k-tter the judge considered to be a 
formal and explicit recognition of personal 
liability. The defendant was well known 
to be the heir of family estates, while Mrs. 
Tiffin was not yet a resident of Montreal, 
and her personal means did not justif) a 
purchase ol ihis kind. The court, there- 
fore, considered that the goods were sold 
on the personal credit of the defendant, 
Mi . Tiffin. 

Another fact tended to lix the responsi- 
bility on Mr. Tiffin. He was married in 
New Vork Siate, where he was separate 
as to property. Hut the judge pronounced 
thai communitj ofpropert) exisis here, as 
Mr. Tiffin had not proven the foreign 
domicile which is a precedent to invoking 
this foreign law. With this facl in view 
the judge held the defendant responsible 
even though his wife had made the pur- 
. base in person. 



The Kenned} Hardware Company, "i 

I ,,,,.,,!,.. havr obtained a • hai U»i 



IVER JOHNSON REVOLVERS 

ARE ABSOLUTELY SAFE. 



ACCIDENTAL 
DISCHARGE 
IS 
IMPOSSIBLE. 



WHAT MORE 
COULD 
BE SAID? 




Send for recently published catalogue. 



SAB'ETY HAMMER AUTOMATIC. 



IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



New Vork Office : 99 Chambers St. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 



WE ARE NOT IN THE TRUST. 



Quality of our goods guaranteed and our discounts very &\ £\ 
| _ B liberal. A trial order solicited. "Write for discounts. ^^ •% 

E*^ 99 Niagara St., TORONTO FILE CO. ■ O 

CANADIAN GOODS FOR CANADIANS. 




For buildings and 
all other purposes 



TRADE 




MARK 



GLASS 

Our Specialty Art Leaded Glass. 

See Our New Catalogue. 

Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 

LONDON, ONI. 

Wobles 8f Ho are. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers oi 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



We have every- 
thing in 



SILVER PLATED WARE. 

Silver- Plated, Hollow, and Flat Ware, Soda and Bar Spoons, etc. 

NEW DESIGNS AND LOW PRICES. 

A very wide range in Flat Ware — many beautiful pieces. 

IF YOU HAVEN'T OUR CATALOGUE, WRITE FOR IT. 

E.W.Gilmore & Bro./Ts. Benedict"" £>"<": Toronto 

12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 

SAR> SPOUTS AIMD BUCKETS 



LIMITED 

ONLY 

WHOLESALE 










Sap Spouts, wirli Hooks. 




Sap Buckets, 10 Quarts 



DEMORIMERS 




"Perfect" Dehorner. 
Hit- niiini p id* from Malleable Iron, 

ihf Blades irmn Tool Steel, 



"Keystone" Dehorner, Wood Handles. 

complete with Rope. 



MAY KNIVES 





T. and L. Handle 



J 

"Lightning." 



V \ Y 

"Heath's." 



Barclay's 



SEE OUR HAROWARE CATALOGUE 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. — o. Toronto. 



LETTER OROERS 

SOLICITEO 



Graham Nails are t H e> Best 

Faotory : Duff«rln Street. Toronto 

13 



OUR PRICES 

ARE MIGHT 



H«rdw«r«? tnd 
Metal 




BRITISH MACHINERY TRADES. 

I\ .1 comprehensive review of British 
tiado conditions, taken from the 
Board oi Trade statistics, The Brit 
isIi Trade Journal says : " Probably the 
most notable feature of the year in tech 
uical engineering has been the progress 
made in the application of electricity for 
public and industrial purposes. Most of 
our cities ■ and towns have now their elec- 
tric lighting and tramway systems in full 
operation, while the latter are being con- 
tinued well into the countiy distiiets 
surrounding industrial centres, and num 
erous sehenies are ou foot for tramways 
or light railways, arranged with a view 
to acting as cross-country feeders to the 
main railway and tramway .systems for 
both passenger and goods services. Elec- 
tricity as a means of power transmission 
is also daily becoming more highly ap- 
preciated in works and factoiies. We aie 
Unable to discover any very marked al 
terations in the methods of generating 
and distributing electricity. The high- 
tension multiphase current system ap- 
pears to gain favor generally, but there 
are indications that more care is now 
taken than formerly to deal with each 
particular scheme on its merits, and to 
adopt whichever system is best suited to 
the conditions prevailing in each local 
ity. There is a tendency also in gener- 
ating stations to prefer large units of 
high power rather than more numerous 
and srnall«'j-sized units. Some impetus 
has been given to the multipha-e power 
distribution system also by the fact that 
certain master patents, which have hither- 
to made it something of a monopoly, 
have lapsed. 

"ProbabK the most important advances 
of the year have been in connection with 
the production of cheap gas and its ap- 
plication for motive-power purposes. It 
may I" tab □ as a generally admitted 
fact thai the gas engine is more efficient 
in converting heat into work that the 
Bteam engine, but it is only comparative- 
ly recently that gas engines of large 
powei have been successfully constructed. 
We are convinced that the gas-producer 
and engine are destined to re) lace the 
steam boiler and engine to a very large 
it in the near future. 

"It may be taken for granted that for 

underground railway- the steam locomo 

has had it- day, but, perhaps, the 

ignificani innovation has been the 



decision of two (important railway com- 
panies to electrify portions of their lines. 
Although no actual progress in construc- 
tion has been made in connection with 
the Manchester and Liverpool mono rail 
line, we believe that all preliminaries aie 
now complete, and that a start is to be 
made very shortly, while other schemes 
of a like nature are well advanced. 

STEAM MOTORS. 

"Jn steam-engine installations for land 
work, while there have been no revolun- 
tionarv changes, steady progress has been 
made in the direction of increased effi- 
ciency and in details for labor saving. 
Although boilers of the water-tube type— 
the Babcock, Stirling, and Climax, are 
instances— are more largely used, and are 
entirely successful, those of the Lanca- 
shire type are still the prime favoiites. 
The use of the superheated steam as a 
means of attainL.^ superior economy in 
high-class installations is likely to be- 
come general, and in the present state of 
knowledge, appears to offer the best op- 
portunities for improvements in steam- 
engine efficiency. Experience has shown 
that we have nothing to fear from Amer- 
ica as the result of the Glasgow Electri- 
city Department's experiment. -We under- 
stand that both the Musgrave .and Allis 
engines are working well, but, on the 
whole, according to the opinions of the 
most reliable experts, the former are by 
far the better job. 

LOCOMOTIVES. 

"It is gratifying to note that our fore 
casts in regard to our supremacy as lo 
comotive builders have been fulfilled. Cer- 
tain pessimists freely expressed the o| in 
ion two years ago that we were rapidly 
losing ground in this department, that 
our foreign and colonial trade was al 
ready undermined, and that ultimately 
home railways would purchas ■ most of 
their engines abroad. Ve find in tead 
that British-built locomo'.i.is wee ne er 
so universally e^t erne 1 as they aie at the 
present time. Colonial railways ha in.: 
given a ttial to Ame ican and Gernia i en 
Liines. aie | racti ally ui anin.o s i 1 | refer 
ring the British productions. India and 
Egypt have been excellent customers dur- 
ing 1902, and at the clo e of the year a 
important Japa^e e contract has, 
after keen competition of the lea'.in^- 
American and German linn-, I een placel 
in Scotland, and we hear Cat the Scotch 
tender won the day in regard to both 
14 



the quality of the work offered and the 
lowness of price. 

OTHER MACHINERY. 

"Our exports o f agt icultnral engines and 
machinery to European eountiies have 

been about normal, but to the colonic-. 
especially South Aiiica, they have in 
creased considerably. Exports of textile 
machinery, on the other hand, show a 
general decline ; and there is perhaps no 
branch of the engineeiing tiale in which 
prospects are so clouded as in this one." 

SOMETHING ABOUT VANADIUM. 

CHARLES A. BRAISLER has trans- 
lated for The American Manufac 
turer an article on vanadium, re- 
cently published in The Journal de 'Elec 
trolyse, which authority declares that if 
this little-known metal be added to steel, 
even in such minute quantities as three 
tenths or five-tenths of 1 per cent., it 
confers upon it most lemarkable quali 
ties. The coefficients of resistance of both 
iron and steel, under all conditions as of 
concussion, compression or elongation, 
are raised from single to double their 
value by the addition of vanadium ; at 
the same time, its presence renders steel 
so hard that the union of all these new 
qualities warrants the reduction of armor 
plates to half their ordinary thickness. 
It is indeed difficult to admit that the 
presence in an alloy of iron or steel of 
one-third or one half of one per cent, of 
any element whatever could have such an 
intensifying effect and at the same time 
be so general, which effect is explained by 
the extreme affinity, under certain circum- 
stances, which vanadium has for oxygen. 
This affinity is so powerful that if van- 
adium, even infinitesimal quantities, lie 




Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co., Limited 

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MACHINERY 



I1...l«.rr -rxl 

M. >-i 




Will Hold Up a Shelf ' 

That's what anheirtiraeki-i ll fur 
For tlitM |iur|>iiHi' ihiTf i-»n In- 

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NOTHING CHEAPER 

Hum I In- .... 

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li la trail Japanned, Strong. >»■»•! Light. 

Ihr taring lii frrlKlu It n (DOO. |ir..|n 

imiii die lower price »i srbloli the goodaara told 
ear Orderdlrecl orthroogb four Jobber, 
• TLAS MFO. CO.. New Haven. Conn.. U.S.A. 

Partial List of New and 
Second (land Machinery. 

LATHES. 

I 1,111, v* It ll I 'llllfk 

II ii, v is ii. Pitman HdbmI Lathi 

i I,, mil, Hllil. I; 
ll in I-...H a \N I. iin. I Tun. i Lathe 
tin. i MI11 \. lap Lethe, Mebaatian 

,. . London nuik. . N l« 

.u. in \ 22 11 1 1 ill,. I Ion make, N I \\ 

18-ili. x 1 1 I x I u 

1 .I,., \in, 1 1, ,, 

IRON PLANERS AND SHAPERS. 

rj in \ i- in 1 ■.'."in. South Bend Co make 

13 in 1 15-in. 1 11 mil Planei 

; | n v , ■ in v in ,,, \ 11 R .Mum make 

•jt In 1 , I. lou Pool C • maki M « 

I] in ('nuik Slim.. 1. Mil Ii. I n 

SO In She] NEW 

\ I \\ 

KEY SEATINGr MACHINES. 

\ . | Davis Power Key Beetci \ I w 

. 11. ,,.1 Slotting Mi' bines, American 
M\ Stout IJsl «ill help )■"! tali 1 1 thai nea mat-bine 
\ iura foi 1 he taking 

H W PETRIE 

141-4 16 1 n Bl Waal and 
8 10 IS 11 It IS S0-2S station Bl , TOBOK PO 



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1 1 ' 


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best. 


A. B. 


JARDINE & CO. 


HESPELER, ONT. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 




BUY 

KERR 

VALVES 

Tbej 

satisfai'tiim 
every time, 

Catalogue 

mi application. 



f he Kerr Engine Co. 

LOTTO) 

Walkervilie, Ont. 



Endt Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamond Stove Baok. 

Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 



iiiiiii iiiiii 11 1 

HAHdNO UTTnmun FRUNf OHntf 



Patented Man >. 1 1- 1.. 1893 



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I 1 to iix21. 





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GALT, ONT. 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of 



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ST. MARYS. ONT.. CANADA. 

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Steel Frame Chum. 



LAWN MOWERS 



Patented Features: Improv 
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llieh .mil Lou Wheel*, from 12 in to 20-in. widths. 
Cnld Rolled Steel Shafting. Crucible Steel Knives and 
1 lining 1'lale. 

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Wheelbarrows, in four dissrai sizes 



MAXWELL MOWEB. 
' -In.-li Utm v\ heel 



10 



M. .« 



MACHINERY 



preoeat in a bath of steel in a state of 
fusion, it will load to an immediate and 
absolute reduction ol every trace of iron 
oxide existing in the mass. To these 
traces of non >>.\iie iu steel prepared with 
the utmost care, aud inevitable without 
the use of vanadium, is aitiibuted the 
of steel to crack and rupture. 
.lar characteristic of the van 
adium steel is that it does not acquire 
the maximum hardness through temper 
iug but by reheating to 700 or 800 de- 
nt. 
A \ ariety oi consequences occur from 
this, as, for example: A planer, of which 
the cutting tool was made of vanadium 
steel, was set to work at its full capa 
city a> to velocity and power. In a short 
time the tool began to warm, it even 
reached a red heat, yet it continued to 
take off the same chips of wrought iron 
or castings without showing the least 
effect from the intense heat. . It is scarce 
ly necessary to remark that in such a 
case a tool of ordinary steel would have 
completely lost its temper and cease to 
further cut the casting. 



n'T*] 



HOW TO GET RESULTS. 

k HE more hurry the less speed.' 
Such runs the old saying, but the 
world has come to learn that 
speedy results are gotten from a system 
atic hurry, when each moment is filled 
with some acti\ity, either by brain or 
body, if not of both together. For the 
machinist or metal worker, the following 
rules for making haste are well worth 
pasting up : 

1. Do nothing that you don't have to 
do. Cut out the non-essentials. 

2. Don't hesitate. Begin at once. When 
you are through, stop, and begin on the 
next thing. 

3. Don't be too particular what part 
of the job you begin with. Other things 
being equal, do what is under your hand 
first, and the next nearest thing next. 

!. Don't pause between jobs. 
. Don't go from one job to another 
until the first is done. Do one thing at 
a time. It takes time to change your 
mind. 

6. Do your thinking while you are act- 
ing, and think about the work now in 
hand. 

7. If you have assistants, use them. At 
first, do only what they can't do : after 
wards, help them out. 

8. Do nothing twice. This makes it ne- 
cessary to do it right the first time. 

if you follow these rides and a few more 
that you can make yourself, you will be 
able to reduce your working- hours about 
one-half ; you won't think you are hurry- 
ing; you won't be bored and worn out 
by your work, and when it is over you 
can go homeland romp with the baby 
with an approving conscience and a mind 
at rest. 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES. 

''I'MIE Canada Corundum Company, of 
Toronto, (an., ha\ e started work 
on a new mill and the development 
of waterpower, their intention being to 
■ ■net a plant with a capacity seven to 
times that of their present mill. Ft 
will be well on to the summer befoie the 
new plant will be in proper working 
order. The greater portion of the com- 
pany's produce is marketed in Canada, 
the United States and Germany. 

The P. R. Cumming Manufacturing Co. 
Clarksburg, Out., will instaj machinery 
in a new sawmill shortly. 

The main belt and a large flywheel in 
0. & M. McVean's sawmill at Dresden, 
• Int.. was broken last week, 

A 40-horse-power centie crank engine has 
been shipped by H. W. Petrie, Toronto, 
to Jno. Edgley, Bellamy, Ont. 

A 45-horse-power boiler and engine was 
purchased from H. \V. Petrie, Toronto 
by J. E. Ryckman, of Simcoe, Ont. 

The Ross Rifle Company are building a 
factory in Quebec and will put in enough 
machinery to give employment to over 
200 men. 

James Gillies, Gait, Ont., intends ex- 
tending his planing mill and will instal 
machinery for the manufacture of sashes 
and doors. 

A. F. Dick, Brampton, Out., has instal 
ed a five-horse-power vertical gas engine. 
This machine was furnished by H. W. 
Petrie, Toronto. 

J. P. Mabee, K.C., and Ceo. Wettlanfer, 
of Stratford, Ont., and others are inter 
ested in a proposal to establish a malle- 
able iron works in Stratford. 

A fine tool in the shape of a 21-inch x 
12 ft. engine lathe was installed in the 
plant of Madison Williams, manufacturer 
of water-wheels at Port Perry. This latha 
was purchased from H. W. Petiie, To 
ronto. 

The Hanbury Manufacturing Co., of 
Brandon, Man., are spending $20,000 on 
the equipment of its new factory. Mr. 
Clark, of this company, has just returned 
from making purchases in the United 
States and in Gait, Ont. 

A London, Eng., despatch says that 
the Scottish locomotive builders have 
practically completed a combination of 
the trade in Scotland, the object being 
to fight German and American competi- 
tion in foreign markets. 

Work on The Montreal Locomotive and 
Machine Company's factory will be start- 
ed shortly, says a despatch. It is estim- 
ated that 100 locomotives will be built 
during the first year. E. P. Brophy, of 
Ottawa, will be managing director of the 
company, and R. T. Shea, of The Schen 



ectady Locomotive Works, will he super- 
intendent. 

\ Worcester, Mass, despatch says that 
a ^10,000,000 combine of emery wheel 
manufacturers is being planned. Twenty 
large concerns in different parts of the 
I nited States have been asked to join. 

Samuel Hollander intends to erect a 
new machine shop in Vancouver. The 
building will be 10 by HID feet, two stor 
eys and attic. On the ground floor will 
be a machine shop, 60 by 10 feet and a 
foundry 40 by 10 feet. The second floor 
will be fitted to accommodate lighter ma- 
chinery, and a moulding and pattern 
department. Mr. Hollander wants to be 
able to start' operations within two 
months. 



SOLDERING ALUMINUM. 

AS a result of many inquiries for an 
effective method of soldering alum 
inum, The Metal Worker submitted 
an inquiry to the large aluminum manu- 
facturers of the United States, asking 
their opinion. The general verdict has 
been that no such solder has yet been dis- 
covered. The following answer, from The 
New Jersey Aluminum Company, Newark, 
N.J., is typical. " We do not recommend 
any aluminum solder that we have seen 
up to date. The principal difficulty lies 
in the fact that aluminum, when soldered, 
will often show itself very strong in the 
early stages, such as from one day to - 
probably one month. Then it seems that 
galvanic action sets in, which releases the 
solder from the aluminum. We have re 
cently seen wares that have been soldered 
for six months and which were apparent- 
ly still as good as when first done ; but, 
in practically every case the parts would 
fall asunder in two or three weeks there- 
after. The action seems to be quite sud 
den when it takes effect. There is a de 
mand for a good aluminum solder, but 
the only way that this can be proved is 
to put it into practical use for one or 
two years. Our idea of the situation is, 
that unless the metal can be furnished in 
a purer state than is now the case, sold- 
ering will always lie impracticable. Silicon 
seems to be one of the principal impur 
ities. It renders the metal greasy. If it 
could be eliminated the difficulty of sold 
ering aluminum would be materially re- 
duced." 

AMERICAN ENGINE A FAILURE. 

A London, Eng., despatch on Thurs 
day states that while presiding at a meet 
ing of the shareholders of the Gi eat East 
em Railway today, Lord Claud Hamil 
ton, the chairman, declared that the road 
had tried an Ameiican locomotive for a 
year and a half, but found it to lie a 
complete failure. 



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THE FAIRBANKS COHPANY, 

SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS 

MONTREAL. .... VANCOUVER. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



J. l\liol<lin & Co. 

Great Charles Street, Birmingham, Ellg. 



rttClbU to 



sAJONIci Curtain Rings, Tinned Blind Rings, 

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MAKERS OF 



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"Utile" Curtain Hook. 




GLOBE— POLISH 




INDENTS THROUGH MERCHANTS ONLY. 



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A Practical Influence 






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OPERATING: 
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Mead Office : TORONTO. 

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18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Pre$ident I 

JOHN BAYNB MacI.KAN. 

Montreal. 

rhe Had ran Publishing Co. 

Limited 



Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories. Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, IV K. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

Ml I 

MOMTKIAL - - - 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

["OEONTO - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

London, En<;. - - 109 Fleet Street. E.C. 

W. H, Miln. 
Manchester, Eng. - - 18 St. Ann Street. 

U.S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG - - - Western Canada Block. 

J.J. Roberts. 

ON, ( >n 1 . - - - Hiscox Building. 

Walter H. Lindsa.) . 

ST. JOHN, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
NEW YORK - Room 802 New York Life Bldg. 

\V T. Robson. 

subscription, Canada and United Status, J-J.OO. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 
Cable Address |{£RSS£ 



AMALGAMATION OF COMPANIES. 

r I "^HERE appears to be an erroneous 

L impression abroad among the retail 

dealers of the country in regard to the 

ts of amalgamation of companies upon 

the retail 1 rade in general. 

i\ amalgamation has for its object 
the increase oi business, and hence ol 
profits, hni these profits do not arise oul oi 
the increased prices of goods but usually 
oul of tlii' decreased expenses, especially 
selling expenses, For instance, the various 
companies, before amalgamation, no doubt 
employed travellers to represent ihem who 
crossed and recrossed each other's ground 
each carrying his own sel of samples and 
Hi* douhl calling upon the same customers. 
After the amalgamation, one traveller 
carrying one sel oi samples would no 
douhl be able to cover the same or almosl 
the same ground. Ii stands to reason 
also that the amalgamating companies, 
with increased capital, buying in It 
quantities and thus purchasing raw mater- 
ial at lowei prices and discounts, turning 



EWT< >i:i \i. 

oul target quantities o| goods ul ■ less 
cost, are able to sell al lower figures than 
prei ious to the amalgamation 

I he business is also undei one exei utivc 
lui>| •'nil management, and hence the 
policj oi governing tin husiness is the 
same There have been ■< largt numbei 
oi such amalgamations during the last 
few yeais, ami almost in ever) inatanc* 

the lendenev has lnvil to louel prices, 

giving tlie dealei the in nefil ..1 anj redut - 
lion in the cosl of the finished product 
rathci than in. ie.is ( in pi ii es, The out- 
put alter the amalgamation is large 
enough 10 warrant the employment of 
skilled workmen who are special!) adapted 
toi certain lines ol work md are kept Ihim 
on these lines altogether instead of being 
shifted around from time to time as in the 
small factory. One factor) may be spec- 
ial!) adapted lor the manufacture of cer- 
tain lines of goods, and when the demand 

is large enough, as it no douhl would be 
alter the amalgamation oi interests, this 
factor) mav he kepi running at these 

lines altogether, thus perfecting the manu- 
facture. 



LEAD COMBINE ORGANIZING. 

I he cause ol those who .are agitating 

for an increased tariff on lead and lead 

products is strengthened by the tact that 

the movement towards an amalgamation 
oi the hie; lead concerns of the United 

Slates is now in progress. 

The new organization, which has just 
been incorporated in New Jerse) under 
the style ol" The United Lead Co.. 

will include l'."> of the largest sheet, shot 

and lead pipe concerns in the United 
States. The capital Stock is placed at 
115,100,000, bul this amount will he in- 
creased when the organization has been 

completed. 

It is .1 recognized principle thai com- 
bines are more merciless in their treatment 
oi competitive interests than are ordinan 
business houses, so it is natural to expecl 

that the lead miners oi British Columbia 

cm expect even less consideration from 
the United States lead combine than the) 
have received from the individual concerns 
who have viiiualtv tied up their mines. 

Ill 



t t *> 1 .1 A « , ■ #.,,.' 



SOME OPINIONS ON THE LEAD 
TARIFF 

r I > 1 1* ' v l ten ted in th< »ubj< 

A Montn al an -'ill dist ussin K ii, t 
v isii oi the lead minei ■• ol i ilum- 

Wa. I he feeling among those nol direi ll) 
interested, bul who an ml enough 

Willi the mallei lo ojve an opinion vvoilln 

oi consideration, is not in lull svmpaihv 
with the demands ol the Western visitors. 
One gentleman s.,\s thai the lead pro- 
duced in the British 1 olumbian mines is 
uoi up 1,. the standard ol English lead. ..s 
the silver is nol taken oul ol it proper!) 

leaving it hardei than ii should be. He 
does not believe in protecting .m inferioi 

.11 tit U 

Another fails to see wh) the miners ,,sk 
ioi protection on pig lead. "The British 
Columbian miners have secured practical 
control of the Canadian market now foi 
pik r lead, and ii has been gained In tin- 
aid of the tariff Excepting in the case oi 

a small amount oi English lead used for 
certain kinds oi shot, vv e do almost no im- 
porting. And vei the) ask for .1 higher 

larill ; it eau onlv he so thai thev e.111 raise 
prices." 

An importer said : "If these men vv.nl 

protection wh) don't thev put themselves 
in a position to supph the Canadian mar- 
ket. The corroding is now all done in 
the States. There is no plant in Canada 

lor thai purpose, and no signs of one being 

erected. If the dutv is raised, the lead 
will continue lo he sent lo Chicago for mi- 
roding and shipped hack again lo us. 
Wh) should the tarifl he adjusted to pro- 
tect Italian industn when its proprietors 
show no intention x^i enlarging and com- 
pleting it ? "' 

A paint manufacturer s,us: "|f ( | K . 
dut) is pla, ed on white lead so that Can- 
adian lead miners will have this market to 
themselves it will mean, in time, that not 
onlv all the while lead, hut mixed paints as 
well, will he manufactured at the mines, 
and the paint manufacturer who doesn't 
own his own mine will have lo go out of 
busim 

The v iew thai the puinl manul 
ol the future will he the lead mini 
held hv more than om- in the hits, 
The trend of the trade 1- considered 
working in that dire« tion. 



Hardwftrr and 
Mrt.1 



KDITOKIAL 



CANADA AND THE ALASKA BOUNDARY DISPUTE 



/ "I A Hi: announcement thai there are to 
X be no reservations in the Alaska 
boundary dispute is gratifying to Cana- 
dians. When it was first announced thai 
Britain and the United States had 
ed to submit the dispute to six jurists 
it was intimated, and particularly by The 
New 1 > oik Sun and other American news- 
papers, that there was to be a reservation 
of the same points as was contended for by 
the representatives of the United States on 
the Joint High Commission o( 1898, namely, 
that no question of occupation and sov- 
ereignty regarding these places in Alaskan 
territory in which the citizens of Russia 
in the first instance and those of the L'nited 
States in the second instance had been in 
peaceful and undisputed occupation and 
exercise of sovereignty for more than 70 
years, should be submitted to the jurists 
for consideration. Skagway and Dyea 
are the most important points in the re- 
served territoi v . 

It was this position, taken by the repre- 
sentatives of the L'nited States, that led to 
the indefinite adjournment of the Joint 
High Commission, with the understanding 
that the boundry question should be re- 
ferred back to the respective Governments 
for further diplomatic negotiations. When, 
therefore, it was intimated in the first 
despatch that such places as Skagway 
and Dyea in the disputed territory were 
not to be submitted to the jurists, Cana- 
dians felt they had been compelled to eat the 
leek with all its attendant humiliating cir- 
cumstances. While, however, the text of 
the treaty has not yet been made public, 
we are sssured by Sir Wilfrid Laurier that 
there is no reserved points whatever, and 
that Skagway and Dyea will be accord- 
ingly in the territory upon which the six 
jurists are to adjudicate. 

Canada is somewhat sensitive over inter- 
national disputes of this kind. Possibly 
fearsome would be a better term. And it 
is because her experience in such matters 
has frequently been unpleasant. Being 
a British colony, she has the idea that she- 
has more than once been sm rificed by the 
British plenipotentiaries in order to placate 
the l'nited States. And she has good 



reason for being possessed of this idea. 
We all remember Sir John Macdonald's 
experience of 1871, when he was in 
Washington associated with the British 
representatives, negotiating what after- 
wards bee. one known as the Washington 

[Yeaty. 

" 1 must say," wrote Sir John in a letter 
to Dr. (now Sir Charles) Tupper, " that I 
am greatly disappointed at the course 
taken by the British Commissioners. 
They seem to have only one thing in 
their minds that is, to go home to Eng- 
land with a treaty in their pockets settling 
everything, no matter at what cost to 
Canada." 

I nquestionably there has, within the 
last few years, been a marked change for 
the better in public feeling in Great 
Britain in regard to the importance of 
Canada. But it is also true that in Gov- 
ernment circles the desire to court the 
favor of the L'nited States is stronger than 
ever. This is a good thing as far as it 
goes. But we resent being the sacrificial 
lamb. Fortunately for Canada the board 
or court to which the disputed boundary 
line is to be submitted will be jurists — no 
doubt the best available — and. not poli- 
ticians. 

There are some 30,000 square miles of 
territory in dispute, but even this is scar- 
cely worth being held up as a source of 
international discord year in and year out. 
All that Canada wants is justice. If she- 
gets this she will be satisfied which ever 
vvav the award goes. 



CONDITION OF OUR INDIANS. 

THE annual report of the Department 
of Indian Affairs, which has just been 
issued, cannot but be considered as entirely 
satisfactory. The report reveals the fact 
that in every tribe the Indians of the 
Dominion of Canada are steadily advanc- 
ing in morals, education and industry, 
while their education in sanitary precau- 
tions has, in spile of prevalent epidemics 
and consumption, brought them through 
the year with a net gain of L51. 

20 



The population this year through the 
addition o\ man\ non-tre.itv Indians is 
108,1 12, an increase of 8,585 over last 
year. Their entire income is estimated at 
over $4,000,000, of which $1,200,000 was 
earned in wages ; and the large increase 
of $150,000 in this line shows the growing 
willingness o( the Indian to work and 
provide for himself. 

The small percentage engaged in agri- 
culture own over $500,000 worth of farm 
implements and vehicles, including 87 
threshing machines, 391 reapers and 3,121 
light driving vehicles. 

In the care of live stock the Indian com- 
pares favorably with the ordinary farmer, 
and, since the Government has introduced 
thoroughbred cattle among them, great 
interest has been shown in the rearing of 
cattle, of which they own 35,000 head. 

Every day evidence is given of the in- 
creasing interest in religion and education, 
and very fine buildings are being erected 
for these purposes. There are 2h:>, schools, 
all but 41 of which are denominational. 
Twenty-tw^o industrial institutions and 40 
boarding-schools are included in this num- 
ber, and the aggregate enrollment is 9,669. 
Thirty percent, are Roman Catholics, while 
the Anglicans and Methodists claim about 
14 and 11 per cent., respectively. Of the 
whole 108,000, only 12,000 are pagans, 
and the greater part of these